Ankler Editor Richard Rushfield and co-host Emily Yoshida talk about the tragedy or non-tragedy of the coming-of-age movie Booksmart. Corners of social media are in shock that the indie comedy fell behind the Disney spectacle Aladdin. Is there injustice at work or did the hidden hand of Twitter secretly sabotage its own cause celebre? And then we chat about Hollywood’s growing Georgia boycott. Is Hollywood taking a big stand here or looking for a moment to grandstand?

Intro Music: Train Wreck by Kasey Chambers

Outro music: Georgia on My Mind by Hoagy Carmichael

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There are 8 comments.

  1. Texmoor Coolidge

    A very woke guest vs un-woke host episode.

    • #1
    • May 30, 2019, at 10:06 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  2. filmklassik Member

    Strange podcast. Richard and Emily seemed genuinely befuddled by the public’s indifference to BOOKSMART … and that may say more about them than the film itself. Richard and Emily — incredibly — failed to notice (or at least to comment on) the inherent disconnect between the world portrayed in this movie, and the world we actually inhabit.

    BOOKSMART takes place in a high school where 99.99% of the students are nice, supportive and accepting of one another.

    And what high school is that, I wonder? None that I attended, surely. And none that any of my friends attended. And none that I have ever heard of, or even read about.

    The movie, in short, takes place in Woketown, USA. It looks and sounds as though it was written in code by the WokeMaster 8000.

    And this intrinsic, self-congratulatory wokeness — which comes off the movie like a musk — can be extremely alienating to people who haven’t fully guzzled the PC Kool Aid, not to mention those whose high school experiences don’t remotely comport with the one portrayed in this movie. (And the best high school movies — yes, even the comedies — tend to offer, at least to some degree, the frisson of recognition).

    Richard and Emily failed to comment on this. But I suppose when you’re able to use phrases like “No need to body-shame Godzilla” without a hint of irony, it means you are incredibly woke yourself, and are not going to smell the “woke” musk.

    Or, to break out another metaphor: Fish don’t know they’re wet.

    Emily, in particular, strikes me as someone who believes that a failure to be “woke” means that one is — whether consciously or not — racist, misogynistic, homophobic and, just in general, bigoted.

    And what’s truly frightening is, she speaks for a huge percentage — indeed, for the vast majority — of critics and the “chattering class.” God help us all.

    But that’s where we are now.

    • #2
    • May 30, 2019, at 10:32 AM PST
    • 1 like
  3. filmklassik Member

    Texmoor (View Comment):

    A very woke guest vs un-woke host episode.

    I disagree that Richard is “very” un-woke. He’s not. If he was, he’d have realized at once how off-the-chart “woke” BOOKSMART is, and understood at once that this wokeness is likely a major contributor to its failure to connect with audiences.

    But he never said this.

    Instead, he kept talking about the movie’s marketing; about the inadvisability of opening it on so many screens, etc.

    He reminded me of the guy whose 700 pound sister — a bearded lady at the circus — keeps striking out on Match.com (“What’s wrong with me?!”) and the advice he keeps offering is, “You need to wear a different color blouse in your profile picture, and don’t forget to mention you love Springsteen!”

    Not a word about, y’know, the 700 pounds or the beard.

    This particular episode was truly bizarre for that reason. It was borderline surreal, actually.

    • #3
    • May 30, 2019, at 10:49 AM PST
    • 1 like
  4. EtCarter Listener

    I am glad Ankler on the Air exist. I think many people agree.

    Btw, Ricochet friends, I’ve decided there’s a whole lotta content on the DC Universe streaming network worth paying for each month than there is on Netflix.

    P.S.

    I don’t “boycott” media companies on general principles, however, that does not mean my economic savvy has been suspended (and all those Animated DC shows are worth the price of admittance alone…that tip is pure gratis)

    • #4
    • May 30, 2019, at 10:51 AM PST
    • Like
  5. Archibald Campbell Member

    I haven’t listened yet, but do they consider that Booksmart might be a bad film?

