Composite photo: Shutterstock and Axiom Strategies.

Fresh off the win for his client in the Virginia’s Governor race, Republican strategist and campaign manager Jeff Roe sits down with David Drucker to talk about turning the Commonwealth from +10 Biden to +2 Youngkin, and looks forward to the next two election cycles.

Roe is blunt (and explicit) about Joe Biden and the coming midterms, as well as the 800 lb. gorilla in the room for the 2024 Republican nomination for president – who might be able to challenge that – and who might be just be nothing more than a pretender.

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Published in: Elections, Politics

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There are 17 comments.

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  1. Alex Rosenwald Editor
    Alex Rosenwald
    @alex

    Excellent pod!

    • #1
  2. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    A very incisive podcast.  I didn’t like the conclusion that Trump was unbeatable right now for the Republican nomination, but it was helpful to get a reality check.  Ugh.  

    The only two Republicans who could take out Trump are DeSantis and Cruz, but they are at a significant disadvantage. 

    Sometimes the best podcasts are ones that question your hopes and beliefs.  

    • #2
  3. Columbo Member
    Columbo
    @Columbo

    Very interesting dialogue. And I do believe that there are things to build upon to kick the dems out in 2022 and 2024. It is all about the America is Great platform, not necessarily Donald Trump as the flag bearer, because he is so unpalatable to such a large segment of American voters (due solely to the Dem-Media industrial complex). The democrats have long shed their previous facade of still being pro-America and pro-Capitalism.

    And whoever the candidate is, they do have to be a fighter, or they are not fit for this battle.

    • #3
  4. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    Columbo (View Comment):

    Very interesting dialogue. And I do believe that there are things to build upon to kick the dems out in 2022 and 2024. It is all about the America is Great platform, not necessarily Donald Trump as the flag bearer, because he is so unpalatable to such a large segment of American voters (due solely to Trump’s behavior the Dem-Media industrial complex). The democrats have long shed their previous facade of still being pro-America and pro-Capitalism.

    And whoever the candidate is, they do have to be a fighter, or they are not fit for this battle.

    FIFY.  Other than that correction, I find myself in agreement with you.

    • #4
  5. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    Gary Robbins: FIFY

    How many times does the media have to lie to you before you get just a little bit suspicious of their motives? 

    • #5
  6. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    His assessment on going after Trump ideologically, focusing in on abortion – do you not realize people’s minds can be changed? That was my first post here on Ricochet just before the election. I couldn’t understand why people were being so antagonistic towards Trump on previously held beliefs ESPECIALLY when Christians are dominant in the pro-life movement and believe that people CAN change.

    Trump is the first president in US history to go to a pro life March. He was not the first president to CLAIM to being pro life.

    I have a question for Mr. Roe – is ideological consistency more important than actual follow through on policy and action? Do actions speak louder than words?  If Trump ideologically does not have consistency on abortion, then why is it that he did all the standard Republican politician things and then some? Do you really think promoting cardboard cutouts that have been groomed for office to say all the right things (but in unguarded moments, slip up because they don’t actually believe any of it) with perfect consistency will trump someone with no consistency but all the right instincts?

    Trump might have sideways views on abortion, trans bathrooms, and gun control, but his instincts were to let the states decide. What is ideologically wrong about that? And do you really think Cruz pushing back on federalism would have won him anything?

    • #6
  7. Eugene Kriegsmann Member
    Eugene Kriegsmann
    @EugeneKriegsmann

    I have never been a Trump fan even though I voted for him in 2020. I was hoping that he would simply back off and let someone else run as the Republican. However, listening to Roe’s “rant” it became obvious as to why Trump would take the nomination easily, if he wants it, and, if Roe is right, he will take the presidency as well. Roe listed some real gut-wrenching issues that Trump would go after that none of the other possibilities, other than, perhaps Desantis, would likely avoid. The tide in this country is running very high in the direction of the left, at least culturally. Turning that tide will take someone unafraid to say the politically incorrect things. Trump is that person, probably for all the reasons I find him so unpleasant, but I will vote for him if he runs. 

    • #7
  8. DrewInWisconsin, Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    If we are to survive as a nation, then the future of the country must lie in the rise of the states and a diminishing federal leviathan.

    • #8
  9. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    1. It wasn’t Covid that derailed Democrats but Democrats exposing themselves as the arrogant, authoritarian, lying SOBs that they are. When they portray themselves as patriotic moderates who want unity and bipartisanship, they are lying. 

    2. People don’t like being lied to; however, lefties don’t mind a lie that furthers their goals. In that case, they know the spin is a lie so they don’t feel lied to. Everything about candidate Biden was a lie and they knew it; however, the unwashed rubes weren’t smart enough to vote “correctly” unless the lies were pushed. NTs lied about Trump for the same reason. They were also some of the rubes that believed the lies about Biden’s fitness. Nothing about this cluster… we are in now was worth their feelings. The fastest way for them to be rid of Trump was to let him get his 8 years then retire. 

