Supply chain issues in conjunction with rising prices continue to clear shelves, idle factories, and take a toll on the wallets of working Americans. The Biden administration falsely insists these problems are transitory and blames the pandemic or the people trying to fix the problems. But this crisis is here to stay as long as the administration continues to push policies that make it worse. On this episode of Heritage Explains Live, we talk with Heritage trade economist Tori Whiting. She breaks down the basics, catches us up on where things currently stand, and takes your questions. THIS IS WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW!

This week, Dean Cheng, a research fellow in Heritage’s Asian Studies Center, breaks down the situation between China and Taiwan and what the United States should do about it.


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**The special episode of Heritage Explains was recorded LIVE on Facebook and YouTube**

Is our supply chain collapsing? This week, Brent Sadler, a senior fellow in Heritage’s Center for National Defense, explains the reason behind today’s shipping backlogs and why it could lead to national security concerns.


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The Biden administration’s historic crisis at the southern border has reached a fever pitch in Del Rio, TX. The most frustrating part is that it was entirely avoidable. Now thousands are suffering from the administration’s foolish push for open borders, and the consequences of this predictable disaster will surely be lasting and painful for America. On this episode, we talk about how Del Rio is just a snapshot of what’s happen at the southern border, and what is likely to happen if this path continues. In addition, we talk about The Democrat’s attempt to use budget gimmicks in Congress to set millions of illegal immigrants on a pathway to citizenship.


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How woke is your workplace? This week on “Heritage Explains,” Christopher Rufo, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and former Heritage visiting fellow, explains what critical race theory is and how it’s dividing America.


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Is Roe v. Wade over? How does this new law in Texas work exactly? What did the Supreme Court say about this law? Our guest, Sarah Perry, a legal fellow in Heritage’s Meese Center, explains.


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It’s been 20 years since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. It’s hard to describe in a short blurb what that day has meant for Americans, and all that has changed because of it. So this week, we wanted to take a special look at and acknowledge the calamity, chaos, and confusion, but also look at the tremendous heroism of first responders, men and woman in uniform, and the incredible charity displayed by everyday Americans. We also talk with Steve Bucci. He was the military assistant to Sec. Donald Rumsfeld on September 11, and recounts being in the Pentagon when the plane hit including the great story of Sec. Rumsfeld pulling wounded people out of the Pentagon. He saw (first hand) the best of Americans in the face of such incredibly dark circumstances. Given the incredibly challenging circumstances we are currently facing in Afghanistan, Bucci also calls on policymakers to be bold in addressing the threats we face today.

This week, Luke Coffey, an Afghanistan war veteran and director of Heritage’s Alison Center for Foreign Policy, answers questions about what’s happening in Afghanistan and what could come next


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Michelle and I have been looking back on the great success of the bi partisan welfare reform act of 1996. In Part 1, Robert Rector told us that in order to serve the 1 in 7 American children who were dependent on government aid, we needed to do two things: first: require work in exchange for welfare, and second: strengthen families. In part 2, we heard that as a result of achieving these, welfare caseloads (which had not dropped significantly in 50 years) promptly fell by 60%, the child poverty rate suddenly dropped by a third (after being static for a quarter century), and the poverty rate for single-parent families has dropped by two-thirds since reform. But the Biden Administration and liberals in Congress are trying to upend these incredible successes, by giving welfare to people under the name of “tax credits”, and requiring virtually nothing to get it. On this episode, Former Senator Rick Santorum joins us to talk about his role in passing welfare reform in 1996, and what we must do to pushback against The Left’s attempt to rob people of the dignity of work.

This week, we break down the Biden administration’s plans to expand welfare. Jason Turner, executive director at Secretaries’ Innovation Group, joins us for the second part of our series on welfare 25 years after the 1996 bipartisan reform. 


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It’s been 25 years since President Clinton signed into law sweeping welfare reform. But while this massive bi-partisan victory did a lot to strengthen families and sanction the dignity of work from the highest levels of government, a victory 25 years ago doesn’t not necessarily mean victory for the next 25 years. Today, President Biden and liberals in Congress are now looking to completely end these successful reforms, and replace them with policies that have been proven not to work. On this episode, we look at the lead up to welfare reform, the politics, the posturing, and of course the success. In addition, we look at the current situation here in DC and why it’s crucial to pushback against the left’s attempts to upend welfare reform.

 

This week, research fellow Rachel Greszler explains how the declining birthrate affects the U.S. economy.


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Remember HR 1 or S 1, the so-called “For the People Act?” We’ve done several episodes about it here on Explains where we’ve talked about how, if passed, it would fundamentally change America by letting DC control our elections instead of the states. Since our last episode, Democrat Sen. Joe Manchin from West Virginia actually wrote an op-ed digging his heels in, and rejected H.R. 1/S. 1. Or did he? Have you heard of H.R. 4? It’s been described as the “backdoor” to the “For the People Act.” The problem is that it might be worse. This week, we discuss the differences between H.R. 1 and H.R. 4, the state of play, and all that is at stake.

This week, Jarrett Stepman, a contributor to The Daily Signal will break down why Cubans have had enough, why protestors are waving American flags, and what Americans can learn from these protests.


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Leaks of sensitive government information happen all the time, and some would say leaking is a virtuous thing that promotes better transparency. But there are serious ramifications. On this episode, we look at how leaks typically happen, the consequences, and discuss why it’s important for our law enforcement to use all the available tools to hunt leakers down.

It’s that time of year when we celebrate our Declaration of Independence. On this episode, we play an interview featuring well-known historian, scholar, and Heritage fellow Dr. Allen Guelzo. It encapsulates why Independence Day is so important, and gives meaningful context into the complexity and deliberation of this “miracle” of a document.  Try this: listen to this episode first, and then read the Declaration in full. It’s worth it!


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What would our military be like if Marines were taught to assess their fellow marines’ trustworthiness or capability based on the color of their skin? This week, senior research fellow Dakota Wood talks about how woke policies like critical race theory would destroy the military.


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The Chinese Communist Party recently announced they will increase the number of children families are allowed to have from two to three. This comes after historically low birth rates last year, and growing concerns that China will not have a population to keep up with the growth. But will it work? It poses the fundamental question: Does the family support government or does government support the family? This week, we talk about China’s vested interest in controlling personal family decisions, how the US should respond, and why a three-child policy will not help the Chinese People.

China emitted more carbon dioxide than any other country in 2019—nearly double that of the United States. This week Katie Tubb, a senior policy analyst for energy in the Roe Institute for Economic Policy Studies, talks about what climate game China is playing and why the US needs to keep its eyes wide open.


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