It may be Presidents Day (it’s not, actually — more on that later), but the faculty lounge is still open for business. In this months’ session, Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo are tackling the latest revelations from the Mueller investigation, what can be done about gun violence consistent with the Second Amendment, and whether restrictions on free speech have gone too far on college campuses.

Plus they’re weighing on the most overrated and underrated presidents (in pursuit of the elusive ‘Franklin Pierce fanboy’ demo), unnecessarily quoting Latin (guess who), and, yes, giving Professor Yoo, Philadelphia Eagles devotee, his moment in the sun.

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A funny thing happened to America’s libertarian movement – it expected a champion to emerge in the 2016 election; it may or may not have one in Donald Trump. Richard Epstein, the Hoover Institution’s Peter and Kirsten Bedford Senior Fellow and the voice behind “The Libertarian” podcast, grades the Trump presidency from a libertarian vantage.

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It’s the first Law Talk of the new year and Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo are starting off 2018 with verve. On this installment: who looks worse in the Mueller investigation, President Trump or the FBI? Is trading DACA for a border wall a grand bargain or a big mistake? Can California prosecute business owners for working with federal immigration authorities? Can blue states sue their way out of the new tax law? Will the Supreme Court overhaul internet taxation? Do federal judges really need clerks? And does the Americans with Disabilities Act protect “obnoxious chronic body odor”?

All that plus John Yoo, long-suffering Philadelphia Eagles fan, enjoys the sensation of human joy for the first time in his life. We can’t bring ourself to tell the guy what’s coming next.

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On the final Law Talk of 2017, Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo are taking a look back at the year that was. First, an assessment of President Trump’s first year in office, on matters both foreign and domestic. Is it possible that our dynamic duo is warming to The Donald? Then, what do the Kate Steinle verdict and recent terrorist attacks in New York tell us about the shortcomings of American immigration policy? What does the future hold for the Mueller investigation? What will be the biggest legal stories of 2018? What are the professors’ New Years resolutions? And why did the 1980 Philadelphia Eagles nearly derail the construction of Richard’s house? Tune in to find out!

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It’s a pre-Thanksgiving session in the faculty lounge, and Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo have prepared a feast of legal analysis. On the menu: Can the military really overrule President Trump in the event of a nuclear strike? Will the Supreme Court force crisis pregnancy centers to promote abortion? Is a new plan to expand the federal judiciary just GOP court-packing? And is Donald Trump violating the constitution by blocking people on Twitter?

All that plus Epstein on the economics of Thanksgiving, Yoo on the McRib app (it’s a thing), and, yes, a little bit of Roman law as our holiday gift to you.

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Richard Epstein responds to suggestions that the Justice Department may appoint a special prosecutor to probe corruption allegations around Hillary Clinton. Also on the docket: exactly how independent of presidential prerogative should attorneys general be? Is it time for Jeff Sessions to step aside? And are the legal suspicions around both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton evidence of a decline in America’s leadership class — or proof that, for all its flaws, the system still works?

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Richard Epstein explains the contents of President Trump’s new executive order on healthcare, explores the controversy around a White House proposal to cut subsidies to insurers, and explains why conservatives who fretted about President Obama’s use of executive orders shouldn’t be bothered by this exercise of executive power.

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