Today we note that it was just about four years ago that this podcast went daily, and we consider the lasting impact of the pandemic and the prospects of a political reckoning. But before that, we get into the significance of Bernie Moreno’s primary win in Ohio and Donald Trump’s inability to make bond. We close on a discussion Joe Biden’s Israel policy and the forgotten goal of war: victory. Give a listen.

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Published in: General

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  1. WilliamWarford Coolidge
    WilliamWarford
    @WilliamWarford

    Yes, people were definitely more fatalistic 100 years ago, and also, they didn’t have 24-hour news cycles, crazy people on cable news, and social media. I did a bit of research in 2020-21 and found that the national media — at least as represented by the NYT — was almost blase about the flu pandemic in 1918-19.  They did not run stories every day, the stories they did run did not dominate the headlines. It was treated like any other important news story.

    Fast forward to 1957. Same thing – no media hysteria. Again, in the 1969 flu.

    Then I checked literature and found no references to the 1918-19 pandemic with the possible exception of Eliot in the The Waste Land (“I did not know that death had undone so many”). Gatsby, for example, was written in 1922 and mentions what characters did during the war and the years since. No mention of the pandemic. 

    Again, my research was limited, done out of curiosity, but from what I saw it seemed like the country took it all in stride back then.

    Also, excellent point about the people pursuing Trump being even more loathsome than he is. It takes a lot to make a sympathetic character of Trump, but somehow the left manages. 

    • #1
  2. Aaron Parmelee Member
    Aaron Parmelee
    @AaronParmelee

    My grandfather made fun of my mother when she caught the Hong Kong flu in 1969.

    • #2
  3. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    WilliamWarford (View Comment):

    Yes, people were definitely more fatalistic 100 years ago, and also, they didn’t have 24-hour news cycles, crazy people on cable news, and social media. I did a bit of research in 2020-21 and found that the national media — at least as represented by the NYT — was almost blase about the flu pandemic in 1918-19. They did not run stories every day, the stories they did run did not dominate the headlines. It was treated like any other important news story.

    Fast forward to 1957. Same thing – no media hysteria. Again, in the 1969 flu.

    Then I checked literature and found no references to the 1918-19 pandemic with the possible exception of Eliot in the The Waste Land (“I did not know that death had undone so many”). Gatsby, for example, was written in 1922 and mentions what characters did during the war and the years since. No mention of the pandemic.

    Again, my research was limited, done out of curiosity, but from what I saw it seemed like the country took it all in stride back then.

    Also, excellent point about the people pursuing Trump being even more loathsome than he is. It takes a lot to make a sympathetic character of Trump, but somehow the left manages.

    After reading more about the Spanish Flu (probably shouldn’t call it that anymore but what the heck), it is remarkable how little fiction of the 20s and 30s touch on the flu. Even though not that many US troops served in WW1, it is much more a part of the fiction of that time. I’m getting ready to read “They Came Like Swallows” by William Maxwell which is one of the few about the flu. There’s also a novella by Katherine Porter “Pale Horse, Pale Rider” and that’s about it.

    • #3
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