As Massachusetts senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren tries to bribe college students into voting for her with promises of student loan debt forgiveness and free college, the Young Americans draw from their own experiences to discuss Warren’s plan, the student loan debt crisis, and what, if anything, we can do about it.

More

The Young Americans return for another year of charting Millennial neuroses by starting out with the topic on everyone’s mind: marriage. Specifically, why aren’t Millennials getting married? To help figure out why, (single) host Jack Butler consults another single person, an engaged person, and a married couple.

More

Mayonnaise. Home Depot. Breakfast. Lunch. Vacations. Golf. Like some assiduous predator stalking in the cultural night, the Millennial generation has killed each of these things, one by one…or has it? The latest episode takes up the trend of Millennials’ killing things, such as the aforementioned items, and tries to determine whether their guilt is fair or misplaced. Each guest also picks a thing they hope Millennials do kill.

Also, the Young Americans proudly sell out once again, as this episode is brought to you by Simple Contacts.

More

Goo goo g’joob! As The Beatles (a.k.a., The White Album) reaches its 50th anniversary, the Young Americans take some time on a hard day’s night to have a long and winding discussion about whether The Beatles really are the greatest band of all time (the answer is yes), and whether they still matter and should be in your life (the answer is also yes).

More

This month, the gamer known as “Ninja” became the first “esports” “athlete” to grace the front cover of ESPN Magazine. As “esports”–i.e., playing video games in a professional competitive setting–grow in popularity, the Young Americans debate whether this portends ill for their cohort, and wonder if video games are taking over society as a whole.

More

As the Young Americans find themselves in the dog days of summer, they wonder whether the “fur-ternity leave” now offered by some companies proves that young people love dogs too much. And with summer coming to a close, they also give some advice for college students going back to school or heading there for the first time.

More

The latest episode of the Young Americans is brought to you by Ricochet (of course), and by the concept of ownership: of libs, an increasingly popular posture on the right, including among young conservatives, and of homes, which young people are apparently not buying. The Young Americans attempt to explore and explain both of these trends, while learning in the end that what mattered most was the friends they made along the way. (Awww…)

More

In their third episode, the Young Americans take the occasion of the recent New York primary victory of 28-year-old self-declared socialist Millennial Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to wonder if their peers really are all socialists now, or are just going through a phase. They also reflect on the 10th anniversary of The Dark Knight and debate whether it is the best blockbuster released in their (so far relatively short) lifetimes.

More

With their name now official, the Young Americans take care of some unfinished business from the first episode, despite having two different guests. But they spend most of this episode discussing what the difficulty young Trump administration officials are having getting dates (as reported by Politico) says about both our political culture and our dating culture, drawing, in part, from their own dating experiences.

More

In this, the debut episode of the Young Americans (we changed the name from “Young Folks” after recording), Jack Butler, of the Remnant with Jonah Goldberg, and his youthful interlocutors justify their podcast to a candid world, debate whether young people have to move to big cities to succeed in life, and wonder whether Incredibles 2 is yet another example of Hollywood’s nostalgia- and laziness-driven reliance on sequels.

More