Misha is joined by Tom Tugendhat MP, Oxford’s Rana Mitter, and Cindy Yu, of The Spectator, to talk about the UK’s new Integrated Review and its focus on China and the Indo-Pacific.  They discuss London’s focus on expanding Britain’s presence in Asia, how London will deal with China, the role of US-UK cooperation in Asia under the Biden Administration, and how Britain will work with Asian partners like Australia, Japan, and India.

John and Misha are joined by Eric Schmidt, former Chairman and CEO of Google/Alphabet and chairman of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence. Eric discusses the ways in which the US can win the tech competition with China, why AI is the crucial technology of the future, the proper role of government policy, the divide between Washington and Silicon Valley, where the US fell short in 5G, building talent at home, and how to work with techno-democracies.

John and Misha are joined by Tom Tugendhat MP, from London, for a discussion with Michele Flournoy, Undersecretary of Defense for Policy in the Obama Administration, on the China challenge, whether the US is maintaining its edge in the Pacific, the role of allies, the impact of new technologies, and the threat of war.

There’s a party in the faculty lounge, as Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo — along with long-suffering host Troy Senik — celebrate the 10th anniversary of the podcast. A few special guests drop by, but we still have time for all the legal issues of the day: the aftermath of the Trump impeachment, a Texas’ judge’s smackdown of Joe Biden’s immigration policy, efforts to stifle conservative outlets on cable news and social media, and the Supreme Court’s controversial decision not to deal with an election challenge out of Pennsylvania. All that plus a member of the faculty lounge dressed like a Star Trek cast member, a look back on a decade of the show, and a crash course in presidential speeding tickets.

Taking a short break from Asia, Misha and John welcome back their friend and colleague H.R. McMaster, to remember his pivotal role in the Battle of 73 Easting in the Iraq War, on February 26, 1991—the last great tank battle of the 20th century.

Misha hosts the Royal Navy’s White Ensign, for a talk with Britain’s First Sea Lord, Admiral Tony Radakin. They discuss why the Royal Navy is returning to the Asia-Pacific, the upcoming deployment of the new HMS Queen Elizabeth to the South China Sea, the China challenge, and cooperation with the US Navy, Royal Australian Navy, and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force.

Misha and John travel to Hong Kong to talk with Dominic Ziegler, longtime Asia correspondent for The Economist and the author of the paper’s “Banyan” column. They discuss whether there will be blood in Burma after the military coup last week, then they switch to talking about new Chinese threats to the South China Sea, what Asia fears about Joe Biden’s policies, and finally, the tragedy of Hong Kong under PRC rule.

Misha and John are joined by their Hoover colleague and director of the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff, Peter Berkowitz, to discuss his major report on China.  Inspired by George Kennan’s famous Long Telegram, Peter discusses the sources of Chinese conduct and the challenge to US and global interests

This week, John and Misha talk with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo about the Trump Administration’s China policy.  What were their successes?  What more did he wish he could have done?  Most important, where does America go from here?  After visiting with the Secretary, Misha and John talk about China’s latest repression in Hong Kong, about threats to Taiwan, and about whether the US intelligence community is accurately analyzing China.

Pack a lunch because this is the longest session we’ve ever held in the faculty lounge. In the final Law Talk of the Trump Administration, we break down all the events of the last week: Congress’s attempt to stymie the tallying of the electoral vote, the role of the Vice President, whether President Trump should be removed from office, a seeming breakdown in the chain of command, and a reaction to the president’s attempt to pressure Georgia’s Secretary of State. Then it’s on to the incoming Biden Administration, as the professors react to Merrick Garland’s nomination to be Attorney General, the push for statehood for Puerto Rico and Washington D.C., and the prospect of Justice Breyer’s retirement from the Supreme Court. Then we cap it all off with the professors’ final judgments on the Trump Administration. All that, plus breaking news from Twitter and McDonald’s and … less-than-breaking news from the annals of Roman Law.

The faculty lounge has reopened for its holiday party, but there’s still plenty of business to dispense with. On this final installment of 2020, Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo are tackling a stocking full of issues: Does a suit from the Texas Attorney General stand any chance of being the Hail Mary that the Trump campaign needs? Can the courts rein in the Michael Flynn pardon? Who’s the least menacing candidate to be Joe Biden’s Attorney General? Does the Supreme Court’s smackdown of Andrew Cuomo represent a turning point on COVID restrictions? Will the justices save President Trump’s plan to exclude illegal immigrants from the census? Has the era of government by executive order gone too far? And finally, how, is it possible that Gavin Newsom can unilaterally end the automobile as we know it in California?