    3. Dems never learn that their ideology is wrong. They just celebrate each win, look at each loss as a speed bump, then wait until they return to power to continue their long march. They know voters have a short attention span so no matter how bad the thumping they get, they just stay the course. That is why I don’t share his optimism that a butt kicking in 3022 and 2024 will have long-term consequences on Democrats  

    Interesting podcast  

     

    • #9
  10. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Eugene Kriegsmann (View Comment):

    I have never been a Trump fan even though I voted for him in 2020. I was hoping that he would simply back off and let someone else run as the Republican. However, listening to Roe’s “rant” it became obvious as to why Trump would take the nomination easily, if he wants it, and, if Roe is right, he will take the presidency as well. Roe listed some real gut-wrenching issues that Trump would go after that none of the other possibilities, other than, perhaps Desantis, would likely avoid. The tide in this country is running very high in the direction of the left, at least culturally. Turning that tide will take someone unafraid to say the politically incorrect things. Trump is that person, probably for all the reasons I find him so unpleasant, but I will vote for him if he runs.

    A. J. Pierzynski. Loud mouthed instigator of a catcher with the Twins. Hated that guy. Then he came to play for the White Sox during their world series winning year in 2005. Helluva guy! What cute antics! How can anybody hate AJ?!?

    • #10
  11. Eugene Kriegsmann Member
    Eugene Kriegsmann
    @EugeneKriegsmann

    Ed G. (View Comment):

    A. J. Pierzynski. Loud mouthed instigator of a catcher with the Twins. Hated that guy. Then he came to play for the White Sox during their world series winning year in 2005. Helluva guy! What cute antics! How can anybody hate AJ?!?

    It ultimately comes down to the same idea of my lawyer I like, the rest can be buried to their necks. The same can be said about congressmen and senators. Perspective is everything.

    • #11
  12. Franco Member
    Franco
    @Franco

    I had the same reaction as @Stina pretty much

    Republican consultants and politicos are always 4-10 years behind. They are the generals fighting the last war, and even knowing this is a pitfall, are condemned to the thinking because they have nothing to replace it with.

    So this guy gets half the lesson, maybe.

    First, any reference to populism or populist is a giant red flag. These people throw that word around liberally, but they can’t really define it. They don’t want to define it because it starts to sound like ‘popular’, in other words -what ordinary people (which include Republican voters) want.

    Can’t have that! We are Republicans, electing representatives who are smarter than we are and will go against popular proposals if they are deemed to be wrong

    Paraphrasing a long convoluted question from the host: “knowing what you know now, what would you have done differently 2016”? He gives us a jewel around 18:00 –

    “the long embrace of Trump instead of  going after him ideologically…. populist policies that aligned with conservative values gave him a bridge to the conservative voter that we didn’t really see coming, and because he’s so brash… he got past this hurdle that typically outsider candidates have to get through ( it’s Roe v. Wade and gun control) . Because he was saying populist things that churned the loins of the conservative activist…”

    Ya mean, he said he’d do things that conservative voters were asking for? Real things that affect them and not things they and posture about but have little authority to change? (looking at you Ted Cruz and GOP conservatives…) We didn’t see that coming?

    He didn’t understand why Romney failed as a candidate? Among the several main reasons; he was too ideological and platitudinal. Conservative voters don’t trust guys like Romney – even in 2012 – they say the right things but it becomes obvious they are really concerned with what they will actually fight for.

    Ordinary voters have not been primed with enough knowledge to understand the distinctions conservative ideology provides, and get bored. The debate stage with 14 candidates sucking up to left-wing operatives posing as journalists with two-minute answers  is not where you can educate people on conservatism.

    He didn’t see that coming? Well, that proves he wasn’t listening to vast numbers of Republican and potential Republican voters.

    Romney was all over the place on that issue anyway. Roe V. Wade is a great talking point, but it’s not in a Presidents direct control, so he can always throw up his hands and tell conservative voters “we need more Republicans in the Senate”, or something. Besides, while there are passionate advocates who really care about the abortion issue, unfortunately, it’s not an issue that will ever decide a Presidential election, other than Democrats being able to rally their base and fear-mongering.

    Continued –

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • #12
  13. Franco Member
    Franco
    @Franco

    The smart thing to do is just talk about the judges and avoid the debate. America is not a debating society, unfortunately GOP consultants. Well, they know this but still couch it in terms of wee lost but only because Americans or Democrats, or Independents, don’t understand what we are (essentially) lecturing them about. Poor us! Next campaignHad run made a huge issue over this and as a result somehow gotten the nomination, the campaign would be framed on the abortion issued, would have flamed-out, and Hillary would still be our President today.

    It seems all of these people make exactly the same errors on DJT and surrounding issues. Somehow, Trump has always been telling the absolute God’s-honest-truth about his feelings and ideas when he was a private citizen talking off-the-cuff to his paid biographer; lying through his teeth now as a politician. I submit he was lying and hedging and fudging before, trying to gain maximum advantage for his businesses, many in Democrat strongholds, and (very possibly) telling the truth as a now. The other possibility is he’s always lying and posturing like every politician. Is Trump held to a higher standard coming from a private sector background?

