The time has come! Six years ago Craig and Ryan kicked off the Legendarium podcast with a read-through of the Lord of the Rings. Now they’re back, and they’ve got Kyle and Megan in tow as well. In this episode they discuss a bit about the hobbits, the pacing, the poetry and the reasons for Gandalf’s 17-year absence. If you’re hoping to get your fix of Professor Craig, stick around, because that mostly happens toward the end. A note: If you’re looking for an in-depth discussion of the minutiae of this book, look elsewhere! But you can enjoy a discussion amongst friends loosely based around the first book of The Lord of the Rings.

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Music: “Adventure Time” and “The Seven Seas” courtesy of https://www.philter.no/

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There are 6 comments.

  1. RebeccaCoffey Thatcher

    In reference to the question that Gandolf abandoned Frodo, didn’t he task Aragorn and the Rangers to keep an eye on the Shire while he is away? That isn’t abandonment.

    • #1
    • February 10, 2020, at 9:10 AM PST
    • 1 like
  2. Craig Hanks Contributor

    RebeccaCoffey (View Comment):

    In reference to the question that Gandolf abandoned Frodo, didn’t he task Aragorn and the Rangers to keep an eye on the Shire while he is away? That isn’t abandonment.

    Excellent point.

    • #2
    • February 10, 2020, at 9:27 AM PST
    • Like
  3. Arahant Member

    Y’all need to tackle James Branch Cabell’s Jurgen and his other works at some point. He hid a sonnet in Jurgen.

    I would also love to hear y’all tackle Horace Walpole’s Castle of Otranto.

    What you’re looking for in speaking of poetry is that JRRT was a “formalist” poet. Also, JRRT had many syntactical inversions, which is also looked down on by modern poets. Good point about poetry’s being used to pass down history through oral tradition. Before we could write things down, we needed easy ways to remember the stories, and the mnemonic devices of poetry contributed to being able to do that.

    There are plenty of ways to write a fantasy book, and all of them involve journeys of discovery. The only questions are how and when the discovery takes place.

    • #3
    • February 10, 2020, at 9:39 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  4. RebeccaCoffey Thatcher

    Megan, I’m with you in that I’m not a poetry lover but poems in The Lord of the Rings add an enriching layer to the story. They are almost our Middle Earth textbook. 

    • #4
    • February 10, 2020, at 9:56 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  5. Craig Hanks Contributor

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Y’all need to tackle James Branch Cabell’s Jurgen and his other works at some point. He hid a sonnet in Jurgen.

    I would also love to hear y’all tackle Horace Walpole’s Castle of Otranto.

    What you’re looking for in speaking of poetry is that JRRT was a “formalist” poet. Also, JRRT had many syntactical inversions, which is also looked down on by modern poets. Good point about poetry’s being used to pass down history through oral tradition. Before we could write things down, we needed easy ways to remember the stories, and the mnemonic devices of poetry contributed to being able to do that.

    There are plenty of ways to write a fantasy book, and all of them involve journeys of discovery. The only questions are how and when the discovery takes place.

    THANK YOU. I couldn’t come up with “formalist” on the spot. You’d think I’d edit myself into sounding smart, but I don’t have the time for that. :)

    • #5
    • February 10, 2020, at 3:03 PM PST
    • 1 like
  6. Arahant Member

    Craig Hanks (View Comment):
    I couldn’t come up with “formalist” on the spot.

    I’m a bit of one myself.

    • #6
    • February 10, 2020, at 4:49 PM PST
    • Like