Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Bringing a Sword to a Sword Fight

 

A couple of years ago, our neighborhood pub decided to hold a mug-raising contest for Octoberfest. My wife got goaded by her friends and entered at the last minute. The 20 or so contestants held full beer mugs at arm’s length; after about five minutes, people began to drop out rapidly. As the clock ticked down toward ten minutes, there were only three contestants left: Two young, fit guys and a woman in her fifties. Finally, one of the guys gave up and lowered his mug. The other fellow, thinking that he had won, held out his glass for a few more seconds. He triumphantly lowered his arm, then looked behind him and saw my wife still holding up her mug.

My favorite Ricochet podcast is the Andrew Klavan Show. I like his commentary and I also enjoy his books. On January 6, he talked about a TV show called The Witcher. (From here; go to about minute 39 for the quote.)

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Conservative Media Shakeout and Misguided Price Points

 

I generally read and follow most right-of-center media endeavors, except for those that consistently offer very little (e.g., Heritage Signal, etc.). I have long had a high regard for Jonah Goldberg, usually appreciating his former stance of self-deprecating good humor; I have all of his books, some even autographed. I would have voted for David French for president had he run.

But I do not see the purpose of The Dispatch, Jonah’s new venture with Steve Hayes (former Weekly Standard editor; his book on The Connection is criminally neglected by all of the isolationists out there), and a few others (including David French lured away from National Review). I am not speaking here only as one who believes that the Green Bay Packers are Evil (they are, and Aaron Rodgers is one of the biggest jerks in professional sports; if you know Steve Hayes, you understand why it was necessary for me to point that out about Rodgers and the Packers).

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. What If Trump Turns Out to Be a Great President?

 

Frankly, I had assumed the outcome would be otherwise. I don’t think my reaction to the 2016 election result was atypical among conservatives. I was delighted to dodge the bullet to the heart of the nation’s well-being that was Hillary Clinton. But I assumed Donald Trump would have no coherent agenda other than to try not to be Obama or Hillary and that he would likely step aside in 2020 after an ineffectual if not entertaining four years. Trump did not appear to have much of a policy compass or vision.

It never occurred to me that Trump could be highly successful or even a great president. His demeanor suggested that greatness was not to be his destiny. He often seems to share the same tendencies toward venality and petty vengefulness that characterized the Johnson and Nixon presidencies but with far less skill (and regard) for inside-baseball politics than those two. I assumed the bureaucracy would eventually tie Trump down as they always do with outsiders and perceived enemies and that they would stalemate any serious attempt at policy change.

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According to Robert F. Kennedy Jr, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) which approves new vaccines, allows employees to receive up to $150,000 from vaccine manufacturers. The manufacturers are exempt from safety testing and are not held liable for injury claims. Yet while most people born before the late ’90s were required to take 3-4 vaccines as a child, nowadays kids must take over 70(!), many not tested. Pharmaceutical companies are generating over $50 Billion a year providing medicine just to handle the side effects. The government is spending billions to settle cases instead of vaccine manufacturers. What is going on here??? Robert discusses why he’s NOT an anti-Vaxxer, labeled by the media and some in his own family. @23:30 We discuss RFK working with President Trump on vaccines and autism. – @36:35 Robert’s view about today’s Democrat party and the difference between today’s Left and his Uncle and Father. Learn much more at https://childrenshealthdefense.org/.

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In a Law Talk first, Professors Richard Epstein & John Yoo and host Troy Senik are gathered in the same studio to kick off their tenth year of the podcast. On this episode: Can Congress rein in President Trump’s power to pursue military action against Iran? What was Nancy Pelosi trying to accomplish by withholding the articles of impeachment? Can the Justice Department compel Apple to create a backdoor on encrypted devices? And is Utah’s effort to rescind a personalized license plate a potential First Amendment violation? All that and more as the faculty lounge reopens for 2020.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. We Are the Resistance!

 

Have you noticed lately the number of journalists who are regularly using the term “the Resistance” when they refer to the members of the Left? Do you realize how they have subtly been indoctrinated to use the term resistance and they are unintentionally legitimizing the work of the Left? The word resistance has been co-opted by the Left, and it’s time that we not only hold them to account, but we should consider embracing the term for the political Right.

