Nick Cannon, the creator of the popular Wild ‘N Out, was fired by Viacom for saying racist and anti-Semitic statements on a podcast on June 30th. Bethany Mandel, the editor of Ricochet, joins Shermichael and Antonia to breakdown the long-standing tension between some in the black and Jewish communities.

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  1. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    I think Antonia had the most important line. We are all sinners and racism, judging others will never be eradicated. We can all work harder but ideals can become ideology and the next thing you know you have the French Revolution. I was interested in Bethany and Antonio’s thoughts about how to help young people think differently about blacks and slavery. I have bi-racial grandchildren so will have to look for ways to help them not just see history or black people as only about the period when they were enslaved. Also appreciated that history is nuanced. That is big problem that I have with the current ‘history’ being put forward. It’s all ‘black and white’ (you should pardon the expression). Thanks for the discussion. 

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  2. Antonia Okafor Podcaster
    Antonia Okafor
    @antonia

    colleenb (View Comment):

    I think Antonia had the most important line. We are all sinners and racism, judging others will never be eradicated. We can all work harder but ideals can become ideology and the next thing you know you have the French Revolution. I was interested in Bethany and Antonio’s thoughts about how to help young people think differently about blacks and slavery. I have bi-racial grandchildren so will have to look for ways to help them not just see history or black people as only about the period when they were enslaved. Also appreciated that history is nuanced. That is big problem that I have with the current ‘history’ being put forward. It’s all ‘black and white’ (you should pardon the expression). Thanks for the discussion.

    Thank you for listening! Let us know if there are other topics you would like us to go into for future episodes. We appreciate you very much.

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  3. Lois Lane Coolidge
    Lois Lane
    @LoisLane

    While I thought it was a worthwhile podcast, I will admit I found the conversation a little baffling.  Like Colleen, I do think Antonia was correct when falling into the Christian understanding of sin.  However, Bethany sounded to me like a person who had just read White Fragility.   

    Bethany.  If you are looking at figures pre-1865, you’re gonna find most black Americans entangled with slavery because this is part of US History.  Unfortunately, most black Americans who traveled to the US did so because of the slave trade, though it is inaccurate to say all.  (There were free blacks living/trading in New Amsterdam in the 1600s.)

    Does that entanglement with slavery mean a complete lack of agency for some incredible human beings?  No.  The story of the Jews is often one of oppression.  Isn’t it the fact that Jews overcame that is important?   How do you present Jewish history to your children???  

    The absolute refusal to accept being a slave is why Harriet Tubman is lifted up so often, but if you want to look at a free black man who played a part in that story, go to William Still. 

    If you want to find other black Americans who made a mark on history during a period in which systemic racism was a very real thing, a fact which can’t–and shouldn’t–be avoided, you could go much earlier as well. 

    Find out about people like Primus Hall who fought with George Washington in the American Revolution.  His father, Prince Hall, organized free blacks into a Masonic Order.  Phillis Wheatley was a slave but an important writer.   Benjamin Banneker made his mark on STEM.  Look at Mary Ellen Pleasant (bi-racial) who made a killing in San Francisco though people called her “Mammy Pleasant.”  Focus on Robert Smalls who used a Confederate boat to rescue his whole family and served as a politician during Reconstruction.  See Madam C J Walker who was an early black millionaire whose rags to riches story is so very American.  Get to the 20th century, and the Harlem Renaissance is rich with figures to study.  Zora Neale Hurston is awesome.  There are always soldiers!  In the 21st century????  I hated his politics, but I loved that President Obama could show kids that there is no glass ceiling that can’t be broken.  Buy the Obama paper dolls they sell in stores along with those of other first families, and that basic act shows equality without trying to force the issue.  

    Anyway, my father introduced me to black characters through fiction.  Lydia Bailey was written in the 1940s, and black people are not victims in this story.   I was given this novel to teach me about Toussaint Louverture whom my dad admired as one of the world’s greatest military leaders, whatever his race.   He wasn’t an American, but he was amazing.  

    Btw, I’d suppose the “black experience” is no more monolithic than the “white experience.”  Right?????

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  4. JosePluma Thatcher
    JosePluma
    @JosePluma

    @bethanymandel, doesn’t it seem odd to you that no entrepreneur has not made adhesive bandages in dark colors to match the skin tones of African Americans and other POC?  They’d make a killing! 

    Well, no.  Band Aids are a light color for reasons other than racism.  Just as all other dressings are white, they need to be that tone in order for it to be obvious when they are bloody or soiled.  A bandage that’s about the same color as dried blood is counterproductive.

    • #4
  5. Antonia Okafor Podcaster
    Antonia Okafor
    @antonia

    JosePluma (View Comment):

    @bethanymandel, doesn’t it seem odd to you that no entrepreneur has not made adhesive bandages in dark colors to match the skin tones of African Americans and other POC? They’d make a killing!

    Well, no. Band Aids are a light color for reasons other than racism. Just as all other dressings are white, they need to be that tone in order for it to be obvious when they are bloody or soiled. A bandage that’s about the same color as dried blood is counterproductive.

    Jose, I assure you that the color of band-aids has nothing to do with the closeness of dried blood. In fact, because capitalism is so great, there have been companies that have filled the void and made band-aid colors in a wide array of colors that fit a lot more skin tones than just the original peachy “flesh” tone. Check out brownadges.com for a great one! 

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