Well it worked for the Long Blockchain nee Island Ice Tea Corporation, why can’t it work for us? The former Harvard Lunch Club Political podcast is now the Harvard Bitcoin Club Podcast…or maybe it’s the Harvard Lunch Club Bitcoin podcast…we’re not sure yet. But the Long Island Iced Tea Company tripled their share price last month after catching the bitcoin wave with a catchy name change to go along with their business model change. So we too are going for it!

In this edition of the Harvard Bitcoin Club podcast we talk about…Bitcoin! and then some more about bitcoin! and then (to show how flexible we are) we talk about racism and Donald Trump.

Last week, founding father Peter Robinson posted on Ricochet an email Mike sent to him with my brief explanation of bitcoin – how it works, why is it worth anything, and what will it be worth tomorrow. You can find it here. Thanks Peter!

You should equally check out the comments where the great Ricochetti once again displayed their depth and erudition. You know there are a lot of smart, well-informed people out there!

In the future we will, on the Harvard Lunch Club page, um, er, the Harvard Bitcoin Club page, have a page of explanations and links to the bitcoin literature that embellishes on my short explanation. But for now, enjoy and comment and please recommend us to your friends and on iTunes!

In addition to our shower thoughts (natch!) our hidden gem this time (and it’s pretty well hidden, believe me) is that smash hit “Om Asatoma” by Deva Premal.

Cheers!

 

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There are 6 comments.

  1. Coolidge

    Great podcast, very informative.

    Just 1 question – not really on bit coin – but on the electronic payments processing. Now the whole thing about cell phone meta data tracking is that because a 3rd party (the phone company) has a record of a call there is no expectation of privacy. Thus the government can scoop up the meta data of your phone call. (numbers dialed, locations(possibly) and duration etc) Now given that there is a 3rd party record with all electronic transactions, you therefore should have no expectation of privacy. Do you think that the government is scooping up all the “Meta data” of all electronic transactions?

    • #1
    • January 18, 2018 at 7:48 am
    • Like
  2. Podcaster

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):
    Great podcast, very informative.

    Just 1 question – not really on bit coin – but on the electronic payments processing. Now the whole thing about cell phone meta data tracking is that because a 3rd party (the phone company) has a record of a call there is no expectation of privacy. Thus the government can scoop up the meta data of your phone call. (numbers dialed, locations(possibly) and duration etc) Now given that there is a 3rd party record with all electronic transactions, you therefore should have no expectation of privacy. Do you think that the government is scooping up all the “Meta data” of all electronic transactions?

    Thanks very much!

    I’m not entirely sure of the answer to your question. Bitcoin transactions are conducted on the internet. So they are not phone calls. Nevertheless, no doubt the government can intercept such messages including origin and destination. But can they identify those messages as bitcoin transactions? I doubt it. Add to that the fact that the transaction ledger (i.e. the blockchain) is a public entity anyway and I am not sure if they would want to…unless they were perhaps trying to specify the owner of a particular wallet. Again, sorry but not sure.

    • #2
    • January 18, 2018 at 12:12 pm
    • Like
  3. Coolidge

    Michael Stopa (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):
    Great podcast, very informative.

    Just 1 question – not really on bit coin – but on the electronic payments processing. Now the whole thing about cell phone meta data tracking is that because a 3rd party (the phone company) has a record of a call there is no expectation of privacy. Thus the government can scoop up the meta data of your phone call. (numbers dialed, locations(possibly) and duration etc) Now given that there is a 3rd party record with all electronic transactions, you therefore should have no expectation of privacy. Do you think that the government is scooping up all the “Meta data” of all electronic transactions?

    Thanks very much!

    I’m not entirely sure of the answer to your question. Bitcoin transactions are conducted on the internet. So they are not phone calls. Nevertheless, no doubt the government can intercept such messages including origin and destination. But can they identify those messages as bitcoin transactions? I doubt it. Add to that the fact that the transaction ledger (i.e. the blockchain) is a public entity anyway and I am not sure if they would want to…unless they were perhaps trying to specify the owner of a particular wallet. Again, sorry but not sure.

    No, you kinda missed the point of the question… In normal electronic bank transactions (debit, credit cards etc) not bitcoin – do you think the government could be scooping up all the banking transaction data using the same legal theory that it scoops up all cell phone data? Namely the expectation of privacy, just like with a cell phone, the vendor’s bank and your bank both have a record of your transaction – thus there should be no expectation of privacy. Do you think the government is scooping up all that data?

    Banks are highly regulated and a very susceptible to regulatory blackmail, as we have seen with “Operation Choke Point” which attempted to deprive otherwise legal (but unpopular) business access to banking services, thus reducing their ability to receive payments from prospective customers.

    • #3
    • January 18, 2018 at 6:14 pm
    • Like
  4. Coolidge

    News item in BBC Science Focus #316, Christmas 2017:

    23 TERAWATT HOURS

    The amount of energy used globally by Bitcoin miners each year. That’s just short of the 24.8 terawatt hours generated by renewable energy worldwide in 2016.

    • #4
    • January 18, 2018 at 11:07 pm
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  5. Member

    @34:40…they end the bitcoin nonsense and the podcast actually begins.

    • #5
    • January 19, 2018 at 8:12 am
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  6. Member

    @45:33-46:49…perfectly encapsulated. Nicely done, Feinburg :-)

    • #6
    • January 19, 2018 at 9:32 am
    • 1 like