Brideshead Revisited

James and Toby start out with their own Brideshead Revisited moment as they look back on their days as students at Oxford before getting into the news of the day, including the introduction of mandatory jabs in Austria, the acquittal of Kyle Rittenhouse, the forthcoming trial of Ghislaine Maxwell and the Prime Minister losing his place in a speech to the Confederation of British Industry.

There’s a lot of quick hits in Culture Corner: taking another look at The Queen’s Gambit (Netflix), the season two finale of The Morning Show (AppleTV+), the awfulness of both The Lost Symbol (Peacock in the US, Sky Max in the UK) and An Audience with Adele (ITV, and not to be confused with Adele: One Night Only, concert and interview with Oprah on CBS/Paramount+), James offers a mea culpa about Midnight Mass (Netflix) and Toby takes on Sharpe’s Revenge.

Opening sound this week is the lost Boris Johnson.

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  1. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    Christ Church, Oxford courtesy Toby Young…

    • #1
  2. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    C.S. Forester’s “Hornblower” novels, of course, established the genre, but Patrick O’Brian has him beat on psychological and political complexity.

    He also has the advantage that following two contrasting characters rather than one gives him more ways and angles by which to reveal the world of the British Navy in the Napoleonic Era.

    • #2
  3. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Taras (View Comment):

    C.S. Forester’s “Hornblower” novels, of course, established the genre, but Patrick O’Brian has him beat on psychological and political complexity.

    He also has the advantage that following two contrasting characters rather than one gives him more ways and angles by which to reveal the world of the British Navy in the Napoleonic Era.

    I agree Taras. The Hornblowers are good but O’Brien is a higher level. I think he was almost Austen-like in his look at the British Society. I do absolutely recommend The Good Shepard by Forrestor. I found it riveting.

    • #3
  4. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Does anyone else thinks Boris might have been affected by his rather serious bout with COVID?

    • #4
  5. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    EJHill (View Comment):

    Christ Church, Oxford courtesy Toby Young…

    Thanks to Toby and you.

    • #5
  6. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    colleenb (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    C.S. Forester’s “Hornblower” novels, of course, established the genre, but Patrick O’Brian has him beat on psychological and political complexity.

    He also has the advantage that following two contrasting characters rather than one gives him more ways and angles by which to reveal the world of the British Navy in the Napoleonic Era.

    I agree Taras. The Hornblowers are good but O’Brien is a higher level. I think he was almost Austen-like in his look at the British Society. I do absolutely recommend The Good Shepard by Forrestor. I found it riveting.

    In fact, a large part of Post Captain, the second Aubrey-Maturin book, may be considered a Regency romance, with the two heroes on land during the Peace of Amiens, and falling in love.  It’s considered O’Brian’s tip of the hat to one of his favorite writers, Jane Austen.

    I saw the excellent recent adaptation of The Good Shepherd, starring Tom Hanks, but I have not yet read the book. I recall that Forester’s novel, The African Queen, is kinder to the Germans than the famous movie with Katherine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart.

    • #6