Heather Mac Donald joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss the dubious scientific and statistical bases of the trendy academic theory known as “implicit bias.” The implicit association test (IAT), first introduced in 1998, uses a computerized response-time test to measure an individual’s bias, particularly regarding race.

Despite scientific challenges to the test’s validity, the implicit-bias idea has taken firm root in popular culture and in the media. Police forces and corporate HR departments are spending millions every year reeducating employees on how to recognize their presumptive hidden prejudices.

Heather discusses the problems with implicit bias, the impact that the concept is having on academia and in the corporate world, and the real reasons for racial disparities in educational achievement and income levels.

Heather Mac Donald is the Thomas W. Smith Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a contributing editor of City Journal, and author of the New York Times bestseller The War on CopsHer article in the Autumn 2017 issue of City Journal is entitled, “Are We All Unconscious Racists?

City Journal is a magazine of urban affairs, published by the Manhattan Institute.

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There is 1 comment.

  1. Taras Coolidge

    Because the problem of group differences is insoluble, firms and government agencies required by law to solve it necessarily opt to make some kind of futile or even harmful — but socially acceptable — effort.
    “Implicit bias” training is, at least, relatively harmless.

    • #1
    • November 13, 2017, at 5:04 PM PST
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