to_tell_the_truth

It’s an eclectic week in the faculty lounge, as Epstein and Yoo take your questions on a wide variety of topics: Should the courts be able to prevent the release of the Planned Parenthood videos? Is the law finally going to catch up with Hillary Clinton? What would the professors change about the U.S. Constitution? And is John Yoo distressed by runaway inflation at McDonald’s? Those are just a few of the many queries they get to this week.Also, it’s the day you’ve all been waiting for: Richard Epstein finally explains why Roman riparian law is so important. Don’t say we didn’t warn you.

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There are 9 comments.

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  1. Sabrdance Member

    Huzzah!

    • #1
    • August 13, 2015, at 10:09 AM PDT
    • Like
  2. Jordan Inactive

    Thanks so much for that treatment of nullification.

    It’s very hard to find info about this topic with… shall we say, a degree of insanity.

    • #2
    • August 13, 2015, at 12:47 PM PDT
    • Like
  3. gts109 Member

    Thanks for discussing my depressing question. Your answers gave me some hope!

    • #3
    • August 13, 2015, at 12:59 PM PDT
    • Like
  4. jmelvin Member

    Jordan Wiegand:Thanks so much for that treatment of nullification.

    It’s very hard to find info about this topic with… shall we say, a degree of insanity.

    Agreed. Thank you for covering that topic!

    • #4
    • August 14, 2015, at 12:42 PM PDT
    • Like
  5. The Evergreen Man Inactive

    Always enlightening.

    • #5
    • August 14, 2015, at 2:59 PM PDT
    • Like
  6. Dorothea Inactive

    Thank you for the discussion of judicial terms for the Supreme Court (federal courts too).

    • #6
    • August 14, 2015, at 8:25 PM PDT
    • Like
  7. Rick O'Shea in Texas Inactive

    Finally, Law Talk deviates into my wheelhouse:

    My advice to John Yoo: don’t order 2 single hamburgers to build a double, you are paying too much. Order: McDouble, only cheddar, only onions. (If you want to get a “sort-of Big Mac” from dollar menu order: McDouble, only lettuce, only Mac sauce, only pickles).

    • #7
    • August 17, 2015, at 3:05 AM PDT
    • Like
  8. LibertyDefender Member

    gts109:Thanks for discussing my depressing question. Your answers gave me some hope!

    (italics added) Depressing though it may have been, the question was indeed your question. Yours. Our host, emcee, and star of the show credited you as the source of the question. Yes – it was your question.

    On the other hand, Troy mentioned in passing that

    “… there was another question in there that asked ‘if you could add a sentence to the constitution what would it be’ … ?”

    That poor, orphaned “another question in there.”

    • #8
    • August 17, 2015, at 10:42 PM PDT
    • Like
  9. Tom Meyer, Common Citizen Contributor

    Jon’s answer that federal power — particularly, police power — is ripe for pruning was certainly a surprise.

    • #9
    • August 18, 2015, at 10:29 AM PDT
    • Like