Victor Davis Hanson describes how professional athletes and franchise owners have embraced the language of revolution while getting rich off of the status quo.

Victor Davis Hanson proposes a policy agenda — and a strategic posture — for the Trump campaign to take up in the presidential election.

Richard Epstein weighs in on a federal judge’s recent order to temporarily shut down the Dakota Access pipeline; explains how government regulations have crippled the country’s ability to build critical energy infrastructure; and makes the case that dreams of an economy fueled by renewable energy are a delusion.

There’s a full docket in the faculty lounge as Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo tackle the Roger Stone case and review the Supreme Court term that was: How did John Roberts justify taking both sides of the abortion regulations case within just a few years? Why does the Court get so many religious liberty cases these days — and is Antonin Scalia to blame? Has the pursuit of President Trump’s tax records seen SCOTUS open up a pandora’s box? And did the Court just give a huge chunk of Oklahoma back to Native Americans? All that plus the profs head to the suburbs, and we answer the question “Is it time to start worrying about Justice Gorsuch?” Also, remember to submit your questions for the upcoming Law Talk Q&A in the comments or to troy@ricochet.com

What will bring the wave of radical protests and cancel culture to an end? It would help if the leadership of America’s elite institutions grew a backbone.

Richard Epstein describes why reparations are unworkable, inadvisable, and represent a misdiagnosis of the problems facing African-Americans.

Victor Davis Hanson explores the historical, political, and economic aspects of the rural-urban divide — and its implications for American culture.

Richard Epstein examines the Supreme Court’s recent ruling preventing the Trump Administration from ending the DACA program — and criticizes Chief Justice Roberts for what he regards as an indefensible decision.

Victor Davis Hanson puts the efforts to uproot confederate iconography into historical perspective, examines the revolutionary zeal currently in fashion amongst progressive activists, and compares & contrasts this moment of American instability with otGeorge Floydhers in the nation’s past.

Summer school is starting early in the faculty lounge. On this episode, Professors Epstein and Yoo have a full agenda: Are Minnesota prosecutors setting themselves up for a fall in the Derek Chauvin case? Should the Supreme Court have taken a case that could have allowed it to pare back qualified immunity? What should we make of Justice Gorsuch’s surprising turn in the LGBT discrimination case? Or Chief Justice Roberts siding with the court’s liberals in subjecting California churches to strict COVID protocols? Does President Trump have the power to stop John Bolton’s book from being released? And, finally, can we find eternal truths about intellectual property law in the battle between a couple of authors of wolf-themed erotica? At least one professor thinks so!

John Cochrane provides a critical examination of Modern Monetary Theory — and explains why an innovative financial instrument known as a perpetual bond may improve America’s ability to manage its debt load.

Richard Epstein parses some of the most prominent recent proposals for criminal justice reform and analyzes the shift in American race relations over the past decade.

Victor Davis Hanson looks at how the protest movement inspired by the death of George Floyd has morphed from a legitimate lament of tragedy into a dangerous, revolutionary crusade.

Richard Epstein analyzes the charges against the Minneapolis police officer involved in George Floyd’s death, considers whether existing law is excessively protective of law enforcement, and explains the parameters of government power to deal with civil unrest.

Victor Davis Hanson takes listeners on a tour of the chaos emerging in the wake of COVID-19: increased political polarization, a tidal wave of debt, and an emboldened China.

John Cochrane analyzes the difficulties of reopening the American economy with restrictive new protocols, argues that the enthusiasm for bringing industry back from China is overwrought, and warns that the risk of future inflation is real.

With Twitter’s decision to append fact-checks to Donald Trump’s tweets, new questions are emerging about how much social media should regulate politicians — and how much government should regulate social media.

Richard Epstein argues that the long and sordid case of Michael Flynn illustrates the importance of putting limits on the power of federal prosecutors — and explains the reforms that are necessary to create a better Department of Justice.

While everyone else is holding their graduation ceremonies on Zoom, professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo are still hard at work in the faculty lounge. On this installment: Is the end of the Michael Flynn case justice served or justice denied? Should sexual assault cases be tried on college campuses? Can the government stick the landing on the end of coronavirus lockdowns? Does the Supreme Court’s rejection of the Bridgegate convictions mean a free-for-all on government corruption? And is President Trump about to dodge a bullet on his tax returns? All that plus Epstein and a small child stare out a window, Yoo explores the black market in haircuts, and we finally get to the bottom of the Supreme Court’s mid-oral arguments toilet flush.

Richard Epstein analyzes the congressional debate over whether the federal government should insulate business from Coronavirus-related lawsuits.