In this episode, we break down changes in our media diets that have been changed as a result of the pandemic and the tech market boom, and what will revert back to VERY pre-pandemic habits. John Podhoretz returns to our conversation. He’s been a prolific TV and film critic for over four decades. John is editor in chief of Commentary Magazine and host of Commentary’s award-winning daily podcast, he’s a columnist for the New York Post, a book author, and was film critic for the Weekly Standard and television critic for the New York Post.

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  1. FredGoodhue Coolidge
    FredGoodhue
    @FredGoodhue

    A while back I bought a DVD of early John Wayne movies.  They were all westerns with the same plot.  John Wayne is a loner who comes into the valley and meets the old man who has a small ranch threatened by the richest man in the valley (all 1930s screenwriters were communists, so the villain is always wealthy).  John Wayne saves the ranch and wins the heart of the old man’s beautiful daughter.

    • #1
  2. Steve Fast Coolidge
    Steve Fast
    @SteveFast

    FredGoodhue (View Comment):

    A while back I bought a DVD of early John Wayne movies. They were all westerns with the same plot. John Wayne is a loner who comes into the valley and meets the old man who has a small ranch threatened by the richest man in the valley (all 1930s screenwriters were communists, so the villain is always wealthy). John Wayne saves the ranch and wins the heart of the old man’s beautiful daughter.

    I did the same thing – maybe it was even the same DVD. I had seen a John Wayne movie I really enjoyed and thought it would be fun to see some of his old movies. They were awful movies with the same cookie-cutter plot. Hollywood churned out a lot of dreck in the 1920s and 1930s, along with some of the greatest movies of all time.

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