Resistance movements describe groups that formed to resist armies that were invading and destroying legitimate countries:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Very Personal Civil War: The Divorce of Chaplain McCulloh

 

The American Civil War is known by many names, but one of the more common and poignant ones is “The Brother’s War,” as the conflict often split families and caused sibling to fight against sibling. Familial conflict over the war did not confine itself only to brothers; it sometimes tore apart couples and separated husband from wife.

In the fall of 1863 Reverend William D. McCulloh [also spelled in some records as McCullough] wrote out a petition to the Mississippi legislature asking them to dissolve the bonds of matrimony that existed between himself and his wife Harriet. It was probably with a heavy heart that McCulloh penned the following letter:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Missing the Point on Warren vs. Sanders

 

Elizabeth Warren claims Bernie Sanders said that a woman can’t beat Trump in 2020. Sanders denies having said it. Everywhere I look, I come across some pundit treating this as if it’s a real scandal: Is Sanders a women-hater? Or is Warren lying through her teeth (again)?

What I haven’t come across is a sane person pointing out that even if Sanders said exactly what Warren claims, it’s not evidence of woman-hating. It’s simply an opinion or prediction about what the outcome would be. (Or, perhaps, a bit of gamesmanship gamespersonship.)

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Musings on Turning 50

 

“A man who views the world the same at fifty as he did at twenty has wasted thirty years of his life.” — Muhammad Ali

I turn 50 today. Humans make meaning out of randomness, and since we use base-10 math, birthdays ending in zero can be a big deal. I find that 50 is an opportunity for reflection on my life. I always had goals for age 50, some spoken and some just understood. Part of the wonder I have is how I have changed in ways that Bryan of 30 years ago cannot even imagine.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Possibly Politically Motivated Probe

 

In a shocking story with shocking allegations which should shock absolutely nobody:

The Justice Department is investigating whether then-FBI Director James Comey illegally leaked secret information concerning a Russian document to The New York Times and The Washington Post, the Times reported late Thursday.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The People Rally Around WA Citizens Stranded in Snowstorm…

 

…while the State and County governments do not. For the past few days, US Highway 2 over Stevens Pass has been closed due to a severe snowstorm that dumped feet of snow in a very short time. Trees were falling over the road, taking power lines with them, cutting off the towns of Baring, Skykomish, and Grotto. This is what Highway 2 looked like Tuesday.

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The Senate impeachment trial of President Trump begins in earnest Tuesday. Nobody knows the charges better than Republican Rep. Jim Jordan, who was there for every step of impeachment’s way in the House. The articles of impeachment are actually quite brief, and we go line-by-line through the accusations against the president. Jordan answers them all — he appears to be able to recite key documents by heart — and argues that the Senate should simply dismiss the case before the trial even begins. A preview from a key player in the House.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Important, Timely (nod to Speaker Pelosi) Questions

 

It’s “time,” as Speaker Pelosi might prayerfully suggest, to get answers to these perplexing questions.

On Joe Biden and the impeachment:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. How Is Desire Healed?

 

Yes, desire needs to be healed. Or, at least, that’s what people like Augustine of Hippo thought. (Here is the background conversation about that.)

So, how is desire healed? Here are a few pointers on eight neat books where Augustine discusses it. I go into more detail in my new book, Reason, Authority, and the Healing of Desire in the Writings of Augustine. These eight books make a great cross-section of Augustine’s writings:

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Amity Shlaes is the author of Great Society: A New History, a sweeping revision of our last great period of governmental idealism, the 1960s. She is the presidential scholar at The Kings College in New York, chairs the board of trustees of the Calvin Coolidge Presidential Foundation, and previously wrote bestsellers The Forgotten Man and Coolidge. (You really need to read them all!)

The intro/outro song of the week is “Amity” by Elliot Smith. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist!

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Delingpod: Crazy Like a Fox

 
Laurence Fox on this week’s “Question Time.” (BBC)

Laurence Fox is my new favourite actor – and after you’ve listened to our podcast chat he’ll be yours too.

