What happened to America’s elites? During the COVID-19 pandemic they have unleashed a torrent of authoritative pronouncements about the crisis that have too often proven to be incomplete or totally inaccurate. Victor Davis Hanson argues that the increasing specialization of intellectuals — along with a declining sense of humility — is making the expert class less and less reliable.

John Cochrane looks at the prospects that we’ll successfully reopen the economy without setting off another round of coronavirus outbreaks, explains what’s behind the models that got the virus’s trajectory so wrong, and explains how emergency economic measures could come back to haunt us in the future.

Victor Davis Hanson looks at the social, political, economic, and international hurdles the US will face as we attempt to bounce back from the coronavirus.

John Cochrane looks at how the coronavirus pandemic may alter American higher education, both in 2020 and beyond.

Richard Epstein examines a recent case about Detroit’s struggling schools in which the Sixth Circuit ruled that students have a ‘right’ to a certain minimal standard of education. Along the way he explains the dangers of courts getting too entangled in the provision of states service, the problem with ‘positive rights’ (and why their application is different at the the state level than the federal), and what more meaningful educational reform would look like.

Victor Davis Hanson responds to a media outcry over one of his recent columns, looks at Chinese culpability for the spread of COVID-19, and describes the factors that will be necessary for America to get back on its feet.

With Professors Epstein and Yoo deemed essential workers, the faculty lounge reopens for another round of COVID-19 analysis. On this episode: Can President Trump override state efforts to keep economies shuttered? Are there limits to the intrusive restrictions being enacted by the nation’s governors? Do churches (or abortion clinics) get special treatment during shutdowns? How can the Chinese government be held to account for the spread of coronavirus? What was the right response to the USS Roosevelt controversy? Was President Trump justified in removing a troublesome inspector general? And does a new report show it’s time to blow up the FISA proces? All that plus a Law Talk examination of Tom Brady’s new IP play, a sampling of avian life in John’s neighborhood, and we play “Which Prof is More Likely to Snap in Lockdown?

Richard Epstein reflects on his first run-in with Joe Biden — a stunt the former Vice President intended to derail Clarence Thomas’s Supreme Court nomination — and analyzes the policy platform of the de facto Democratic nominee.health carehealth care

Victor Davis Hanson analyzes the difficulties public officials face in addressing the coronavirus, considers the controversy around the USS Theodore Roosevelt, and addresses the media’s attempt to draw an equivalence between the United States and China.

Richard Epstein rebuts Harvard Law professor Adrian Vermeule’s recent plea in the Atlantic for ‘Common Good Constitutionalism,’ an approach that calls for conservatives to abandon classical liberalism.

Victor Davis Hanson considers the coronavirus’s effects on California, the United States, and America’s enemies abroad.

Richard Epstein considers the legal and economic issues around the government’s management of the Coronavirus.

Fresh off of a scrubdown, the faculty lounge has reopened for a special all-coronavirus episode. On the agenda: Where do the emergency authorities of the White House — and the states — begin and end? Can authorities close down gun stores as an emergency measure? Should the feds drive production of emergency supplies? Did the Justice Department use the crisis for a power grab? And would digital surveillance to stop the spread of COVID-19 run afoul of the Fourth Amendment? Find out the answers to all that and more on the world’s longest micro-episode.

Victor Davis Hanson describes how uncertainty and intellectual modesty should shape our response to COVID-19.

Victor Davis Hanson looks at the impact of the COVID-19 virus on American life; explains why panic will eventually have to give way to cost-benefit analysis; describes what the illness might mean for many of America’s adversaries; and takes a look back at other mass contagions that have shaped history.

Richard Epstein examines the sweeping legal authorities and dramatic economic interventions being called on to combat COVID-19 — and considers whether they’re proportionate to the problem.

Every other faculty lounge in America may be closed, but Professors Epstein and Yoo are still showing up to work. On this episode: what are the legal ramifications of the coronavirus? Can Catholic charities be excluded from providing adoption services because of their refusal to place children with same-sex couples? Is there any hope for President Trump’s libel lawsuits against the New York Times and Washington Post? Is encouraging an illegal immigrant to stay in the country a crime? Is the Supreme Court about to make a game-changing decision on abortion? And is getting hit by a foul ball about to be grounds for a lawsuit? All that plus the professors struggle with virtual classes, dish on tell-all books, and continue their annual tradition of making the nation’s most unreliable World Series predictions.

Richard Epstein analyzes the economic, political, and public health consequences of the coronavirus.single payer

Victor Davis Hanson casts a critical eye on the excesses of transnationalism, arguing that globalization has turned out to be a raw deal for many Americans.

Victor Davis Hanson describes why progressive excesses will lead to an inevitable decline for the hard left.