The Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation recently released their annual poll for the year 2019, revealing that over one third of the millennial generation view communism favorably, 15% believing that the world would be “better off ” if the Soviet Union still existed. History, however, tells a different story. Joining this episode is Valentina Kuryliw, the daughter of survivors of a forgotten genocide orchestrated by the Soviet Union in Ukraine, called the Holodomor. Valentina shares the story of the Holodomor, explains how the Soviet Union covered up the evidence, and uncovers the reality of communism.

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There are 5 comments.

  1. Laptop Member

    Thank you for this episode. I had also only heard of the Holodomor a few years ago, and was shocked not to have heard of it before. Like the Holocaust, it is another episode in history that should be widely known and never forgotten.

    I wish the author success in educating more people.

    • #1
    • November 28, 2019, at 1:54 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  2. Taras Coolidge

    Excellent, brief (28:30) account of Stalin’s 1932-33 “artificial famine”, as it is sometimes called, that killed at least 4 million — and taught Adolf Hitler it’s possible to murder millions of people, and cover it up.

    That FDR chose to recognize the Soviet Union before the bodies were even buried is instructive.

    But then, didn’t the New York Times announce there was no famine? Their Pulitzer Prize-winning correspondent in Moscow told them so.

    • #2
    • November 29, 2019, at 6:40 AM PST
    • 5 likes
  3. Architectus Member

    Excellent interview on an important topic. I first learned of the event long ago (late 80’s?) after meeting Robert Conquest and reading his book Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-famine. This was one of the earliest attempts to document the facts of the genocide as history. Unbelievable that it was so unknown, and is still relatively hidden in history. I was struck right away by the line he wrote in the preface, which puts the entire book in perspective as you read page after page: 

    “The task of the historian is the notoriously difficult one of trying to represent clearly and truly in a few hundred pages events which cover years of time and nations of men and women. We may perhaps put this in perspective in the present case by saying that in the actions here recorded about 20 human lives were lost for, not every word, but every letter, in this book.”

    Now keep this in mind for nearly 350 pages, and try not to be moved.

    • #3
    • December 1, 2019, at 4:33 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  4. colleenb Member

    Architectus (View Comment):

    Excellent interview on an important topic. I first learned of the event long ago (late 80’s?) after meeting Robert Conquest and reading his book Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-famine. This was one of the earliest attempts to document the facts of the genocide as history. Unbelievable that it was so unknown, and is still relatively hidden in history. I was struck right away by the line he wrote in the preface, which puts the entire book in perspective as you read page after page:

    “The task of the historian is the notoriously difficult one of trying to represent clearly and truly in a few hundred pages events which cover years of time and nations of men and women. We may perhaps put this in perspective in the present case by saying that in the actions here recorded about 20 human lives were lost for, not every word, but every letter, in this book.”

    Now keep this in mind for nearly 350 pages, and try not to be moved.

    I have not read the Conquest book but do recommend Ann Applebaum’s Red Famine. 

    • #4
    • December 3, 2019, at 8:00 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  5. colleenb Member

    Architectus (View Comment):

    Excellent interview on an important topic. I first learned of the event long ago (late 80’s?) after meeting Robert Conquest and reading his book Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-famine. This was one of the earliest attempts to document the facts of the genocide as history. Unbelievable that it was so unknown, and is still relatively hidden in history. I was struck right away by the line he wrote in the preface, which puts the entire book in perspective as you read page after page:

    “The task of the historian is the notoriously difficult one of trying to represent clearly and truly in a few hundred pages events which cover years of time and nations of men and women. We may perhaps put this in perspective in the present case by saying that in the actions here recorded about 20 human lives were lost for, not every word, but every letter, in this book.”

    Now keep this in mind for nearly 350 pages, and try not to be moved.

    I have not read the Conquest book but do recommend Ann Applebaum’s Red Famine. Agree that this is an excellent interview on an important topic.

    • #5
    • December 3, 2019, at 8:42 AM PST
    • 1 like