This week, Ricochet editor and podcaster to the stars Troy Senik stops by to talk about his new venture, Kite and Key Media, which produces explainers about issues in the news. So you could argue that this show is an explainer about explainers, but we are not going to be that meta. We also delve into the news of the day, including good governors and bad, what the heck is going on with President Biden, and some speculation on where the Republican party and the Conservative movement might be headed. Yes, we were supposed to have another guest this week, but that didn’t work out (maybe next week), so thanks to Troy for hanging out with us. Please return the favor by frequenting his new site?

Music from this week’s show: For The Benefit of Mr. Kite by The Beatles

The COVID pandemic brought sweeping change to America’s rental housing markets: widespread restrictions or outright prohibitions on evicting tenants. Are such policies effective? Are they constitutional? And from whence does a presidential or gubernatorial administration get such powers? Plus, how should we analyze claims that eviction rates demonstrate systemic racism at work? All that and more on a new episode of The Libertarian.

Victor Davis Hanson considers the Republican Party’s future as it deals with the long shadow cast by the presidency of Donald Trump. Should the GOP embrace a Trump comeback? Or should it attempt to find a new standard-bearer who can blend the Trump agenda with a different sensibility? And what’s the one issue to which VDH thinks the GOP hasn’t paid nearly enough attention? Tune in to find out.

Richard Epstein describes why immigration policy is fraught with complicated trade-offs that make hard-line positions — whether on the restrictionist side or the open-borders side — inappropriate. Along the way, he ventures into the debates over which criteria America should use to admit new immigrants, the effect of low-wage immigrants on American labor, whether it’s inconsistent to support free trade without supporting open borders, and why America has been so successful at assimilating immigrants from different races and cultures.

Victor Davis Hanson explores how military history can illuminate current foreign policy challenges, delineates which nations pose the greatest threats to the United States, explores the role that human rights should play in international affairs, looks at the changing shape of America’s alliances, and provides a reading list for future commanders-in-chief.

Richard Epstein analyzes the debate around Texas’ cold-weather blackouts. How much of the blame does climate change bear? Is the problem an excessive reliance on renewable energies or a failure to harden infrastructure against extreme weather events? And what do the Biden Administration’s policies mean for the future of grid resiliency?

There’s a party in the faculty lounge, as Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo — along with long-suffering host Troy Senik — celebrate the 10th anniversary of the podcast. A few special guests drop by, but we still have time for all the legal issues of the day: the aftermath of the Trump impeachment, a Texas’ judge’s smackdown of Joe Biden’s immigration policy, efforts to stifle conservative outlets on cable news and social media, and the Supreme Court’s controversial decision not to deal with an election challenge out of Pennsylvania. All that plus a member of the faculty lounge dressed like a Star Trek cast member, a look back on a decade of the show, and a crash course in presidential speeding tickets.

Richard Epstein describes his work on a case pitting Chicago conservationists against Barack Obama on plans for the former commander-in-chief’s presidential center.

Victor Davis Hanson diagnoses the biggest challenges facing America in the years ahead, from debt to immigration to Chinese aggression — and pauses for a special remembrance of his friend Rush Limbaugh.

Richard Epstein explains the history and sweep of American antitrust law, examines a proposal by Senator Amy Klobuchar to expand it, and argues that a more complex economy may actually justify less exacting antitrust policies.

In a sweeping new installment of The Classicist, Victor Davis Hanson looks at how the Left has moved from a countercultural movement in the 1960s to the commanding heights of American culture in the 2020s.

Victor Davis Hanson examines how progressivism has captured American institutions: everything from higher education to high finance, from tech to sports. Along the way, he explains what progressives’ cultural ascendance has revealed about their ideology, predicts what it means for the Right, and analyzes whether a backlash is imminent.

John Cochrane speaks with Wellington Management’s Owen Lamont on the recent attempts to influence the stock market and damage the liquidity of hedge funds by day traders using social media to coordinate their efforts.

Richard Epstein parses the wave of energy and environmental policies introduced in the early days of the Biden Administration, from the cancellation of the Keystone Pipeline to rejoining the Paris Climate Agreement to an emphasis on renewable energy and the potential of green jobs.

Victor Davis Hanson explains the work of President Trump’s 1776 Commission (a body on which he served), describes the decline of history as an academic discipline, and explains why humility is an essential ingredient when judging figures from the past.

Richard Epstein analyzes a raft of progressive policies coming out of the new Biden Administration on everything from energy to COVID to immigration to gun control.

Victor Davis Hanson analyzes how Joe Biden’s early policy moves contrast with his campaign-trail rhetoric, reflects on the last days of Donald Trump, and explains how a fractured Republican Party can move forward.

John Cochrane analyzes how a lack of market forces have impeded everything from the development of a COVID vaccine, to its distribution, to efforts to get the economy reopened.

Richard Epstein provides in-depth legal analysis of the 25th Amendment, the impeachment count against President Trump, the ability of Congress to bar a president from future office, and the legality of impeaching a president after he’s departed office.

Pack a lunch because this is the longest session we’ve ever held in the faculty lounge. In the final Law Talk of the Trump Administration, we break down all the events of the last week: Congress’s attempt to stymie the tallying of the electoral vote, the role of the Vice President, whether President Trump should be removed from office, a seeming breakdown in the chain of command, and a reaction to the president’s attempt to pressure Georgia’s Secretary of State. Then it’s on to the incoming Biden Administration, as the professors react to Merrick Garland’s nomination to be Attorney General, the push for statehood for Puerto Rico and Washington D.C., and the prospect of Justice Breyer’s retirement from the Supreme Court. Then we cap it all off with the professors’ final judgments on the Trump Administration. All that, plus breaking news from Twitter and McDonald’s and … less-than-breaking news from the annals of Roman Law.