Misha and John return after an extended sabbatical. They discuss the burning issue in Asia — the democracy protests in Hong Kong — with Jillian Melchior of the Wall Street Journal editorial page. After playing out the scenarios for how the Hong Kong protests end, Misha and John take up Misha’s recent article on the collapse of pork production in China and the political pressure of rising food prices on the Xi regime.

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It’s a lively session in the faculty lounge as professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo parse the case for impeachment, and analyze some of the biggest cases coming before the Supreme Court: will a new lineup of justices change the Court’s approach to abortion regulation? Will a ruling about the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau deal a blow to the administrative state? Are gay and transgendered employees protected by the 1964 Civil Rights Act?All that plus a detour into antiquities law, a (partial) endorsement of imperialism, a POTUS busted for speeding, and an answer to America’s most burning legal question: could the president literally shoot someone on Fifth Avenue and not pay a price?

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The men of Law Talk reconvene between their respective journeys to Greece and there’s a very full docket. On this episode: could President Trump’s conversations with Ukraine lay the predicate for impeachment? What’s the proper role for the U.S. in the Iran-Saudi Arabia conflict? Is the FDA within its rights to crack down on vaping? Should California be able to go its own way on regulating automobile emissions? Can the president solve West Coast homelessness? And why has New Mexico made it a little more dangerous to get married?

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Once a year we throw open the doors of the faculty lounge and let the Law Talk audience ask questions of Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo. This year’s result: a conversation that touches on everything from acquiring Greenland to whether John Adams was a constitutional scofflaw, from whether federal courts have gotten too trigger happy with injunctions to which foods make the professors wretch. Most importantly: which class did Richard struggle with in law school? The answer will … not surprise you at all.

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Xi Jinping is usually touted as the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao Zedong. How has he pulled power into his hands, and is there a reaction to his strength? Richard McGregor discusses this, as well as looks back at his popular book The Party, ten years after its publication. Meanwhile, Japan and South Korea are falling into a trade war; is it about economics or the poor political relations between the two? How low will relations between America’s two closest allies sink?

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It’s summer and when people go on vacation, we like to mix things up a bit, with James off this week, we called on our friend and fellow podcaster John Yoo to sit in. That was a fortuitous choice as our guest is Mollie Hemingway, former Ricochet editor, Fox News contributor, and co-author the the best selling book  Justice on Trial: The Kavanaugh Confirmation and the Future of the Supreme Court. We get the inside dope (yes, that’s the word) on Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearing and the aftermath and lasting effects. Also, was Ronald Reagan a racist? And is Baltimore really that bad? We ask native son Rob Long for an answer.

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Hoover Institution fellows Misha Auslin and John Yoo interview John Pomfret, the former Washington Post and Associated Press reporter in China. Pomfret discusses his response to an open letter in the Washington Post, signed by dozens of leading US foreign policy and China scholars, criticizing the Trump administration for making China “an enemy.” He explains “why the United States doesn’t need to return to a gentler China policy.”

 

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Presidents Trump and Xi meet at the G-20 meetings in Osaka and decide to restart trade negotiations, and then President Trump took a remarkable step across the DMZ into North Korean territory. Misha and John address these developments, and also the massive Hong Kong protests, trade developments, and divisions within the US foreign policy community.

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It’s time for summer school in the faculty lounge and Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo are reviewing the Supreme Court term that was. On this episode: was the census ruling a backdoor victory for critics of the administrative state? Are critics right that Alex Acosta should have done more to prosecute Jeffrey Epstein? John gives us one weird trick for determining when religious symbols are allowed on government property. And the professors weigh in on the legal repercussions of renegade ice cream licking. All that plus Epstein’s tips for how to defraud grocery stores, Yoo condemns a legendary American political figure to eternal damnation, and we get a faculty lounge review of Maine’s state soft drink.

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Hoover Institution fellows Misha Auslin and John Yoo welcome one of Britain’s leading experts on China to the podcast: Rana Mitter, Professor of the History and Politics of Modern China, St. Cross College, Oxford University, and the Director of Oxford’s China Centre. Professor Mitter is the author of Forgotten Ally: China’s War with Japan, 1937-45, and A Bitter Revolution: China’s Struggle with the Modern World.

