Many Americans celebrated the end of Roe vs Wade. Others are deeply angered and worried. The question of abortion is not a simple one, and merits thoughtful discourse and kindness rather than hysteria or trimphalism. Any discussion also requires a real look at the facts; what is the legal basis of this ruling? Where does the pro-life movement stand? What does pro-choice Americans really want? In this episode we try to provide a model for how to approach the conversations ahead with Robby George, one of our nation’s most respected political philosophers.

Robert George is the sixth McCormick professor of jurisprudence and the director of the James Madison program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University. He is a past winner of the American Enterprise Institute’s Irving Kristol Award.

Since our episode on inflation with Glenn Hubbard last month, his dire predictions about a likely recession have gathered steam. And though we’re not yet officially in a recession, Americans’ economic pain is only growing: New record average high gas prices in June, likely rolling blackouts, shocking inflation at the supermarket and now the cost of money has skyrocketed too. Meanwhile, here in Washington, the President continues to go on vacation every weekend, deny that inflation is his fault, and push a mindless spending agenda. How did the Fed, White House economists, and mainstream professional forecasters get it so wrong? And perhaps more importantly, what should be done going forward?

These questions and more on today’s episode with Michael Strain. Strain is the Director of Economic Studies at the American Enterprise Institute.

Is the news out of Ukraine as bad as it sounds?  Russia may not be able to hold out as long as Putin believes, but the Ukrainian military desperately requires longer-range missiles to beat back the offensive in Luhansk. Ukraine’s putative allies are failing to “flood the zone,” and do not seem to realize that a frozen conflict is a strategic pause for the Russians, not the end of the game. Domestic politics and news headlines alike reflect a desire to move on, yet Ukraine is at a critical inflection point in Severodonetsk, the last significant Ukrainian prepared defensive position within Luhansk Oblast. How do we ensure that we don’t look back at this moment years from now, only to conclude that delays in aiding Ukraine helped the Russian offensive gain a critical strategic advantage?

These questions and more in today’s conversation with George Barros. Barros is a geospatial analyst on the Russia and Ukraine portfolio at the Institute for the Study of War (ISW). Check out ISW’s daily interactive map linked on the transcript, which he helps each week to update.

Today’s episode is an exploration of the core question gripping our country in the weeks following the Uvalde shooting: how can we prevent such attacks in the future? A terrible pattern repeats again in the recent Uvalde case: a teenager exhibits disturbing behavior before he commits a gun-related crime. With no criminal record, what should have been “tell-tale” signs the shooter was a danger? Jim Geraghty suggests that tougher background checks are not the answer, or at least not the whole answer. In addition, with straw buyers (think grandmothers) purchasing firearms for their teenage grandsons—not to mention the fact that the Pentagon puts more guns in the hands of young adults than anyone else in this country— raising the age restriction may not cut it. It may not even pass legal muster. The challenge isn’t simple, but there are solutions. Marc and Dany explore creative options that could move us forward, and learn why efforts to ban certain kinds of weapons might not with National Review’s Jim Geraghty.

Jim Geraghty is the Senior Political Correspondent of National Review. He writes their Morning Jolt newsletter, and hosts the Three Martini Lunch podcast.

This is America – how can we have a shortage of baby formula? That’s the question many parents are asking as they face bare Soviet-style store shelves. In a country with ample means, how did America arrive at what is essentially a food shortage? How did three main domestic baby formula companies come to control 98% of their market? Parent or not, this issue has implications for everyone—it is a case study that involves government regulations, supply chain, monopolies under the guise of capitalism, and barriers to free trade. Or, as one of the podcast’s guests notes, “a perfect storm.”

Marc and Dany explore this puzzling situation with guests Annie Gasparro and Jesse Newman, Wall Street Journal reporters covering the scandal. Gasparro is a food reporter with the WSJ Chicago bureau and writes about packaged food companies and consumer tastes. Newman is also a food reporter with the WSJ corporate bureau, covering farmers, ranchers, and food companies.

Do Russians really support Vladimir Putin’s aggression and war crimes in Ukraine? On the weekend of April 1st, Western media shared photos and videos of a brutal massacre in Bucha, Ukraine. The gruesome reports prompted a fresh wave of outrage over Russian war crimes. This week saw the first Ukrainian war crimes trial that ended in confession and conviction for a Russian soldier. But Russians in government and outside continue to insist that the Bucha massacre is “fake,” or “Western agenda-setting.” More troubling still are broad Russian civilian calls to annihilate the “sub-human” Ukrainians.

Marc and Dany explore this disturbing trend with Ian Garner on today’s episode. Garner is a historian and a translator of Russian war propaganda. His first book, Stalingrad Lives: Stories of Combat and Survival, was published in 2022.

Last week we saw the first leak in Supreme Court history – a draft opinion that reversed the landmark Roe v Wade ruling of 1973 and shot the topic of abortion back into the headlines. Former Supreme Court clerk John Yoo joins Dany and Marc again to discuss the legal implications of overturning Roe v Wade, the reasoning behind the leak, and the options before the nation’s voters as they weigh the prospective ruling. Is Roe good law? Does it matter? And do the American people care that issues before the highest court in the land and the nomination of justices have taken on the “character of a political campaign.”

