Greg Corombos of Radio America and Jim Geraghty of National Review applaud Hawaii Democratic Rep. Tulsi Gabbard for being a fearless voice against her own party on the issue of national security. They also rip United Health for just now realizing that Obamacare is a disaster for their bottom line. And they groan as Hillary uses little girls in an ad to pitch the need for a female president.

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Greg Corombos of Radio America and Jim Geraghty of National Review cheer Oklahoma Wesleyan University President Everett Piper for telling students to grow up and quit complaining every time they get their feelings hurt. They also groan as Russia and Turkey crank up the tensions instead of focusing on the actual enemy. And they point out the hypocrisy of world leaders dining at a posh French restaurant after telling the world we need to share the sacrifice in fighting climate change.

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History professor Burt Folsom became friends with Mitch Rutledge, a convicted murderer on death row in Alabama — and he tells about it in a book he has co-authored with his wife Anita, Death on Hold: A Prisoner’s Desperate Prayer and the Unlikely Family who Became God’s Answer.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Folsom describes what compelled him to get in touch with Rutledge, why prison rehabilitation is so hard, and why a guy who has written best-selling books on FDR and the New Deal would take up this subject.

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Greg Corombos of Radio America and Jim Geraghty of National Review are glad to see some coverage returning to the issue of Hillary Clinton making decisions at the State Department that regularly favored huge donors to the Clinton Foundation. They also shake their heads at Pres. Obama after he suggests holding a summit on climate change is the best possible rebuke towards ISIS. And Jim unloads on liberal double standards over when political speech supposedly contributes to the motives of shooters and he also rails against the notion that we have to tone down the rhetoric in the hopes that crazy people might stop wanting to kill others.

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Greg Corombos of Radio America and Jim Geraghty of National Review celebrate Black Friday by each giving out three politically-themed gifts.

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The Ricochet Law School (diplomas available on Ebay) is back in session for another romp through the legal and constitutional issues of the day. This week, do governors actually have the power to turn away turn away Syrian immigrants? Then, a look at the controversy surrounding encryption and whether or not opening it up would in fact make the world safer. Finally, should computers have First Amendment rights? The Profs have an opinion. Let us know yours in the comments below.

Tell it to the judge, EJHill.

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Greg Corombos and Jim Geraghty of National Review prepare for Thanksgiving by discussing three political things they’re thankful for.

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img_0674Many “progressive” Democrats, including Hillary Clinton rival Bernie Sanders, argue America should model itself on Scandinavia and its egalitarian social democracies. As Sanders told ABC News, “I think we should look to countries like Denmark, like Sweden and Norway, and learn from what they have accomplished for their working people.”

But is IKEAmerica really possible or even desirable? To find out about whether the US should be Swedenizing — as well as the latest about that country’s immigration crisis — I chat with Tino Sanandaji, a Stockholm — based economist and author who received his graduate degree in Public Policy from the University of Chicago. Some listeners may be familiar with his work in National Review where he has written on immigration, education, and entrepreneurship.

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Oh, Chicago. Where did we go wrong? With our shocking fiscal crisis, looming and potentially crippling property tax hikes, rampant crime, out flight of businesses and youth, crumbling infrastructure, education system mired in corruption and under performance, rising cost-of-living…the list of ills goes on and on.

Oh, Chicago. Where did we go wrong? With our shocking fiscal crisis, looming and potentially crippling property tax hikes, rampant crime, out flight of businesses and youth, crumbling infrastructure, education system mired in corruption and under performance, rising cost-of-living…the list of ills goes on and on.

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In recognition of Thanksgiving, Jay has gathered four worthies to discuss America, and what to be grateful for, where America is concerned.

The worthies are Mona Charen, Scott Immergut (aka Blue Yeti), Kevin Williamson, and Charlie Cooke. Jay has approximately 20 categories: “Name three of your favorite American . . .” movies, foods, novels, comedians, states, accents, singers, athletes, presidents, sites, etc. It is a regular festival of Americanness. Celebrate along with them. And of course, please tell us your favorites in the comments below.

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Polls show Hillary Clinton losing head-to-head against several GOP candidates. Study shows 13 percent of Syrian refugees are ISIS sympathizers. The search continues for Salah Abdeslam and accomplices.

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When it comes to ancient Greece, Athens gets all the attention–but Sparta deserves most of the credit for the defeat of the Persians during the classical period, says author and Ricochet contributor Paul A. Rahe in his new book, The Grand Strategy of Classical Sparta: The Persian Challenge.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Rahe argues that the West owes much more to the Spartans than 300 (which is an excellent movie) and accuses many historians of overrating the importance of Athens. He explains why he calls the Persian invasion a “jihad” and whether the Spartans have any lessons to teach Americans in the 21st century.

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When you say Paris this week, one thinks of jihadi killers – but that’s not what President Obama thinks about. He’s looking forward to the great summit on climate change set to begin there next week. Jay and Mona welcome Steve Hayward, the right’s most astute analyst of the folks he has christened the “climatistas,” to fill us in on what to expect. Will it be a second Kyoto? More end runs around Congress perhaps? Steve explains what it means to be a “luke-warmer” on climate.