A scion of the great Fox dynasty (Dad James starred opposite Mick Jagger in Performance; Uncle Edward was in Day of the Jackal; cousins Emilia and Freddie continue the tradition), Laurence is himself a fine actor (most recently he played Lord Palmerston in Victoria; he was also DS Hathaway for nine seasons of Lewis). But where he really stands out is as an outspoken crusader against politically correct culture: he doesn’t buy ‘white privilege’; he doesn’t believe all white people are racists; he thinks #MeToo is overdone; he doesn’t believe in quota casting. For some of us, these maybe normal sensible views. Coming from an actor, though, they are brave indeed.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Impeachment Idiocy

 

We are now formally into exactly the type of sham that the Framers argued against at the Constitutional Convention. One has only to read the clearest record of that discussion (Madison’s Notes) with even the most elementary understanding to know the whole process was to prevent this type of partisan action by the House.

The Articles of Impeachment were finally released from their hostage status in the House by yet another embarrassing Pelosi moment as she announced the seven House managers for this latest installment of a three-plus-year drama. Flanked by Chairmen Nadler and Schiff, she rambled about “time” long and confusingly enough that even Jerry Nadler briefly moved out of his trance-like gaze into nothing for a second or two to foster speculation that perhaps his months-long coma had ended. Adam Schiff also let those weasel eyes drift toward the heavens a few times as if to be asking for an end to the Speaker’s speaking – or perhaps a clue as to what the hell she was saying.

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Now that impeachment is upon us we thought we’d let the guys do a long segment (that’s not a euphemism) on it themselves. Then, Niall Ferguson joins to explain why the Trump administration is like the Corleone family, but trust us — he means this as a compliment (calm down and read the column, MAGA folks). We go celestial with this week’s Lileks Post of The Week Winning the Cosmic Lottery by @brycecarmony. Are we alone? Give us your take in the comments. And finally, the Attorney General wants Apple to create a back door to our phones. Since we always forget to lock the back door, we tend to think this is a bad idea. How about you?

Music from this week’s show: You Ain’t The Problem by Michael Kiwanuka

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Senate Should Vote to Dismiss the Two Impeachment Counts

 

The Constitution states: “The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.”

The house charged Trump with:

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You asked, we’re answering: Elisha Krauss and Lyndsey Fifield have tried every deep conditioning mask, vitamin supplement, and heatless-curl Youtube tutorial known to womankind. After some recent trauma to their tresses they’re sharing their top tips for keeping your mane healthy (at any length) and happy (but seriously why is hair so emotional?) no matter what your mama gave you.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Uncommon Knowledge: The Impeachment Handbook With John Yoo & Richard Epstein

 

 

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“There’s a lot of hostility to religious beliefs,” says Joe Grogan, director of the Domestic Policy Council at the White House.

“These views are protected by the First Amendment and people who are offended by public expressions of faith need to get over it,” he adds.

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On the Friday interview edition of the Daily Daily Caller Podcast we sat down with Brandon Straka, who created a sensation with a viral video about why he was leaving the Democratic Party and encouraged others to “#WalkAway” from the radical left.

How does a Hillary Clinton-voting liberal gay man working as a hairdresser in Nebraska start a viral movement encouraging people across the country to leave the Democratic Party? Brandon Straka knows because he lived it. He started the #WalkAway movement, which has grow into a major force in politics.

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This week on the mighty GLoP podcast, the guys spend some time analyzing Megxit, the economics, the relationships, and the causes. Then, it’s time we got serious (well, serious for this show) about the prospect of President Sanders. Sure, he could win — stranger things have happened (cough). Also, we take another look at Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, and finish up with some birthday wishes for The Podfather himself, the great Norman Podhoretz, who turned 90 years young on January 16th. Happy birthday, sir!

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Great Ads

 

Two of my favorite advertisements. In light of the procession to the Senate with the Articles of Impeachment, never have so few done so little for so many, I thought I would throw a change-up. If impeachment is leaving you with a bad taste in your mouth, or if you feel the whole thing is like herding cats, enjoy. Come to think of it, as Dennis Miller said, Nancy Pelosi when asked a tough question has the same expression on her face as a raccoon peering over the edge of a garbage can in the middle of the night.

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