Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for November 14, 2017, it’s the Overseas Trump edition of the show with your hosts, Hartford CT radio maven Todd Feinburg and all things nano person Mike Stopa. This week, we have a Filipino flavor to the podcast in honor of Trump’s visit to and bromance beginning with Rodrigo Duterte. And, in the latest edition of the Florida man saga, who is Ja Du and why does he think, in spite of all evidence to the contrary, that he is Filipino? Isn’t he culturally appropriating? Does he need a bathroom all his own? And, more seriously, why does someone who “identifies” as a different race or ethnicity need to *be* that race or ethnicity? Isn’t it enough to simply *like* Filipino food, clothing, dance, and culture? Why does Ja Du need to actually *be* Filipino? Is it possibly more a denial of his own culture – a need to rebel – that is driving him to insist that his real ethnicity is something else?

We then get into the developing relationship between Duterte and Trump. Are they, perhaps, a match made in heaven? Who are the forgotten people of the Philippines? Isn’t the system there rigged far worse than the system here?

But the horse is behind the cart here, because our first topic concerns an Albanian national in Connecticut who is being ejected from the U.S. (save for a last minute stay) for immigration violations. But she is married to an American guy. Don’t Americans get to marry people from any country they want and have them become U.S. green card holders if not citizens?

And, on the same topic, are we more sympathetic instinctively to Europeans with immigration problems than we are with Latin Americans? Has the invasion of poverty and uneducated people from south of the border *made us* racist?

We will have our shower thoughts. The podcast image this week is from wordclouds.com and represents Donald Trump’s inauguration speech. This little gem represents Obama’s farewell speech.

Our hidden gem? Badge by Cream!

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There are 4 comments.

  1. Coolidge

    Stopa “Well I’m definitely bigoted”

    Me: “He can never run for office again”

    • #1
    • November 15, 2017 at 9:14 am
    • Like
  2. Podcaster

    JeffHawkins (View Comment):
    Stopa “Well I’m definitely bigoted”

    Me: “He can never run for office again”

    And I’m a hater too!!!

    • #2
    • November 16, 2017 at 9:51 am
    • Like
  3. Coolidge

    On the question of sending the best, a Greek friend once told me that all the Greeks who want to work have left Greece. And that’s why Greece has a terrible economy.

    On the question of respect for the law, many illegal and legal aliens come from very corrupt countries. Growing up in that sort of country, it’s reasonable to not have a respect for the law. This is one of the problems with the assimilation of our large number of immigrants.

    On the Albanian alien, I have a problem with making exceptions for a small number of sympathetic illegals because immigration laws are widely ignored. This can be used as another excuse to not enforce the law.

    On the question of not favoring south of the border immigrants, I see the problem as a language one. With so many immigrants speaking one language, there is less pressure to learn English, which I see as the biggest obstacle to assimilation. But some people south of the border don’t have the condition, such as Brazilians and Haitians.

    I’m glad that at least one of you is not a Lamarckian and knows the damage Lamarckism has done.

    • #3
    • November 16, 2017 at 9:55 am
    • Like
  4. Podcaster

    FredGoodhue (View Comment):
    On the question of sending the best, a Greek friend once told me that all the Greeks who want to work have left Greece. And that’s why Greece has a terrible economy.

    On the question of respect for the law, many illegal and legal aliens come from very corrupt countries. Growing up in that sort of country, it’s reasonable to not have a respect for the law. This is one of the problems with the assimilation of our large number of immigrants.

    On the Albanian alien, I have a problem with making exceptions for a small number of sympathetic illegals because immigration laws are widely ignored. This can be used as another excuse to not enforce the law.

    On the question of not favoring south of the border immigrants, I see the problem as a language one. With so many immigrants speaking one language, there is less pressure to learn English, which I see as the biggest obstacle to assimilation. But some people south of the border don’t have the condition, such as Brazilians and Haitians.

    I’m glad that at least one of you is not a Lamarckian and knows the damage Lamarckism has done.

    Great points all, Fred. But one counter-point: I have numerous friends and colleagues who are/were for example chemistry grad students at Harvard and who were from Mexico (their adviser was Mexican). They had every bit as much respect for the law as you or I do. They understood the *principle* of respect for the law. Most of the (especially recent) illegal aliens from Mexico are from Oaxaca – which has a high population of “indigenous peoples” and a low rate of education, income, and, I suspect, respect for the law. That’s who’s coming here.

    • #4
    • November 16, 2017 at 10:06 pm
    • 1 like