    • #5
    • May 30, 2019, at 11:37 AM PST
    • Like
  6. Texmoor Coolidge

    filmklassik (View Comment):

    Strange podcast. Richard and Emily seemed genuinely befuddled by the public’s indifference to BOOKSMART … and that may say more about them than the film itself. Richard and Emily — incredibly — failed to notice (or at least to comment on) the inherent disconnect between the world portrayed in this movie, and the world we actually inhabit.

    BOOKSMART takes place in a high school where 99.99% of the students are nice, supportive and accepting of one another.

    And what high school is that, I wonder? None that I attended, surely. And none that any of my friends attended. And none that I have ever heard of, or even read about.

    The movie, in short, takes place in Woketown, USA. It looks and sounds as though it was written in code by the WokeMaster 8000.

    And this intrinsic, self-congratulatory wokeness — which comes off the movie like a musk — can be extremely alienating to people who haven’t fully guzzled the PC Kool Aid, not to mention those whose high school experiences don’t remotely comport with the one portrayed in this movie. (And the best high school movies — yes, even the comedies — tend to offer, at least to some degree, the frisson of recognition).

    Richard and Emily failed to comment on this. But I suppose when you’re able to use phrases like “No need to body-shame Godzilla” without a hint of irony, it means you are incredibly woke yourself, and are not going to smell the “woke” musk.

    Or, to break out another metaphor: Fish don’t know they’re wet.

    Emily, in particular, strikes me as someone who believes that a failure to be “woke” means that one is — whether consciously or not — racist, misogynistic, homophobic and, just in general, bigoted.

    And what’s truly frightening is, she speaks for a huge percentage — indeed, for the vast majority — of critics and the “chattering class.” God help us all.

    But that’s where we are now.

    Sonny has a good breakdown of Booksmart on the latest Substandard.

    • #6
    • May 30, 2019, at 11:46 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  7. filmklassik Member

    Texmoor (View Comment):

    filmklassik (View Comment):

    Strange podcast. Richard and Emily seemed genuinely befuddled by the public’s indifference to BOOKSMART … and that may say more about them than the film itself. Richard and Emily — incredibly — failed to notice (or at least to comment on) the inherent disconnect between the world portrayed in this movie, and the world we actually inhabit.

    BOOKSMART takes place in a high school where 99.99% of the students are nice, supportive and accepting of one another.

    And what high school is that, I wonder? None that I attended, surely. And none that any of my friends attended. And none that I have ever heard of, or even read about.

    The movie, in short, takes place in Woketown, USA. It looks and sounds as though it was written in code by the WokeMaster 8000.

    And this intrinsic, self-congratulatory wokeness — which comes off the movie like a musk — can be extremely alienating to people who haven’t fully guzzled the PC Kool Aid, not to mention those whose high school experiences don’t remotely comport with the one portrayed in this movie. (And the best high school movies — yes, even the comedies — tend to offer, at least to some degree, the frisson of recognition).

    Richard and Emily failed to comment on this. But I suppose when you’re able to use phrases like “No need to body-shame Godzilla” without a hint of irony, it means you are incredibly woke yourself, and are not going to smell the “woke” musk.

    Or, to break out another metaphor: Fish don’t know they’re wet.

    Emily, in particular, strikes me as someone who believes that a failure to be “woke” means that one is — whether consciously or not — racist, misogynistic, homophobic and, just in general, bigoted.

    And what’s truly frightening is, she speaks for a huge percentage — indeed, for the vast majority — of critics and the “chattering class.” God help us all.

    But that’s where we are now.

    Sonny has a good breakdown of Booksmart on the latest Substandard.

    I’ll give it a listen, but I’ve found that acceptance of all things “woke” is largely generational, and the guys on the Substandard are young.

    Young people — even many that are nominally right of center — often do not see “woke” patterns.

    And when you fail to notice cultural patterns, it generally means you are okay with those patterns.

    In other words, 9 times out of 10? Failure to notice “wokeness” = Being cool with “wokeness.”

    Strange times.

    Sad times, too.

     

    • #7
    • May 30, 2019, at 12:15 PM PST
    • Like
  8. Kep Inactive
    Kep

    Love the podcast.

    • #8
    • May 30, 2019, at 4:47 PM PST
    • Like