Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for February 27, 2018, number 164! It’s the Double Trump edition of the how with your humble hosts, radio guy Todd Feinburg and nanophysicist Mike Stopa. Today, Donald Trump announced at last what we’ve all been waiting for – that he is running for re-election! Well, you say, isn’t that a ways off? Didn’t he just, like, start being president a while ago? How often do they have to run, anyway? Is it two years or four now???

Well yeah. It’s four. But why wait? Donald Trump breaks the mold again. No one for a minute thinks that he *won’t* run for president in 2020. What, really, is the point of being coy about it? We will discuss.

And then, we discuss some of the aftermath of the Florida shooting. It deserves a few words. Todd points out that the statistics say that worrying about kids being murdered in school as compared to being killed in, say, a car crash is irrational. Mike counters that yes it is irrational, but that people are not rational. And there is a reason why fear of sudden violence is – against all reason – greater than fear of driving drunk. You tell us what is right here.

Please weigh in in the comments and vote on whose shower thought you like better. Mike has some deep ponderings about critical moments in life that cast our fate either one way or another as exemplified by the 1988 epic battle between Olympic figure skaters Brian Boitano and Brian Orser. Todd has a movie he wants to recommend. Please let us know which *you* think is more compelling.

Our hidden gem this week is from Manhattan Transfer: The Offbeat of the Avenues. Enjoy!

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There are 6 comments.

  1. Coolidge

    Mike’s shower thought was kinda the wrong point. I totally agree, a person;s life can be altered or destroyed in a moment. Instead of the Battle of the Brians his point would’ve been better illustrated by Deputy Scott Peterson. Here is a guy who’s in the Sheriffs department, presumably he’s a decent guy, he wants to help – does a good job. But then one Wednesday morning, a kid comes to where he’s on duty and shoots up the place… He calls it in, follows the directives from the office, and then in the aftermath gets pilloried in the press, thrown under the bus by his own management. Silenced by his management, under guard, under death threats.

    A reputation takes a lifetime to build, but only a moment to destroy.

    Now maybe this also a bad example because of how the threat assessments of this kid where handled by the Sheriff’s office.

    The Battle of the Brians was a dramatic moment for sure, probably a great rivalry, but nobody was destroyed in failure or corrupted by success. So it lacks the elements to be a great moral parable.

    • #1
    • February 28, 2018 at 12:13 pm
    • 1 like
  2. Member

    I’m very grateful to have had that hidden gem revealed. Listened to it 4 times now, found the lyrics, sung along. My shower thought would be to try to imagine the the wealth of experiences, understanding and appreciation such musicians get to experience at their level. This expands my picture of heaven. Thanks.

    • #2
    • February 28, 2018 at 12:26 pm
    • 2 likes
  3. Member

    The claim, which Mr. Feinberg admits does not ring true, the number of similar incidents (i.e., school shootings) is far below the 1990s rate is probably not correct. Quite the opposite: the current decade seems to be far worse. There are caveats but I doubt that they would reverse the answer from far above to far below.

    It may be true that there were more school killings (not necessarily shootings) or more mass killings in general. But the topic on the table is school shootings, not mass killings in general by any means.

    • #3
    • February 28, 2018 at 1:34 pm
    • 1 like
  4. Podcaster

    Marythefifth (View Comment):
    I’m very grateful to have had that hidden gem revealed. Listened to it 4 times now, found the lyrics, sung along. My shower thought would be to try to imagine the the wealth of experiences, understanding and appreciation such musicians get to experience at their level. This expands my picture of heaven. Thanks.

    When I first heard Manhattan Transfer I was enchanted. Glad you enjoyed it Mary!

    • #4
    • February 28, 2018 at 7:33 pm
    • Like
  5. Podcaster

    drlorentz (View Comment):
    The claim, which Mr. Feinberg admits does not ring true, the number of similar incidents (i.e., school shootings) is far below the 1990s rate is probably not correct. Quite the opposite: the current decade seems to be far worse. There are caveats but I doubt that they would reverse the answer from far above to far below.

    It may be true that there were more school killings (not necessarily shootings) or more mass killings in general. But the topic on the table is school shootings, not mass killings in general by any means.

    here’s the link, Dr. L.

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/feb/27/schools-safer-today-1990s-study-shootings-says/

    • #5
    • February 28, 2018 at 7:34 pm
    • Like
  6. Member

    I was in high school and remember the ’88 Olympic figure skating coverage vividly. I had not been following this Olympics. Upon hearing Mike’s shower thoughts, I paused the podcast and went and watched the documentary online. I enjoyed reliving those moments. I also understand the point Mike is trying to express. Thanks for highlighting the piece.

    • #6
    • March 4, 2018 at 12:34 pm
    • Like