Once a year we throw open the doors of the faculty lounge and let the Law Talk audience ask questions of Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo. This year’s result: a conversation that touches on everything from acquiring Greenland to whether John Adams was a constitutional scofflaw, from whether federal courts have gotten too trigger happy with injunctions to which foods make the professors wretch. Most importantly: which class did Richard struggle with in law school? The answer will … not surprise you at all.

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Richard Epstein analyzes the multitude of Democratic gun control proposals in the wake of the El Paso and Dayton shootings, proposes an alternative strategy for dealing with mass gun violence, and weighs the merits of proposed “red flag” laws.

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Richard Epstein describes the catastrophic consequences that single-payer healthcare will have for both the economy and the medical profession.

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Richard Epstein uses new cases from Chicago and San Diego — in both of which he is serving as counsel — to illustrate how government land use regulations often serve the desires of powerful interests while harming everyday citizens.

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Victor Davis Hanson explores the factors driving the social, economic, and political decline of California.

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Victor Davis Hanson explains why a change in circumstances since the Bush years necessitate a changed approach to the U.S. relationship with Iran.

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Richard Epstein shares his memories of the moon landing and reflects on what NASA’s history says about the capabilities — and limits — of the federal government.

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Richard Epstein looks back on the career of the late Justice John Paul Stevens, reviewing some of his most consequential judicial decisions.

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It’s time for summer school in the faculty lounge and Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo are reviewing the Supreme Court term that was. On this episode: was the census ruling a backdoor victory for critics of the administrative state? Are critics right that Alex Acosta should have done more to prosecute Jeffrey Epstein? John gives us one weird trick for determining when religious symbols are allowed on government property. And the professors weigh in on the legal repercussions of renegade ice cream licking. All that plus Epstein’s tips for how to defraud grocery stores, Yoo condemns a legendary American political figure to eternal damnation, and we get a faculty lounge review of Maine’s state soft drink.

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Richard Epstein analyzes a recent Second Circuit decision that President Trump violated the First Amendment by blocking Twitter followers.

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Richard Epstein provides a thorough analysis of the intellectual history of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

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Richard Epstein provides an in-depth history of takings law, examining the protections against government appropriation of private property. Along the way he considers the recent Supreme Court ruling in Knick v. Township of Scott, Pennsylvania, which greatly expands the rights of property owners.

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A new strain of conservative intellectuals think an embrace of free-market economics should take a backseat to a more communitarian approach. At the same time, an energized group of progressives wants to dramatically expand the reach of the federal government. Both groups take as read that the free market isn’t adequately serving the public’s needs. Richard Epstein examines those claims and explains the vital factor missing from both diagnoses: the importance of civil society.

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Richard Epstein explains the parameters of antitrust law — and why the efforts to apply it to Google, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon are misguided.

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Richard Epstein considers whether Donald Trump has correctly assessed the threat from Chinese trade practices, analyzes whether widespread tariff increases are an effective tool to combat them, and explains why he reluctantly prefers Trump’s economic policies over those that may have emerged from a more conventional Republican president.

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With a new wave of congressional progressives claiming America is insufficiently committed to social justice, Victor Davis Hanson defends the country’s history of progress — and explains why it was dependent on traditions of western civilization that the critics now denounce.

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Victor Davis Hanson examines the strategic calculations behind China’s economic, political, military, and cultural initiatives.

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It’s a lively session in the faculty lounge as Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo navigate a minefield of legal controversies: what do Alabama’s new restrictions on abortion mean for the future of Roe v. Wade? What’s the proper libertarian position on compulsory vaccinations? Does Congress have a leg to stand on in its pursuit of Bill Barr? Was Harvard wrong to turn its back on a professor who’s defending Harvey Weinstein? And then, the professors finally answer the question you’ve waited years for: are bans on toplessness unconstitutional? We guarantee you’ll leave disturbed.

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Richard Epstein examines the difficult legal and philosophical questions that emerge when widespread opt-outs from vaccination threaten herd immunity.

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Richard Epstein breaks down the fight between the Justice Department and the House over the Mueller Report, providing a history of executive privilege (what it is, what it isn’t, and where it came from), an examination of what it really means for Congress to hold someone in contempt, and explains when and under what circumstances the White House can prevent congressional testimony.

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