Ayaan speaks with Winston Marshall soon after he left the band, Mumford & Sons. They discuss his work helping Hong Kongers integrate into the UK, his interest in speaking up for the Uighurs in China, and much more.

This episode was recorded on June 28th, 2021.

Winston Marshall was the banjo player in the popular rock band, Mumford & Sons, from 2007-2021. In March, Winston tweeted “Congratulations Andy Ngo. Finally had the time to read your important book. You’re a brave man.”

Facing strong backlash from the Left for his tweet, he apologized to protect his band members. In June, he wrote an article on Medium where he explained the difficult decision to leave Mumford & Sons.

Winston is the co-founder of Hong Kong Link Up, a non-profit organization which aims to link up British residents with Hong Kongers arriving in the UK.

Follow him on Twitter @mrwinmarshall.

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There are 3 comments.

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  1. GlennAmurgis Coolidge
    GlennAmurgis
    @GlennAmurgis

    Another interesting interview 

    • #1
  2. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    Interestingly, Hirsi Ali now says she identifies repression as coming primarily from the Left, not the Right.

    She used to believe the occasional political success of the Right made up for the Left’s cultural dominance, but now disagrees.

    But Winston Marshall was reluctant to go along with this.

    • #2
  3. OwnedByDogs Coolidge
    OwnedByDogs
    @JuliaBlaschke

    Taras (View Comment):

    Interestingly, Hirsi Ali now says she identifies repression as coming primarily from the Left, not the Right.

    She used to believe the occasional political success of the Right made up for the Left’s cultural dominance, but now disagrees.

    But Winston Marshall was reluctant to go along with this.

    She educated him so charmingly ;)

    • #3