Aaron Renn joins Seth Barron to discuss the divide between the country’s economically booming metro areas and its depressed non-urban and rural areas.

An Empire Center report released last month highlighted the disparity in job growth between “upstate” and “downstate” New York: of the 106,000 jobs created between April 2017 and April 2018, more than 85 percent of them were in the New York City metro area. Similar imbalances in urban-rural economic development can be found in Midwest states like Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, and Ohio, as well as in California and others.

Struggling towns across the country are attempting to revitalize their communities by following the examples of other regions that have rebounded. However, lingering local issues and global economic realities make competing with elite coastal cities a near-impossible task.

City Journal is a magazine of urban affairs, published by the Manhattan Institute.

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Published in: Domestic Policy

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  1. FredGoodhue Coolidge
    FredGoodhue
    @FredGoodhue

    I wonder if the social insularity of river cities is amplified in rural areas.  I can see how this this discourages people from moving to and staying in them.  I wonder if this attitude discourages people who already live there from moving to other cities to improve their economic lot.  Other podcasts have talked about how Americans do not move as much as they used to; especially people who grow up in economically depressed areas.

    • #1
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