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Summary

A panel discussion was held and sponsored jointly by the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) and the Hungarian Migration Research Institute (MRI), which examined the challenges posed by the Ukrainian refugee crisis. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine unleashed a deluge of refugees on Europe comparable in size only to the massive displacement of people at the end of World War II. Front-line countries in Europe – Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Moldova, and Romania – opened their borders to those fleeing Ukraine, and the EU in an historic decision offered them temporary protection, including the right to work. The United States has focused on helping Ukrainians where they are in Europe, pledging up to $5 billion in humanitarian assistance. In addition, however, the Biden administration has pledged to take in 100,000 Ukrainians, granted Temporary Protected Status to those already in the U.S., and created the “Unity for Ukraine” program to allow individuals to sponsor Ukrainians who don’t want to stay in the EU.

Summary

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a joint panel discussion with the Hungarian Migration Research Institute, examining international asylum law, its application in both Europe and the United States, and its impact on national sovereignty. With the Russia-Ukraine conflict raging and with millions of refugees potentially fleeing Ukraine, it is the perfect time for serious analysis and conversation about current policies that indiscriminately provide benefits to all border-crossing strangers versus more-targeted policies that would be more consistent with the spirit of the original international refugee agreements.

Mark Krikorian, the Center’s executive director and host of Parsing Immigration Policy, moderates a rebroadcast of the Center’s recent panel. Scholars from the Center and MRI examine immigration laws and policies that are being swallowed by the asylum exception and provide solutions to “The Hijacking of Asylum.”

Summary

More than a million migrants entered Europe in 2015 triggering changes in national immigration policies and in public support for the securing of border and the limiting of migration. Fast forward six years, the United States has just set an all-time annual record for the number of illegal migrants apprehended at the Southwest border, with two migrant caravans presently en route. How similar were domestic reactions to the migrant surges? What can the U.S. learn from Europe, where many countries are building walls?

Inspired by a trip to the U.S. southern border, Kristof Gyorgy Veres, researcher at the Migration Research Institute in Budapest and visiting fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies, discusses the immigration challenges faced by the U.S. and Europe, the impact of increased numbers on public opinion, and various policies employed on both sides of the Atlantic. Veres highlights America’s effective Remain in Mexico Program (MPP), which was terminated by the Biden administration and has now been ordered restarted by the courts. The European Union and the United Kingdom are now considering similar policies, requiring asylum seekers to wait abroad while their claims are processed.