After a momentous term at the Supreme Court, what are we to make of it all? Josh Blackman, associate professor of law at the South Texas College of Law Houston, joins David and Sarah to help us all understand:  Roberts’ role at the center of the Court, Gorsuch and textualism, and Kagan’s growing influence. David, Sarah, and Josh cover it all.

Show Notes:

With Joe Biden’s popularity rising in battleground states (according to several recent polls), Democratic lobbyists and party officials are urging the presidential candidate to try and win over purple and even conservative-leaning states like Georgia and Texas. But most of his advisors are urging a more conservative path, encouraging him to focus on states he knows he can win. David and Sarah discuss these opposing strategies and offer their insights on what a winning 2020 presidential campaign should keep in mind.

In today’s episode, they also discuss the president’s pardoning power, theological and constitutional arguments related to the death penalty, and Trump’s tweet about re-examining the tax-exempt status of academic institutions that “are about Radical Left Indoctrination, not Education.” They wrap the podcast by responding to a listener’s question about what to include in an intro philosophy course.

The Supreme Court wrapped up its term today with an opinion on what counts as American Indian tribal lands and two related cases about the president’s financial records.

In Gorsuch’s majority opinion in McGirt v. Oklahoma, the court found that Congress’ 19th century promise to give large swaths of Eastern Oklahoma to the Muscogee (Creek) tribe still stands. This means roughly half of Oklahoma—and most of Tulsa—is now an Indian reservation, and that tribal members are not subject to Oklahoma criminal law when they are on tribal lands.

The Supreme Court has released two more religious liberty rulings into the world. Our Lady of Guadalupe School v. Morrissey Berru ended up being a blow to employment discrimination laws in favor of First Amendment religious liberty concerns. In Little Sisters of the Poor, the Court upheld a regulation allowing employers with religious objections to ignore the Affordable Care Act’s birth control mandate.

David and Sarah take a closer look at both cases, and on the battle between religious liberty and gay rights, David shares his theory on the emerging pattern from the Supreme Court.

As we near the end of another Supreme Court term, speculation abounds over a Court retirement. Would the resulting nomination battle be more or less contentious than the appointment of Justice Kavanaugh? David and Sarah answer this thought experiment while also touching on the implications this scenario would have on the 2020 election. They also break down rulings on robocalls and faithless electors.

When and how can you constitutionally defend yourself? The question comes after a gun-toting St. Louis couple made a show of force against Black Lives Matter protesters. On a more lighthearted note, David concludes the podcast by interviewing Sarah on her career path and what landed her at The Dispatch.

The Supreme Court denies cert to an abortion case, grants cert to a case over Mueller’s secret evidence, and the Biden and Trump campaigns are lawyering up for 2020’s final act. David and Sarah have thoughts.

Show Notes:

Espinoza is finally here, and David and Sarah are here for a proper deep dive into the Supreme Court’s decision. Plus their reflections on the legal and political implications of the court’s June Medical ruling.

Show Notes:

David and Sarah discuss another big day at the Supreme Court, from the court’s decision to strike down a Louisiana abortion law to its ruling on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Show Notes:

David and Sarah discuss Joe Biden’s polling lead in six swing states, the latest development in the Michael Flynn case, the Supreme Court ruling on asylum seekers, and free speech online.

David and Sarah discuss the president’s rally in Tulsa, the firing of the U.S. attorney in New York, the lawsuit over John Bolton’s book, and they process last week’s Supreme Court decisions.

 

David and Sarah discuss the Supreme Court’s ruling that blocks the Trump administration from ending DACA for now, return to their discussion over the Title VII ruling, and finish with the legal fight over John Bolton’s book.

 

The Supreme Court declined to take up new cases dealing with gun rights and qualified immunity. The court ruled that federal anti-discrimination laws protect gay and transgender employees. Lines are drawn on originalism vs. textualism. David and Sarah have thoughts.

 

It’s Brisket Eve and David and Sarah are celebrating by diving into the latest polls on the protests around the country, the legal weeds of Confederate monuments, and answer the question, why does the rule against perpetuities get the people going? But the festivities don’t end there, there’s the Michael Flynn amicus curiae, Tom Cotton, and Gone with the Wind.

 

David and Sarah discuss calls by protesters to “defund the police,” ideas to reform police departments from no-knock raids to police unions, incorporation doctrine, and the miniseries ‘Waco.’

 

David and Sarah discuss the stunning critique of the president from James Mattis, the events of the last 24 hours from Mark Esper breaking with the president to Tom Cotton’s op-ed, they then breakdown the charges against the police officer who had his knee on the neck of George Floyd, and end with their thoughts on ‘The Last Dance.’

 

David and Sarah discuss the latest news out of the Supreme Court including the court denying a California church’s lockdown challenge, Rep. Justin Amash’s plan to introduce legislation to end qualified immunity for police officers, Sen. Tom Cotton’s call to invoke the Insurrection Act, the president’s call to label ANTIFA a terrorist organization, and a return to their debate over law school.

 

The president has a new social media executive order. What happens if Trump loses in November, but doesn’t want to leave? Qualified immunity and the Fourth Amendment in the context of the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. House of Representatives allows proxy voting for the first time this week. And a Central Park video sparks a national conversation. David and Sarah have thoughts.

David and Sarah discuss the growing partisan divide over the handling of the coronavirus pandemic, the legal fights over church openings, Rachel Maddow’s SLAPP lawsuit victory, and the pros and cons of going to law school.

 

David and Sarah finish their preview of a number of upcoming Supreme Court decisions from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to DACA and the Title VII cases. The two also discuss the debate over moves to expand vote by mail, and the new Hulu miniseries Mrs. America.

 

David and Sarah discuss the end of Rep. Justin Amash’s short-lived presidential bid, preview a number of upcoming Supreme Court decisions from Little Sisters of the Poor to the Blaine Amendment case, and the New York Times column taking a closer look at Ronan Farrow.