This week, John returns as Pacific Century visits London, to talk with Tom Tugendhat MP.  Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee in the House of Commons and head of the China Research Group, Tom discusses the China Research Group’s new report on dealing with a more assertive Chinese Communist Party.  He explains how the UK’s China policy has evolved over the past several years, including its turnaround on Huawei.  He also looks ahead at how London might work with the new Biden administration.

It’s a Thanksgiving feast of legal analysis in the faculty lounge (don’t worry, the profs issue opinions on the best side dishes for your holiday meal), as Richard Epstein & John Yoo convene for their first post-election session. On the menu: Do any of President Trump’s legal challenges to the outcome of the election have a chance in court? Are attempts to get state legislatures to change their electoral votes constitutional? Would a president Joe Biden actually have the power to issue a national mask mandate? Will increasingly restrictive COVID rules at the state level withstand scrutiny by the courts? Was Justice Alito out of line to issue politically-charged remarks at the Federalist Society convention? And finally, the question of the hour: does President Trump have the power to pardon himself?

This week, Pacific Century talks to General Kenneth Wilsbach, the commander of Pacific Air Forces.  General Wilsbach talks about the US Air Force’s role at the tip of the spear in the Indo-Pacific. A fighter pilot who has flown America’s most advanced jets, General Wilsbach discusses the Chinese air threat, North Korea’s nukes, the crucial alliance partners of the US, and the new technologies that will change aerial warfare.

This week, John Yoo, the Ricochet Podcast Senior Election Fraud Analyst and the Joan and Ray Kroc McRib Scholar at Hamburger University sits in for Peter Robinson and kicks the show off with a deep dive on where we stand with all of the current court cases and challenges around the election. Then, Avik Roy (listen to his American Wonk/COVID in 19 podcast right here on Ricochet) stops by to science us on the recent resurgence of COVID cases cropping up across the country. Then, National Review’s Jim Geraghty (do yourself a favor and subscribe to his must read Daily Jolt newsletter) visits for a bit to talk about Georgia, polling, and to drop a few impressions. Finally, mad props to Ricochet member @markcamp for winning the coveted Lileks Post of The Week badge for his tome, Was Perry Mason a Great TV Series? We’ll let you decide. Thanks to all who joined us for the live video version of the show. We apologize for Rob’s sweater.

Music from this week’s show: Don’t Look Back In Anger by Oasis

It’s out of the frying pan and into the fire, as professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo take us from the just-concluded drama of the Amy Coney Barrett hearings to the just-emerging drama over the Supreme Court’s role in the 2020 election. Along the way they consider how seriously we should take the court-packing threat; whether super-precedents are actually a thing; if Roe v. Wade and the ACA are actually in danger with a Justice Barrett on the court; and what the newest Supreme Court justice’s judicial blindspot is most likely to be. Then it’s on to the Supreme Court’s unpredictable role in the 2020 presidential election. Will Chief Justice Roberts surprise us all again? Do any of the lessons of Bush v. Gore apply this year? And does ACB have a duty to recuse herself? Come for the top-shelf legal analysis, stay for Professor Epstein posing a grammar brainteaser for the ages.

China expert and CSIS China Chair Jude Blanchette joins the Pacific Century to lay bare the political workings of the CCP.  Jude explains what the recent Fifth Plenum was and why it’s important for China’s long-term planning.  Jude also discusses the CCP’s state capitalism policy and dissects both the strengths and weaknesses of the Leninist state in a new era of competition with the United States.

Misha and John welcome an American hero to Pacific Century. Former Secretary of State and current Hoover Distinguished Fellow George Shultz discusses how China’s shrinking labor force will reduce productivity and economic growth. He also gives insights into his dealings with the Chinese during the Reagan Administration. Then, John and Misha discuss the rebirth of the “Quad” among the US, Japan, Australia, and India, and whether the Europeans can play any role in the Indo-Pacific.

An emergency meeting has been called in the faculty lounge as professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo react to the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, sharing their personal remembrances of the late justice and reflecting on her judicial legacy. Then, an analysis of what’s to come: Should the Senate steam ahead with confirmation (there’s a divide in the faculty lounge)? Which of the prospective nominees should President Trump choose? What are the odds that the GOP will once again find itself undermined by a justice who ‘evolves’ on the court? And how credible are Democratic threats of court-packing? All that and more in our comprehensive coverage of the biggest legal story of the year.

Misha and John discuss John’s new book, Defender-in-Chief: Donald Trump’s Fight for Presidential Power (St. Martin’s Press 2020). They discuss whether a Trump Doctrine exists and if so, what its core tenants are concerning the US and world power. Misha and John argue over whether Trump represents a sharp break in US foreign policy as well as what to expect concerning US relations with China in the coming years. Will the US/China relationship be the start of a new Cold War, a bump in the road, or something different?