Richard Epstein scrutinizes the Senate’s confirmation process for Amy Coney Barrett, considers how much deference legislators should give to presidents of the opposite party for their judicial picks, and describes which areas of law he thinks a more conservative court should focus on reforming.

Richard Epstein previews some of the most contentious cases on the docket in the new Supreme Court term. Will a change to the individual mandate spell the end of the Affordable Care Act? Can religious organizations be excluded from placing foster children if they refuse to work with same-sex couples? And what role will the Court play in the tumultuous 2020 election?

Victor Davis Hanson analyzes the first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden, explains why Biden’s positions have become hard to pin down for the first time in nearly 50 years, and looks at what the differences between the candidates might mean for the future of American foreign policy.

An emergency meeting has been called in the faculty lounge as professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo react to the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, sharing their personal remembrances of the late justice and reflecting on her judicial legacy. Then, an analysis of what’s to come: Should the Senate steam ahead with confirmation (there’s a divide in the faculty lounge)? Which of the prospective nominees should President Trump choose? What are the odds that the GOP will once again find itself undermined by a justice who ‘evolves’ on the court? And how credible are Democratic threats of court-packing? All that and more in our comprehensive coverage of the biggest legal story of the year.

Victor Davis Hanson describes the myriad dysfunctions besetting state government in California, a state once known as a national pacesetter.

In their new book, Law and Leviathan: Redeeming the Administrative State, Harvard Law professors Cass Sunstein and Adrian Vermeule mount a defense of the federal government’s maze of policymaking agencies and departments — institutions that many critics say operate outside of the nation’s constitutional architecture and any meaningful democratic controls.

Earlier this year, Professor Epstein released his own book, The Dubious Morality of Modern Administrative Law, making precisely the opposite case. Tune in as Professor Epstein explains the differences between the two sides and explains what an effective, constitutionally-constrained administrative state would look like.

John Cochrane examines the headwinds facing American cities in light of the COVID pandemic, urban riots, and economic hardships. Are these the leading indicators of a post-urban future? Or are our cities more resilient than we give them credit for?

Victor Davis Hanson explains how the social unrest unleashed in 2020 threatens urban decline, increasing political animosity, and the erosion of Americans’ common identity.

Richard Epstein explains the economic problems inherent to organized labor, describes how public policy has locked them into place, and cautions against the strand of conservative populism that aims to develop an alternative union model for the 21st century.

Richard Epstein examines the case for whether “institutional racism” really exists in America, describes how authorities should react when protests devolve into violence, and reflects on whether Americans can reverse the last few years’ decline in race relations.

In an August faculty lounge tradition, Professors Epstein & Yoo are taking listener questions — and it’s an eclectic bunch. Tune in as the professors debate everything from the limits of stare decisis to whether Barack Obama could be Vice President; from whether there should be more politicians on the Supreme Court to the legal problems with Dred Scott (yes, it involves Roman law); from the lack of intellectual diversity on college campuses to the radicalism in Seattle’s city government

On the 75th anniversary of World War II’s conclusion, Victor Davis Hanson looks at how the war continues to shape international affairs, and points listeners towards some of the war’s underappreciated figures.

Richard Epstein analyzes a trio of policy mistakes in California: the renewable energy mandates that have led to rolling blackouts, the restrictions on contractors that have Uber and Lyft looking for the exits, and a proposed wealth tax that would hit citizens even if they move out of state.

Richard Epstein analyzes the legality of President Trump’s recent executive orders on COVID relief and explains how executive orders fit into the constitutional order.

Victor Davis Hanson explains the philosophical underpinnings of the Trump Administration’s foreign policy — and explains how it’s affected America’s relationships with China, Iran, Russia, and North Korea.

Richard Epstein considers the complaints lodged against major tech firms at a recent congressional hearing: Everything from anti-competitive practices to allegations that they attempt to censor conservative voices.

Richard Epstein analyses the legal and political propriety of the Trump Administration’s decision to deploy federal forces to Portland, analyzes the factors behind increasing lawlessness in major cities, and puts America’s current struggle with urban unrest in historical context.

Victor Davis Hanson describes how professional athletes and franchise owners have embraced the language of revolution while getting rich off of the status quo.

Victor Davis Hanson proposes a policy agenda — and a strategic posture — for the Trump campaign to take up in the presidential election.

Richard Epstein weighs in on a federal judge’s recent order to temporarily shut down the Dakota Access pipeline; explains how government regulations have crippled the country’s ability to build critical energy infrastructure; and makes the case that dreams of an economy fueled by renewable energy are a delusion.