Professor Mitter discusses the student-led demonstrations of the Tiananmen Square Massacre thirty years later and the 100th Anniversary of the May Fourth Movement. We then turn to the changes in China since Tiananmen and the future of Chinese pluralism after the coming to power of Xi Jinping.

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It’s a lively session in the faculty lounge as Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo navigate a minefield of legal controversies: what do Alabama’s new restrictions on abortion mean for the future of Roe v. Wade? What’s the proper libertarian position on compulsory vaccinations? Does Congress have a leg to stand on in its pursuit of Bill Barr? Was Harvard wrong to turn its back on a professor who’s defending Harvey Weinstein? And then, the professors finally answer the question you’ve waited years for: are bans on toplessness unconstitutional? We guarantee you’ll leave disturbed.

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Hoover Institution fellows Misha and John have a special treat today: they are joined by another Hoover fellow, H.R. McMaster, retired general, scholar, and President Trump’s former national security advisor. They discuss the rise of China, America’s response, trade, and what keeps the Chinese leadership up at night. Misha and John then turn to a discussion of US-China trade tensions, the new Japanese emperor, and the centennial of the May 4th uprising in China.

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The faculty lounge has reopened and Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo are colluding to bring you top-shelf legal analysis. On this installment: is the Mueller Report vindication of President Trump or the predicate for impeachment? Can the White House resist congressional subpoenas? Can congressional Democrats (or a wily coalition of state governments) force the president to release his tax returns? Will the Supreme Court break new ground on gay and trans discrimination? And is chalking tires unconstitutional?

All that plus our annual World Series picks and an especially heated debate on … free parking.

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As China tests Japan and Taiwan with air and naval challenges, Hoover Institution fellows Michael Auslin and John Yoo discuss why Japan and Taiwan play important roles in the United States’ Pacific strategy, and what measures the Trump administration can take to help their defense/military. They share their thoughts on why Taiwan is worth protecting, and conclude with a few words on the recent Thai elections.

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Historian Niall Ferguson joins Michael Auslin to discuss whether the United States is entering a new Cold War with China. Ferguson explains the quick change in public and government attitudes toward China and steps that the Trump administration is taking toward Chinese economic and military aggressiveness. Hoover fellows John Yoo and Auslin then discuss the pros and cons of the Cold War analogy, or whether the rise of Germany before WWI is the better comparison.

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It’s March Madness in the faculty lounge — and with the current news cycle, this episode is a layup line for Professors Epstein and Yoo. On the agenda: a deep dive into the Mueller Report; a look at the legal ramifications of the college admissions scandal; and a discussion of the Jussie Smollett controversy (one of the profs has a disturbingly deep grasp of the details). Plus, Epstein proposes a deal with the Russians, Yoo takes millennials down a peg, and Senik deals out some Jerry Springer trivia.

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Hoover Institution fellows Michael Auslin and John Yoo discuss two major developments in Asia. First, they explain why the “failure” of the Hanoi summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un wasn’t a failure at all. They then dissect the details of a proposed trade deal between the United States and China, asking whether policymakers miss the boat when they focus on tariffs and trade deficits instead of the theft of American inventions.

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Hoover Institution fellows Michael Auslin and John Yoo start their inaugural podcast on China, Asia, and the Pacific Century by discussing the upcoming summit between President Trump and North Korean President Kim Jong-un, trade tensions between the United States and China, the Justice Department’s indictment of Huawei, and Chinese arrest and trials of westerners.

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The newest installment of Law Talk sees debate brewing in the faculty lounge as Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo find themselves on the opposite side of several issues. On the agenda: Did Michael Cohen’s testimony change anything about the case against Trump? Can the president’s emergency measures to build a border wall stand up in court? Does the Supreme Court’s blow against civil asset forfeiture actually represent a constitutional error? And is a group of states about to take down the electoral college?

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On the first Law Talk of 2019, Professors Richard Epstein and John Yoo are tackling the big issues: can President Trump build a border wall by declaring a national emergency? Was the FBI within its rights to open an investigation of the president after the Comey firing? What happens when a Supreme Court justice stops showing up for work? Plus a look at backstage Law Talk drama, a State of the Union history lesson, and the professors quibble over the proper way to manage a Burger King. Yes, really.

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