Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Sage Advice

 

“Endless, vertiginous self-examination leads not only to a sterile moral life, but to a stilted intellectual life. Yes, examine if you must. But do it with dispatch and modesty and then get on with it. The dictum for this age should not be that the unexamined life is not worth living, but rather that the un-lived life is not worth examining. So go out and live: Act and go and seek and do. Save the psychic impact report, the memoirs and the motives for later. There will be time enough.”

– Charles Krauthammer, The Point of It All, “Three Pieces of Sage Advice,” pg. 128.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Philosophy of Werewolves

 

One of these days, I keep telling myself, I will write the quintessential werewolf story.

There are quintessential tales for golems (Frankenstein) and vampires (Dracula) because those stories offer more than mere entertainment. They dig into the darker side of human nature not just for cheap scares but to make us reflect on pride, lust, and daring.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Some of you will be familiar, through previous posts, with the mess that is the Unitarian Universalist Denomination these days. This is a link to a Kindle book of three essays. I’m buying a whole bunch of copies (despite not having a Kindle to read it on!) to support the author, UU Minister Todd Eklof, […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Anatomy of Disruption

 

I’ve been doing some thinking recently about the life cycle of industries. “Industries” in this context means anything that you can make a living at. If you have an idea, a new idea, something that will genuinely change the world, what happens with it? It seems to follow the old adage about every political cause (probably because political causes qualify as industries in this regard.) Let’s take a walk through it:

It Begins as a Movement

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. God Thought for the Day

 

We live in kinship with the Holy Spirit, who comforts us and quietly guides us through our day. Christ’s sacrifice, and our faith in it, makes our kinship possible. In that kinship, our yoke is easy and our burden light. The trick is to carry the burden and in the same direction, for the same purposes, as the spirit. How to do that? Listening is required, but that is challenging due to the Lord’s soft and still voice.

Our load is also lightened by letting go of our painful past. We ask forgiveness, we give up on grievances done to us in past times. Christ accepts these things from us and releases us from carrying them – if we choose to do so. Its the ‘choosing’ God is patiently waiting for. A sort of surrender to pure goodness. A will to release your will of its burdens.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Is the Pope Catholic? Or, is he a Gaiaist?

 

It used to be that a witty way to say “yes” was to instead answer “Is the Pope Catholic?”. Funny stuff, because there was nothing more certain than that. But after Friday’s speech on global warming, I am really starting to wonder.

Global warming alarmism is a religion. It has a deity (Gaia); it has a shared collection of transcendental beliefs; it has an apocalyptic end-times story; and it has many fervent believers, converts, and adherents. It also has non-believers (skeptics) and heretics (deniers) that are condemned by the virtuous. “Don’t you believe in climate change?” is how they challenge outsiders.

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Member Post

 

Mark Hemingway is back to help Aaron break down the recent intramural Conservative debate between First Things and National Review, a debate that apparently everyone else wanted to have also More

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Member Post

 

Yesterday in the Catholic Church we celebrated the Solemnity of Pentecost, the great feast day whereby the Holy Spirit descended upon the Church. During the psalm, we sang, Lord, send out your Spirit, and renew the face of the earth. We sang the Sequence by starting, Veni, Sancte Spiritus – Come, Holy Spirit. And during […]

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Member Post

 

This week’s two-part episode features Power Line’s own Scott Johnson reporting on the verdict today in the Mohammed Noor case—the Minneapolis police officer who was convicted last month for murder in the shooting of Justine Damond. Then we shift focus dramatically, talking with Prof. Joshua Dunn of the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and […]

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Member Post

 

…or is it? So very many things are named miracles – birth, for example – that we have robbed the word of its’ power. (“Miracle Whip”??). Seems to me that if everything’s a miracle then nothing’s a miracle. My understanding of “miracle” goes beyond merely being something I can’t explain, beyond being something nobody can […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. How Liberal Was Liberalism

 

Every year, I have two encounters with John Locke. The first comes when I go to the American Political Science Association, where I try to understand the arguments of the hardcore political philosophers brought in by Claremont and Institute for Humane Studies, and so on. The second comes about a month later when I teach the Founding to a group of Freshmen at my university. A point I try to drive home to my students, and which, given the recent discussions regarding Sohrab Ahmari around here, is relevant to Ricochet, is that the world of 17th Century England, and especially the Civil War and the Glorious Revolution, doesn’t look much like the United States of today, and that properly understanding Locke and Montesquieu requires thinking in terms they would have known.

At APSA, there’s always a debate between the philosophers between three basic positions. Position one is the view that Locke is an individualist radical who intended to completely up-end society. However, given that he was writing in 1688, he couldn’t rightly say that, so the message is hidden in the text. This is the dominant Straussian position. Position 2 is the “Built Better than He Knew” position, which is similarly related to the same named position on the Founders held by, for example, Harry Jaffa. In this telling, Locke was trying to justify the Glorious Revolution, but he -and later Adam Smith -actually had found a better way to place civil government and civil society to produce a virtuous and free nation.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Dollar Almighty and a Crisis of Faith

 

This week an Inside Edition video interviewing Kenneth Copeland went viral as part of a disturbing investigation of televangelists living upscale lifestyles. Copeland, and others, are part of a movement from decades ago, preaching a prosperity “gospel,” offering false teachings, and thus, false promises, which have caused many followers heartache mentally, financially, and in their faith. 

