China cheats on trade, Iran cheats on nukes, Trump cheated his way into office…or so the allegations go. And of course, there’s baseball’s cheating scandal. Richard Epstein, the Hoover Institution’s Peter and Kirsten Bedford Senior Fellow and the voice behind The Libertarian and Law Talk podcasts, weighs in on the balance of virtue and rules-flaunting in modern society.

 

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  1. Leslie Watkins Inactive
    Leslie Watkins Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Great fun! Great guy(s)!

    • #1
    • January 24, 2020, at 6:26 PM PST
    • 1 like
  2. Taras Coolidge

    Fascinating stuff! I can just imagine that class full of super-bright little Jewish kids that little Dickie Epstein was part of. (But those bright kids moved on long ago, and that school is probably a slum today.)

    Most people follow politics only vaguely. As a result, the popularity of Bill Clinton around the time of his impeachment does not reflect public acceptance of all the Clinton scandals.

    Indeed, there were so many Clinton scandals, they were impossible to keep track of, even for people who do follow politics. I often thought at the time, and since, that we needed an Encyclopedia of Clinton Scandals.

    I expected that, as a self-styled libertarian, Prof. Epstein would mention the problem of free trade with slave states, as one of his exceptions to free trade. But that was not one of his two exceptions.

    When you trade with a slave state, in effect you’re trading in stolen property. Which Prof. Epstein would object to. I think.

    • #2
    • January 29, 2020, at 7:53 AM PST
    • Like
  3. MISTER BITCOIN Member

    Taras (View Comment):

    Fascinating stuff! I can just imagine that class full of super-bright little Jewish kids that little Dickie Epstein was part of. (But those bright kids moved on long ago, and that school is probably a slum today.)

    Most people follow politics only vaguely. As a result, the popularity of Bill Clinton around the time of his impeachment does not reflect public acceptance of all the Clinton scandals.

    Indeed, there were so many Clinton scandals, they were impossible to keep track of, even for people who do follow politics. I often thought at the time, and since, that we needed an Encyclopedia of Clinton Scandals.

    I expected that, as a self-styled libertarian, Prof. Epstein would mention the problem of free trade with slave states, as one of his exceptions to free trade. But that was not one of his two exceptions.

    When you trade with a slave state, in effect you’re trading in stolen property. Which Prof. Epstein would object to. I think.

    in your slave state example, what property is stolen?

     

    • #3
    • February 4, 2020, at 12:29 AM PST
    • Like
  4. Taras Coolidge

    MISTER BITCOIN (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    Fascinating stuff! I can just imagine that class full of super-bright little Jewish kids that little Dickie Epstein was part of. (But those bright kids moved on long ago, and that school is probably a slum today.)

    Most people follow politics only vaguely. As a result, the popularity of Bill Clinton around the time of his impeachment does not reflect public acceptance of all the Clinton scandals.

    Indeed, there were so many Clinton scandals, they were impossible to keep track of, even for people who do follow politics. I often thought at the time, and since, that we needed an Encyclopedia of Clinton Scandals.

    I expected that, as a self-styled libertarian, Prof. Epstein would mention the problem of free trade with slave states, as one of his exceptions to free trade. But that was not one of his two exceptions.

    When you trade with a slave state, in effect you’re trading in stolen property. Which Prof. Epstein would object to. I think.

    in your slave state example, what property is stolen?

     

    Whatever the slaves are producing — and not getting paid for.

    Capitalist: produce this and I will pay you money.

    Slaver: produce this and I will refrain from flogging you to death.

    • #4
    • February 4, 2020, at 8:28 AM PST
    • Like
  5. MISTER BITCOIN Member

    Taras (View Comment):

    MISTER BITCOIN (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    Fascinating stuff! I can just imagine that class full of super-bright little Jewish kids that little Dickie Epstein was part of. (But those bright kids moved on long ago, and that school is probably a slum today.)

    Most people follow politics only vaguely. As a result, the popularity of Bill Clinton around the time of his impeachment does not reflect public acceptance of all the Clinton scandals.

    Indeed, there were so many Clinton scandals, they were impossible to keep track of, even for people who do follow politics. I often thought at the time, and since, that we needed an Encyclopedia of Clinton Scandals.

    I expected that, as a self-styled libertarian, Prof. Epstein would mention the problem of free trade with slave states, as one of his exceptions to free trade. But that was not one of his two exceptions.

    When you trade with a slave state, in effect you’re trading in stolen property. Which Prof. Epstein would object to. I think.

    in your slave state example, what property is stolen?

     

    Whatever the slaves are producing — and not getting paid for.

    Capitalist: produce this and I will pay you money.

    Slaver: produce this and I will refrain from flogging you to death.

    what percent of the old confederate population owned slaves in 1863?

    how many owned large plantations?

    i forget the exact number but i know it was low, much lower than i assumed

     

    • #5
    • February 4, 2020, at 5:02 PM PST
    • Like