Next, the conversation moves to John Kerry and his staggeringly gross comments about the terrorists and murder (some are “understandable” apparently), an update on the collective nervous breakdown on American campuses, memories of Bill Buckley’s unsuccessful mayoral race in 1965, whether you should shake hands with a dictator, and what will happen if the Republican party actually nominates you know who.

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Last week’s podcast concluded just before the attacks in Paris began, so this week, we’ve assembled a couple of guests who can help us make sense of it all and divine what response the U.S. should make both the terrorists and the refugees soon to be arriving en masse.

Herb Meyer served during the Reagan Administration as Special Assistant to the Director of Central Intelligence and Vice Chairman of the CIA’s National Intelligence Council. He’s also the dad of Ricochet editor Tom Meyer. Walter Russell Mead is the Distinguished Scholar in American Strategy and Statesmanship at the Hudson Institute, the James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and Humanities at Bard College, and Editor-at-Large of The American Interest. He’s also someone’s dad. Finally, should tipping be discontinued? Tune in to find out.

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Greg Corombos of Radio America and Jim Geraghty of National Review sigh as FBI Director James Comey suggests the government can’t do anything else to vet Syrian refugees. They hammer Hillary Clinton for saying Muslims have nothing to do with terrorism. And they rip Hillary Clinton and her campaign for threatening legal action against the Laugh Factory in Los Angeles if it didn’t remove video of comedians mocking her when she visited the club last week.

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On this show we again investigate the events of another devastating attack on the French capital. We’re joined in studio by W. Rand Smith of Lake Forest College, a political scientist who studies French politics and Daniel S. Kamin, adjunct professor of International Relations at DePaul.

Via phone we check in with Fred Kagan of American Enterprise Institute and Fred Burton, VP of Intel at Stratfor.

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Greg Corombos of Radio America and Jim Geraghty of National Review like a new poll showing Hillary Clinton losing badly to all four top GOP candidates in Colorado. They also discuss multiple reports of Syrians fraudulently posing as refugees in an effort to reach the U.S. And they enjoy the demand of student protesters that Princeton scrub all references to former Pres. Woodrow Wilson.

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The world changed on All Saints Day in 1755, when a massive earthquake, tsunami, and firestorm struck at the heart of the Portuguese empire, reports Mark Molesky in This Gulf of Fire: The Destruction of Lisbon, or Apocalypse in the Age of Science and Reason.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Molesky explains how this cataclysm shaped scientific and intellectual history, launched the world’s first international relief effort, and revealed the enduring role of faith in European society. He also speculates on what would happen if similar earthquake were to take place near Europe today.

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When are we ever going to understand that Islamist terrorists really mean it? This is the theme of a special Paris edition of Radio Free Delingpole starring the go-to expert at dark times like these – Douglas Murray, Associate Director of the Henry Jackson Society. Douglas has been warning for years that attacks like the one on Paris were coming. How did he know? Because unlike so many politicians and commentators who find it more seductive to bury their heads in douglas-150-250-0the sand, Murray listens to what the Islamists are saying, studies what they do and finds little reason to believe that peace and love are about to break out soon if only we light a few more candles and get James Taylor to sing You Got A Friend again – maybe this time with the whole Laurel Canyon crowd. So: who’s to blame? Where do we go from here? Are Britain and the US next on the list? And is there any damn thing we can do about it? Douglas has all the answers…

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Greg Corombos of Radio America and Jim Geraghty of National Review applaud the French for rooting out terrorists in their country and for an aggressive bombing campaign in Syria. They also hammer Secretary of State John Kerry for saying the “rationale” for the ISIS attacks against Charlie Hebdo was easier to understand because it had published material offensive to Muslims. And Jim laments Bobby Jindal’s withdrawal from the 2016 campaign and rips Republicans who turned on Jindal for actually cutting spending.

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Ben Sasse was elected senator from Nebraska last year. He has just given his maiden floor speech: detailing what is wrong with the world’s “greatest deliberative body.” He and Jay talk about this.

Why is the Senate broken? What is the responsibility of the people themselves? What about entitlements? And the “administrative state”? And the new reality of employment? And cyberwar?

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This week, Larry Kudlow and Tim Pawlenty discuss the terrorist attack in Paris and the Obama administration’s tepid response. Also, Larry and Tim parse the tax plans of both the Democratic and Republican candidates. Spoiler alert: neither are up to snuff.

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What do Martin Luther, Albrecht Durer, and the Shroud of Turin have in common? They all play a part in the new comic novel by Christopher Buckley, The Relic Master.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, the author of Thank You for Smoking explains why he wanted to write a story about the market for holy relics in 16th-century Europe, which turns out to be almost as funny as 21st-century America.

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Greg Corombos of Radio America and Jim Geraghty of National Review applaud Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein for stating that ISIS is not contained, is growing significantly and needs to be destroyed. They also slam Pres. Obama for dismissing the ideas that American leadership and America winning are critical to defeating ISIS. And they react to new emails from Huma Abedin telling a colleague that Hillary Clinton is “often confused.”

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With the presidential election season in full swing, candidates in both parties are unveiling sweeping tax reform plans. But what’s smart public policy and what’s mere political posturing? To help find out, I chat with Stan Veuger of the American Enterprise Institute on this episode of Ricochet’s Political Economy podcast.

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