    Maybe the conservatives are now less interested in what a politician believes personally and more interested in what he will do. The consultant touched on these things, but I’m not sure he fully grasps the aspects I’m focusing on. We are in a fight. And have been for some time. The guy who realized this won the 2016. Is he capitalizing on the zeitgeist? Yes! That’s democracy.

    As Stina says, people change their minds as they grow more wise. As a businessman, you have to play it safe on certain issues. All the gay stuff, abortion, and to a lesser extent, gun control. As a businessman and celebrity Trump didn’t ruffle feathers. No reason to, and it’s smart. We all do it. I’m not going to get into an argument with a pink haired twenty-something in the lunch room about abortion or some LGBTQueeR issue. But the GOP insiders hold that against Trump and the rest of us, even while they are totally cowed and supplicant themselves! As though if Trump hasn’t been a champion for every conservative cause his entire life excludes him from consideration. Or, if he can’t articulate those beliefs as well as Mitt Romney can (not considering how Romney governed) he’s unfit.

    The GOP ideologues should be celebrating conversions and accepting them –  warily at first, perhaps – but Ronald Reagan had been a Democrat too. His Vice-President, George Bush was always a Republican. Hmmmm. They like the always Republicans, but us voters don’t necessarily like them so much.

     

    • #13
  14. Franco Member
    Franco
    @Franco

    My own observations regarding Trump circa 2015, was he would be unfairly attacked by Democrats and that would make him react and side with conservatives. That is exactly what happened – that is if Trump was not already a conservative trying to navigate his private, celebrity and business life, and at some point got bored and wanted to do some good politically (not unlike everyone who has ever run for political office)

    In 2016 I thought Democrats might be able to get many of their wishes enacted by flattering and accommodating Trump, but two things prevented that. Trump, as a businessman is highly trained to see through ploys and artifice, and Democrats don’t really care about any of these issues, are just using them as wedges.

     Politicians live in a sea, or a cesspool, of ploys and posture, they’ve lost their sense of smell. Businessmen also engage in deceptive practices, but they seek to find win-win situations, they can’t thrive doing this for very long, but politicians can endlessly posture.

    They don’t have to deliver a product. They only have to deliver excuses.  

    Trumps weakness (God bless him) was not understanding the pervasiveness and depth of bureaucratic evil throughout our federal government. When DJT is criticized by Republicans for not navigating these channels, well, I have utter contempt. 

    This means we will always have to nominate an insider who has already corrupted himself.

    Our democracy needs outsiders. It is deigned for outsiders. The GOP insiders should be open to accepting change and accepting these concepts rather than labeling them “populist” and driving away.

     

     

     

     

     

    • #14
  15. Columbo Member
    Columbo
    @Columbo

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Columbo (View Comment):

    Very interesting dialogue. And I do believe that there are things to build upon to kick the dems out in 2022 and 2024. It is all about the America is Great platform, not necessarily Donald Trump as the flag bearer, because he is so unpalatable to such a large segment of American voters (due solely to Trump’s behavior the Dem-Media industrial complex). The democrats have long shed their previous facade of still being pro-America and pro-Capitalism.

    And whoever the candidate is, they do have to be a fighter, or they are not fit for this battle.

    FIFY. Other than that correction, I find myself in agreement with you.

    BZZZZZZZZ!!! Wrong answer McFly!

    • #15
  16. Columbo Member
    Columbo
    @Columbo

    3

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Columbo (View Comment):

    Very interesting dialogue. And I do believe that there are things to build upon to kick the dems out in 2022 and 2024. It is all about the America is Great platform, not necessarily Donald Trump as the flag bearer, because he is so unpalatable to such a large segment of American voters (due solely to Trump’s behavior the Dem-Media industrial complex). The democrats have long shed their previous facade of still being pro-America and pro-Capitalism.

    And whoever the candidate is, they do have to be a fighter, or they are not fit for this battle.

    FIFY. Other than that correction, I find myself in agreement with you.

    You are still trapped by your delusions. In spite of how so many fellow Ricocheti have tried to reason with you, you refuse to accept reason and fact and ignorantly hold on to your unsustainable beliefs, and find yourself alone as a Japanese soldier after WWII has been ended. Not a pretty sight!

    • #16
  17. Jager Coolidge
    Jager
    @Jager

    Franco (View Comment):
    He didn’t see that coming? Well, that proves he wasn’t listening to vast numbers of Republican and potential Republican voters

    Republicans since Reagan was in office have been complaining about the border and about illegal immigration. They had to shut down Pres. Bush immigration reform and Rubio’s gang of 8. 

    We have not been hiding what we wanted. Conservative voters have remained pretty consistent in our positions. Our thoughts on freedom of religion, small government the 2nd Amendment are all largely unchanged for decades.

     

    • #17
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