Jack brings on Citizens’ Climate Lobby Conservative Fellow Nate Hochman to hear out Nate’s case for a conservative climate change agenda.

If young conservatives are our future, should we sell our bonds? Former Cornell University College Republicans president and current National Review ISI Fellow talks about campus conservatism and assesses the current debate about the future of the right, particularly as it pertains to young people.

Does the cancellation of 18th-century philosopher David Hume portend ill for the future of Western civilization? Jack brings his National Review colleague Daniel Tenreiro on to discuss.

Jack brings back his now-colleague Madeleine Kearns to discuss Harry Potter and the increasingly un-woke status of the books’ author, J.K. Rowling (increasingly, to the left, She-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named).

Ignoring the Democratic National Convention — like everyone else is anyway — Jack invites his National Review colleague Jimmy Quinn to explain what TikTok is and why it’s worrisome, and to ponder the extent of Chinese Communist Party influence on American college campuses.

Anders Hagstrom returns to the show to discuss the Big Tech menace (?), the Tik Tok menace (!), and the pleasures of video games (?!?).

On his 27th birthday, Jack flies solo with a raw, unedited podcast–recorded and released almost instantly–and answers listener questions on topics from sci-fi to Straussianism while also complaining that Ringo Starr won’t retweet him even though they share a birthday.

Jack brings back veteran young American — no, this is not a paradox — Nic Rowan, now at the Washington Examiner, to discuss the controversy over Washington, D.C.’s Emancipation Memorial.

Opening and closing samples “A More Perfect Union” by Titus Andronicus.

Jack asks the inconveniently older-than-30 Arthur Brooks to offer some life lessons for young people, current college students, and recent college graduates.

In yet another Young Americans first, Jack speaks to a non-American guest calling from another country: Oscar Holmstrom, his Boston Marathon finish-line friend and a young medical professional from Finland. They discuss the wonders of Oscar’s homeland, and how it has been dealing with coronavirus.

Jack brings back his friend and fellow runner Brady Holmer, a PhD student studying cardiovascular physiology at the University of Florida, to talk about running and to argue whether bodily immortality would be a good thing.

In another podcast first, Jack brings on a politician: Mike Gallagher, House Representative for Wisconsin’s 8th District. Though he’s over 30, he’s still a Millennial, and offers some pop culture discussion, some political perspectives, and some advice for young people.

In a Ricochet semi-crossover, Jack brings on un-Young American Craig Hanks, host of the Legendarium Podcast, who makes the case that sci-fi and fantasy literature is not just for kids.

In a special episode recorded from his parents’ basement, Jack invites R Street Fellow, “senator,” and sloth enthusiast Shoshana Weissman to discuss why she loves sloths, why she’s passionate about occupational license reform, and why SpongeBob is so great.

In a strange time, Jack does something new: Discuss sports! ChatSports Analyst Tom Downey joins Young Americans to discuss how he got into sports journalism, and how coronavirus is affecting both college and professional sports.

Do Millennials love Parasite? Do Millennials love Bernie Sanders? Is there an overlapping fan base? Jack invites Free Beacon War Room Director Paul Crookston onto the show to answer these and other questions. (He also confesses to eating an entire pizza when he should have just eaten half.)

Valentine’s Day was Friday, but this episode still talks about what it’s like to date in D.C., a place where newly employed and recently relocated host Jack no longer lives, though his guest Madeline Fry of the Washington Examiner does.

In a special crossover episode, Jack turns the last episode of The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg on which he appears in sidekick capacity into an episode of Young Americans. He spends it quizzing Jonah about things he has been meaning to ask him for a long time. Drugs, alcohol, punching people and getting punched by people are all discussed.

What do young liberals think of the Democratic presidential candidates? How did a Cincinnati restaurant employee end up as a D.C. reporter? Does anyone trust Pete Buttigieg (who’s over 30, by the way)? Jack invites Timmy Broderick, his friend of many years and now a reporter at the Christian Science Monitor, to discuss what Timmy’s young liberal friends think of the Democratic field (aside from not trusting Buttigieg), and what drove them to leave their mutual hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio and come to Washington in the first place.

Robby Soave, senior editor at Reason magazine, author of 2019’s Panic Attack: Young Radicals in the Age of Trump, and someone who is (just) over 30, (finally) joins Young Americans to discuss whether the political activism of young people today, especially on campus, is uniquely dangerous and poised to spill out into the culture as a whole. (Also, some LOST references sneak in.)