There are 6 comments.

  1. Joe D. Lincoln

    Generation X is named after Billy Idol’s first band (which was named after a book) – who was punk at the time (like the Sex Pistols) – which were a rebellion against disco and stadium rock.

    We clearly don’t have any ownership of disco. According to wikipedia, the oldest Gen-Xers were born in 1971, and would have been like 13 when Disco was popular. The youngest Gen-Xers were born in 1981 when disco was in the rear view mirror.

    Sorry, you boomers own disco.

    • #1
    • November 12, 2019, at 6:56 AM PST
    • 1 like
  2. EtCarter Listener

    Joe D. (View Comment):
    Femsplainers Podcast S5E10

    Woke Me When It’s Over

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    The awesome Meghan Daum joins Christina & Danielle to discuss her new book “The Problem With Everything: My Journey Through the New Culture Wars.” PLUS Why drinking is good for your brain, ‘Ok Boomer’ warfare, and, er, um, vaginas.

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    Respectfully, I believe Douglas Coupland (author of Generation-X) began the generation as pre-1966, as Coupland is in that range. I have read almost all of his books and recommend “Bit-Rot” as a delightfully observant and quirky collection of short essays. 

    • #2
    • November 12, 2019, at 8:00 AM PST
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  3. Taras Coolidge

    The Femsplainers and their guest discuss the fact that relationships between young women and powerful older men are a two-way street.

    For evolutionary reasons, young women have a lot of power in relationships. I think it was Christina who, tongue in cheek, told her daughters that (until they’re thirty) they’re powerful as Bill Gates!

    They quote a woman who, reflecting on her past relationships, says that if it’s wrong to use power to get sex, it’s also wrong to use sex to get power.

    • #3
    • November 12, 2019, at 8:26 AM PST
    • 1 like
  4. Joe D. Lincoln

    EtCarter (View Comment):

    Joe D. (View Comment):
    Femsplainers Podcast S5E10

    Respectfully, I believe Douglas Coupland (author of Generation-X) began the generation as pre-1966, as Coupland is in that range. I have read almost all of his books and recommend “Bit-Rot” as a delightfully observant and quirky collection of short essays.

    Well, in general I imagine all generations are named by their predecessors.

    • #4
    • November 12, 2019, at 9:56 AM PST
    • 1 like
  5. EtCarter Listener

    Joe D. (View Comment):

    EtCarter (View Comment):

    Joe D. (View Comment):
    Femsplainers Podcast S5E10

    Respectfully, I believe Douglas Coupland (author of Generation-X) began the generation as pre-1966, as Coupland is in that range. I have read almost all of his books and recommend “Bit-Rot” as a delightfully observant and quirky collection of short essays.

    Well, in general I imagine all generations are named by their predecessors.

    Agreed. Sorry, if I sounded nitpicky. I liked your references to Billy Idols early band.

    • #5
    • November 12, 2019, at 1:02 PM PST
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  6. DJ EJ Member

    By the late ’70s and early ’80s, disco was definitely overexposed and oversaturated the market. Studio 54 had its own jeans label. Andy Williams, Dolly Parton, Frank Sinatra, Frankie Valli, The Rolling Stones, Rod Stewart, Ethel Merman, and Percy Faith (a disco version of “Hava Nagilah”) all recorded disco tracks.

    However, the music itself arose out of the psychedelic experiments of Sly and The Family Stone, the arrangements of Motown producer Norman Whitfield, Gamble and Huff’s Philadelphia orchestrations, funk, and Latin dance music. Influential forerunners and earliest disco tracks are Jerry Butler – Only The Strong Survive (1969) or One Night Affair (1972), Isaac Hayes – Theme from Shaft (1972), Manu Dibango – Soul Makossa (1972), The O’Jays – Love Train (1972), The Hues Corporation – Rock The Boat (1973), Harold Melvin and The Blue Notes – The Love I Lost (1973), and George McCrae – Rock Your Baby (1974).

    The dance club as we would conceive of it today (huge sound systems, lighting effects, DJ booths, continuously mixed songs) grew out of New York City’s underground gay and minority club scene that began around 1969 and took off in the early ’70s. The earliest influential DJs and club owners were Francis Grasso (b. 1949), David Mancuso (b. 1944), Nicky Siano (b. 1955), Larry Levan (b. 1954), and Frankie Knuckles (b. 1955). These are some of the people that originated modern DJing, the remix, and 12″ record singles – all aspects of disco music. By 1975 there were an estimated 150-200 disco clubs in New York City.

    So yes, by the late 1970’s Generation X could be involved in disco, when the music genre and the dance clubs that played it were well-established. However, love it or hate it, it was created by earlier generations.

    Bill Brewster and Frank Broughton – “Last Night a DJ Saved My Life: The History of the Disc Jockey” (1999) is a great reference for the history of disco, northern soul, reggae, hip-hop, house, garage, and techno music.

    • #6
    • November 12, 2019, at 6:54 PM PST
    • 1 like