Nicole Gelinas joins Seth Barron to discuss her research on New York subway ridership, the future of the city’s subways, and the decriminalization of fare-jumping, a reversal of a critical policing strategy that helped fight crime.

Subway ridership in New York has nearly doubled since 1977, but it’s not tourists packing the trains: it’s city residents. And New York’s poorest neighborhoods have seen the biggest growth in annual ridership over the last 30 years.

The subway’s future looks uncertain, though. Decades of storm damage, insufficient maintenance, and inadequate system upgrades have led to mounting delays and declining reliability. If city leadership doesn’t address the crisis, New York’s poorest residents will be most affected.

Subscribe to City Journal's 10 Blocks in iTunes (and leave a 5-star review, please!), or by RSS feed. For all our podcasts in one place, subscribe to the Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed in iTunes or by RSS feed.

There is 1 comment.

  1. Member

    Enjoyed this podcast as always. Also enjoyed your article on the Romanovs and the contrast with what happened to earlier royalty. The French did execute M Antoinette and the Dauphin disappeared but so much less than the Lenin and the Bolshiveks.

    • #1
    • July 18, 2018 at 11:21 am
    • Like