Greg Corombos of Radio America and Ian Tuttle of National Review cringe at a new report confirming that top officials at U.S. Central Command changed intelligence reports from their own analysts to paint a false, more optimistic picture of our fight against ISIS. They also laugh as Donald Trump, who hates losers and says only he can fix America, says he’ll be just fine if he loses in November. And they shred Hillary Clinton’s argument to Utah voters that she is and would be a champion of religious liberty for them.

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My fellow Catholics, I have a conundrum for you. There is plenty to applaud in this pop article on eucharistic adoration. But how many Christians wonder as I do about the meaning of their time with “the real presence” of Christ in the Eucharist?  Read More View Post

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“Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed.” These words of Jesus may suggest that Christianity is about faith and not about knowledge. But it’s not. The separation of belief and seeing, of faith and sight, in the New Testament is only a separation of one […]

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I love @andrewklavan but he’s wrong about this: He argues: Read More View Post

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I am amazed at the calisthenics that NeverTrumpers use to prevent saying what is obvious and what clearly forms in their minds but is stopped from exiting their mouths right at the end of the thought and the beginning of the sound that emanates (figuratively, since most people write their complicated sentences). I remember the […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America slam Hillary Clinton for continuing to brazenly lie about her email scandal and claim the FBI director called her public statements truthful when he refuted them under oath. They also shake their heads as Donald Trump insists on waging an unwinnable public relations battle with the parents of a fallen Muslim Marine. And they unload on pathetic “Republicans” like Richard Armitage, Hank Paulson and Brent Scowcroft for actively supporting Hillary Clinton.

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I had written a post back in April of this year that I was recently given the chance to speak about on a podcast. The post is titled: “Prayer Should Not Be An Afterthought (But Action Should Not Be Either)” Read More View Post

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Certain Difficulties Felt by Anglicans in Catholic Teaching, Volume 1, Lecture 8. The Social State of Catholic Countries No Prejudice to the Sanctity of the Church Read More View Post

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For those fellow Catholics and those that are interested, the French Bishops have called for a day of fasting to remember Fr. Jacques Hamel.  http://www.churchmilitant.com/news/article/french-announce-day-of-fasting-following-french-priests-death Read More View Post

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To kill a priest who is saying Mass is therefore an act of unique desecration. You do not need to be a believer to grasp this point. Enemies of the church have understood it since the beginning: an early pope, St Sixtus, was beheaded during Mass in 258 ad by agents of the Emperor Valerian. […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Vikings: The Most Religious Show on TV?

 

Earlier this week, Bishop Robert Barron wrote a short essay MV5BOTEzNzI3MDc0N15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMzk1MzA5NzE@._V1_about the History Channel’s drama series Vikings, arguing that it’s the most explicitly religious show he can remember watching. On this advice, my husband and I watched the first episode last night and our 14-year-old son was immediately sucked in. His parting words for the night were “Don’t watch it without me!” (The 19-year-old came home in the middle of it and, scandalized, asked why we were letting him watch Game of Thrones? Um, no dear.) From a spoiler-free portion of the bishop’s piece:

[E]veryone in Vikings is religious: the Northmen (and women) themselves, the English, the French, and visitors from distant lands. To be sure, they are religious in very different ways, but there is no one who does not take with utter seriousness a connection to a higher, spiritual realm. Moreover, their spirituality is not an abstraction, but rather is regularly embodied in ritual, prayer, procession, liturgy, and mystical experience. The ubiquity and intensity of faith in these various peoples and tribes calls to mind philosopher Charles Taylor’s observation that, prior to 1500 or so, it was practically unthinkable not to be religious. That God exists, that spiritual powers impinge upon the world, that we live on after we die, that a higher authority judges our deeds—all of this was simply the default of the overwhelming majority of the human race prior to very recent times in certain pockets of Western civilization. Taylor speaks of the “buffered self” that has come to dominate today. He means the identity that is closed in upon itself, oblivious to a transcendent dimension, committed unquestioningly to a naturalist or materialist view of reality. I must confess that it was enormously refreshing to watch a program in which every single self was unbuffered!

Greg Corombos of Radio America and David French of National Review enjoy the massive upheaval on the first day of the Democratic National Convention in the wake of the DNC email scandal. They also discuss the ISIS-inspired attack in France that killed an 84-year-old priest and consider whether ISIS is pursuing a strategy similar to the Palestinian Intifada. And they wonder what young Sanders supporters will do now that their hero has been defeated and discuss the recent phenomenon of politicians being seen as messiahs by their followers.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. What are the Questions Everyone Should Ask Themselves?

 

shutterstock_310072547I’m planning my school year, making out the calendar for the English 101 class I teach that begins on August 8. One of my favorite activities for Fridays is a brief “on the fly” essay over an important topic. Each year, I shake it up a bit and have the kids write about current events or have them do several essays on a single, broad topic.

This year, I’ve decided to pose eighteen Big Questions™. These are existential queries that any serious person should ask himself, as they help define who we are and frame our life experiences. Are people born good? Is there a just and loving God? Etc.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Libertarian, with Richard Epstein: “Religious Liberty and Anti-Discrimination”

 

Richard Epstein looks at a controversial judicial ruling in Mississippi limiting conscience protections for religious individuals on LGBT issues.

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During this election season I’ve heard more than ever the argument, “We’re electing a President, not a pastor.” Ours is a nation founded upon the idea of religious liberty; it is the duty of the President of the United States to defend the liberties of people of all faiths and those without any faith at […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Life With Meaning

 

No life lacks meaning. No person, however young, dies without touching and moving others. In the Jewish and Christian traditions, this is taught explicitly, with the idea of a soul having a mission to complete (roughly, the Jewish idea) or a Divine plan (broadly speaking, the Christian perspective).

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Religious Liberty Under Siege in Mississippi

 

Religious LibertyLast month, Judge Carlton W. Reeves of the Northern District of Mississippi handed down an extraordinarily misguided decision in Barber v. Bryant by issuing a preliminary injunction against House Bill 1523, Mississippi’s newly passed religious liberty law, just minutes before it was to go into effect. The court found that House Bill 1523 likely denied the plaintiffs—a diverse group of supporters of same-sex marriage—their rights under Fourteenth Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause, and, furthermore, established preferred religious beliefs, violating the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause. Phil Bryant, the governor of Mississippi, has filed papers in the Court of Appeals to dissolve that temporary injunction. State Attorney General Jim Hood has declined to join in that defense of the Mississippi law. As someone who gave some brief advice and encouragement to Mississippi’s appellate lawyers, I think that their motion should be granted, given the major points of principle that it raises.

To put matters in context, HB 1523 was the latest effort to provide explicit protection of religious liberty and moral conscience for those individuals who are opposed to same-sex marriage. At no point does the legislation limit the right of any person to participate in a same-sex marriage, which would be an obvious nonstarter given Obergefell v. Hodges, a highly dubious Supreme Court decision, which held that the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment guaranteed that right to all persons. House Bill 1523 does not seek to dislodge or compromise that decision. Indeed, it would have been dead on arrival if it had attempted any such maneuver. But as is often the case, no one quite understands the scope of a particular constitutional right until its correlative duties are accurately specified.