These questions and more on this week’s episode with guest John Yoo. Yoo is a former clerk for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. He is currently the Emmanuel Heller professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley school of law. He is a scholar at both the American Enterprise Institute and the Hoover Institution.

Nuclear saber-rattling, threats to expand the war, and $33 billion in new aid: General Jack Keane joins Marc and Dany to discuss the direction of the war in Ukraine. Putin’s efforts have shifted from Kyiv to the self-declared Donetsk and Luhansk regions, and it’s still not going well. Meanwhile, on the home front, Biden has apparently turned a corner, now aiming to support an outright Ukrainian victory with more weaponry and a proposed $33 billion aid package. Will Putin’s military failures continue, or will he shift tactics and target neighboring regions? How strong is White House resolve to help President Zelensky achieve an uncompromised win? And how should Biden and Zelensky respond should Putin introduce nuclear weapons to the conflict?

These questions and more on this week’s episode with guest General Jack Keane. Jack Keane is a retired four-star general, former Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army and a Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient. He is the chairman of the Institute for the Study of War, and a Fox News senior strategic analyst.

Nuclear saber-rattling, threats to expand the war, and $33 billion in new aid: General Jack Keane joins Marc and Dany to discuss the direction of the war in Ukraine. Putin’s efforts have shifted from Kyiv to the self-declared Donetsk and Luhansk regions, and it’s still not going well. Meanwhile, on the home front, Biden has apparently turned a corner, now aiming to support an outright Ukrainian victory with more weaponry and a proposed $33 billion aid package. Will Putin’s military failures continue, or will he shift tactics and target neighboring regions? How strong is White House resolve to help President Zelensky achieve an uncompromised win? And how should Biden and Zelensky respond should Putin introduce nuclear weapons to the conflict?

These questions and more on this week’s episode with guest General Jack Keane. Jack Keane is a retired four-star general, former Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army and a Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient. He is the chairman of the Institute for the Study of War, and a Fox News senior strategic analyst.

Is good old American flag waving patriotism dead, only to be replaced with chauvinistic nationalism, or worse, anti-Americanism? Perhaps thinking of national pride as something rooted in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the U.S.’ proud history is too 20thcentury; maybe it is no longer working? Indeed, in a country in which history and civics get short shrift in education, it should come as no surprise that many under 50 feel no pride, no patriotic sense as Americans. But there may be another way – a new cultural patriotism, in which people have pride in the country they know rather than in the traditions that have spawned national holidays and parades. Will that work?

Yascha Mounk joined Dany and Marc to discuss the findings of his new book The Great Experiment: Why Diverse Democracies Fall Apart and How They Can Endure (Penguin Press). He discusses the concept of cultural patriotism, the problem of multiculturalism and assimilation. They also debate the metaphor of America’s melting pot, American exceptionalism, and the ideals that make America the best country on earth. 

The American Right is at a crossroads. Donald Trump’s presidency continues to divide and challenge the conservative movement both intellectually and politically. What is the future of a principles-first movement in the era of America-First populism? Issues like immigration, the international rules-based order, partisan media, and rising military threats place countervailing pressures on a conservative movement struggling to define its future.

Matt Continetti joined Dany and Marc to discuss his new book, “The Right: The Hundred Year War for American Conservatism” (Basic Books, 2022). The book examines a century of the history of the American Right, Warren Harding to Donald Trump. Matt, Dany and Marc analyze historic ties between the conservative movement and populism and the tension between grassroots conservatives and elites. They also talk about implications for foreign policy and the isolationist streak among conservatives.

Amid the death and destruction from Russia’s invasion of his country, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky surprised many when he pronounced last month that his “life today is wonderful.” How can Zelensky—whose war-torn homeland is experiencing increasingly intense fighting and growing civilian casualties—be so optimistic despite the dire circumstances? Is it possible for everyday people to realize the same sense of happiness, courage, and purpose? Is there a secret to happiness and purpose that we can use in our everyday lives to achieve true success?

Arthur C. Brooks joined Marc and Dany to discuss the roadmap for finding purpose, meaning, and success in life, his journey to form new life practices and transform his future, the folly of being addicted to achievement, and his latest #1 bestseller “From Strength to Strength: Finding Happiness and Deep Purpose in the Second Half of Life.”

Outrage over Russian President Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine intensified this weekend as horrific reports of Russian war crimes emerged and shocked the world. In what Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky described as “genocide,” more than 400 civilians were found dead in the northern Ukrainian town of Bucha after it was seized back from Russian forces—with many of those killed shot at close range with their hands tied behind their backs. Despite the Kremlin’s denial that Russian forces were responsible for the killings, Western leaders have called for additional sanctions on Moscow as evidence of similar Russian atrocities throughout Ukraine increases. How should the US and NATO hold Putin accountable? Will Russia’s war crimes in Ukraine mark a tipping point in the conflict?