We hear stories and jokes all of the time about the crazy cat lady that leaves the entirety of her estate to one of these ministries (see, this clip from the 1997 movie The Rainmaker). However, there is a scary truth to this example, in that the message is solely that prosperity is the only way to God, and if one is suffering, that means Satan is in charge.

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Member Post

 

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan deciding not to launch a GOP challenge to President Trump in 2020. They also examine Jim’s research into the staggering amount of corruption non-profit groups on the right are committing in the name of supposedly helping conservative candidates. Finally, […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Conscience and Reason: Sohrab Ahmari’s Conversion Story

 

I do not write a weekly review for any publication. Ahem. I don’t even read a book a week (who are you people and don’t you have responsibilities?!). But, this book I finished in under a week — couldn’t put it down: Sohrab Ahmari’s From Fire by Water: My Journey to the Catholic Faith.

I’m a little embarrassed to admit I’d never heard of Ahmari until I heard him interviewed on Andrew Klavan’s podcast last week. He seems to have written for every conservative outlet (and some not so conservative) and he names a slew of prominent conservatives and small-o orthodox Catholics I’m familiar with in the acknowledgments, so I’m not sure how I missed him up until now. But, I found his story very relatable, although mine is a much humbler, more hidden life than his. I’ve always felt that I was “imprinted” on the Holy Spirit at Baptism, like a duckling to its mother (I know, the Church teaches it’s the Holy Spirit who does the imprinting, but you know what I mean). That’s the conscience part of my return to the faith of my parents — the irresistible pull toward beauty, goodness, and truth.

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Member Post

 

It has been said that envy is the one sin to which no one readily confesses, but just how widespread that tendency can be is suggested in the old Danish proverb, “If envy were a fever, all the world would be ill.” The parson in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales laments it because it is so far-reaching—it […]

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Member Post

 

Joe Biden, Nancy Pelosi, and other politicians who publicly advocate for legal abortions and legislate abortions into effect are not Catholic. They claim to be Catholic. Even respectable Catholic reporters, like EWTN’s Raymond Arroyo, identify them as such during reports. But it’s not true. Even non-Catholics are familiar with the “cafeteria Catholics” label which, like […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

The wave of state abortion bans and heartbeat laws has left me thinking. I’m not going to place any bets on whether these laws are at all allowed to stand by the courts or not. I am about as pro-life as they come, and with good reason, for the odds are high enough that had […]

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Member Post

 

Remember Uncle Ted? Theodore McCarrick? Former cardinal of the Catholic Church and money man/glad hander for Pope Francis? If you don’t, he is the despicable homo-predator and poster boy for the sex abuse crisis in the USA. And other than being forced to live a life of prayer and penance, and relegated to the lay […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘You Are Wrong and Your God Is Wrong.’

 

“You are wrong and your God is wrong.” A statement that a committed Catholic, Christian, or Jew might hear in China, North Korea, or in any number of countries, but not in Canada, and not from a judge.

Mary Wagner may be known in Canada, and in the United States among pro-life advocates, but she is well known in Poland. Poland is under pressure from the EU to liberalize their abortion laws. Poland is also under pressure to repeal a mandatory retirement age for judges, a law that was written to remove judges that were hearing cases during the Soviet occupation of Poland. As one writer put it, Poland was not impressed with the old totalitarians, and they are not impressed with the new totalitarians. Mary Wagner has been honored with a postage stamp in Poland.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Practical Differences Between the Orthodox and Evangelicals

 
First Orthodox Cathedral built in Georgia in 1,000 years.

I am a Baptist and a missionary that was on the field for 14 years and I worked primarily in Georgia but other Orthodox countries as well. My experience with culturally Orthodox and faithful Orthodox believers are from these countries in descending order of interaction, Georgia, Russia, Romania, Ukraine, and America. I was inspired by this post from @heavywater on the conversion of the Bible Answers man to Orthodoxy. What I wanted to do here is to lay out the practical differences I found between not just the teaching of Orthodoxy and Evangelicals generally but how the teaching is put to work in the real world. I am a Baptist and I would be a Reformed Baptist, on the question of salvation, to lay down a theological marker.

I am not trying to win or even make an argument here, I am not interested in this post who better reflects the teaching in the Bible or the wishes of Christ, instead I want to lay out how the differences in the teachings of the two churches play out in the lives of people practicing the two faiths. I want to illuminate what motivates the conversions that move people from Orthodoxy to Evangelicalism and what often motivates the reverse. I intend to take a more bottom-up look at what happens here so instead of starting with theology and then working down to the people I am going to start with the people and work my way up to some insights on the theology.

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