Despite predictions of a swift victory for Russian President Vladimir Putin, Ukrainian forces continue to inspire the world as they hold their ground and thwart Russian invasion forces. Since the launch of its attack on Ukraine in February, the Russian military has faced heavy resistance and a growing number of casualties—NATO estimates that up to 40,000 Russian troops have been killed, injured, captured, or gone missing during the first month of the conflict. With its strategic position weakening, Moscow announced this week that it would “dramatically” scale back its military activities around Kyiv. However, Russian forces still pose a significant threat to the capital, and despite continued pleas from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, the West has been reluctant to increase its support or provide Ukraine with the fighter aircraft it needs to defend its skies.

Ambassador Kurt Volker joined Marc and Dany to discuss the ramifications of Russia’s inevitable defeat in Ukraine, the Biden administration’s handling of the crisis, and the future of Ukraine.

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine has brought horror and misery to millions and challenged the US-led international order to an extent unseen since the Cold War. As NATO struggles to mount an effective response to Russia’s aggression, a growing alliance of dictatorships led by Putin and China’s Xi Jinping is attempting to shape the geopolitical order to their interests and against those of the US. With casualties rising in Ukraine and growing fears of a Chinese invasion of Taiwan, does the US now find itself in a new Cold War?

Matt Pottinger joins Marc and Dany to discuss the new cold war, the conflict’s ideological underpinnings, and the historical analogies that help explain Putin’s invasion of Ukraine.

This past week, plans to bolster Ukraine’s military defenses with MiG fighter jets were derailed when President Biden refused to permit the transfer of the fighters to Ukraine. With the White House and NATO also rejecting a “no-fly zone” over Ukraine, the war’s civilian toll continues to rise. As the war drags, a growing number of Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill are calling on the President to ramp up military aid to Ukraine and provide Kyiv with the military assistance it requested.

Rep. Jimmy Panetta (D) joined Marc and Dany to discuss the Biden administration’s response to Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, the repercussions of the US response in Ukraine, and what the White House needs to do to support Ukraine.

As Russia continues its bloody invasion of Ukraine, the United States and its NATO allies have responded by levying wide-ranging sanctions against Moscow as well as providing Kyiv with humanitarian, security, and economic assistance. However, according to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, the aid has been largely insufficient in helping turn back the almost two-week-long Russian campaign. With Ukrainian cities increasingly under siege and intelligence estimates suggesting Russian President Vladimir Putin may soon escalate his offensive, this week President Zelensky pleaded for the US and NATO to step up their support by establishing a no-fly zone over the country, banning the purchase of Russian oil, and helping secure more fighter jets. (Late breaking news suggests a NATO deal is underway to get Polish MiGs to Ukraine.)

Radosław Sikorski joined Marc and Dany to discuss Russia’s ongoing invasion of Ukraine, President Zelensky’s request for more support from the US and NATO, and the implications of an increased Western response in Ukraine.

As Russia’s violent assault on Ukraine enters its second week, causalities on both sides have been climbing, and many of Ukraine’s largest cities remain under siege. Despite Russian combat operations initially facing severe setbacks as a result of a determined Ukrainian resistance, the Russian offensive has been gaining ground in recent days, with Russian troops capturing their first major city, the southern port of Kherson.

Dr. Frederick W. Kagan joined Marc and Dany to discuss the current military state of play in Ukraine, Putin’s initial miscalculations, and the Ukrainian people’s heroic stand against Putin’s aggression.

This week, Russian President Vladimir Putin officially recognized the independence of the Moscow-backed breakaway Ukrainian regions of Donetsk and Luhansk and ordered Russian troops to enter the Donbas. After what President Biden (ultimately) called the “beginning of a Russian invasion,” Russia’s blatant violation of Ukrainian national sovereignty has triggered a wave of sanctions from both the US and our European partners. With tensions rising and no sign of Putin being deterred, hopes for a diplomatic resolution continue to fade while the likelihood of more serious confrontation in Ukraine grows by the hour.

General Jack Keane joined Dany and Marc to discuss Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, Moscow’s recognition of two breakaway regions in the Donbas, and the ramifications for US national security if President Biden fails to act.

In late January, a group of truckers calling themselves the “Freedom Convoy” traveled to the Canadian capital of Ottawa to protest Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s cross-border vaccine mandates. However, what started as a modest protest has since mushroomed into a broader movement opposed to Trudeau, vaccine mandates, and draconian Covid restrictions. With over $7.8 million in donations from supporters, the “Freedom Convoy” has inspired similar demonstrations not only across Canada—where protesters blockaded North America’s busiest land border crossing for almost a week— but also in New Zealand, France, Netherlands, and most recently, the United States. In an effort to end the ongoing protests, this week, Trudeau invoked the never-used-before Emergencies Act, giving the Canadian government the broad powers and the authority to take steps to “restore order.”

Canadian columnist Anthony Furey joined Marc and Dany to discuss Canada’s trucker protests, Prime Minister Trudeau’s invocation of the Emergencies Act, Canada’s draconian COVID restrictions, and how the Canadian government is progressively taking away its own citizens freedoms.