Member Post

 

Folks are still hanging in there with masks. I think they genuinely like ’em, regardless of efficacy. I also think that many folks who like ’em also deplore the less-than-1000% level of belief in them, such as might darkly dwell in the hearts of other people who nevertheless wear them. The opposite of a masquerade […]

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Join Jim and Greg as as they discuss leftist riots in at least three American cities Thursday night. Will the Democrats finally admit this is a problem since these people claim to hate Biden too? They also sigh as President Biden not only rejoins the World Health Organization but does so without one demand for accountability or reform. And they react to MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace and former Obama official Ben Rhodes discussing how to “detox” speech they don’t like and even bar Republicans from stating opinions if they don’t accept the left’s version of the truth.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Begging Your Pardon

 

President TrumpPresident Trump, like almost all* presidents, exercised the constitutional power of the pardon. In his last hours in his first term of office, President Trump pardoned 73 people and commuted the sentences of another 70. Most of the cases involved drug offenses now treated less harshly, while some rang of government misconduct and ax grinding by the feds. Two rappers made headlines: Lil Wayne and Kodak Black. The former mayor of Detroit, Kwame Malik Kilpatrick, got a break from a very long sentence. No, President Trump did not pardon terrorists, like certain prior occupants of the office. Here is the official release (emphasis added), followed by linked official clemency records for all presidents since Nixon.

Statement from the Press Secretary Regarding Executive Grants of Clemency
LAW & JUSTICE | Issued on: January 20, 2021

President Donald J. Trump granted pardons to 73 individuals and commuted the sentences of an additional 70 individuals.

As the Biden administration officially begins, join Jim and Greg as they cheer the U.S. for declaring a Chinese genocide against the Uighurs on President Trump’s final day in office. They also groan as Biden plans an economic policy around issues like race, gender equality and climate change rather than traditional metrics. And they’re surprised to see Democrats predict a COVID relief bill being delayed until March, although given what’s likely to be in it, we’re in no hurry to see much of it become law.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Trial That Should Not Be

 

Last week, the House of Representatives voted to impeach Donald Trump for “incitement of insurrection,” stemming chiefly from his remarks before a large crowd near the White House on January 6. As I have previously written, serious questions still remain as to whether those charges are valid as a matter of fact and law. But assuming they are, the question is what comes next.

Press coverage is mostly limited to tactical and political issues. On the Democratic side, the chief concerns are the timing and form of the expected trial. Should Speaker Nancy Pelosi delay sending the article of impeachment to the Senate to give House leaders more time to gather evidence to strengthen their case? Or will that delay undercut the perceived public urgency of the trial? If there is an impeachment trial, will that slow down the Senate confirmations of top cabinet officials or the passage of Joe Biden’s legislative agenda? On the Republican side, the question arises of whether individual senators should break ranks with Trump and convict him, even if most Republican voters are as strongly opposed to conviction as Democratic voters are in favor of it.

In an important sense, these questions put the cart before the horse. First, we must ask whether the Senate even has the power to try this impeachment once the president is out of office. As a textual matter, the answer is no. There are two relevant provisions in the Constitution: Article I, Section 3, and Article II, Section 4. Article I, Section 3, gives the sole power of impeachment to the Senate. First, a simple declarative sentence provides that “When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside.” The key word is “the” as in “the President.” The word “the” is used instead of the word “a.” “The” has a definite reference to the president now sitting in office, which will be Joe Biden on January 20. Once Donald Trump is out of office, he cannot be tried under this provision.

Member Post

 

We have all read about the crimes at the Capitol on January 6th and the arrest of John Sullivan, whose exploits with his mysterious camera woman were well chronicled by themselves and others. That sidekick has now been identified as Jade Sacker, photo journalist for CNN and NPR. Some of the coverage I have seen […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Impeachment of a Former President is Unconstitutional

 

As pointed out by Senator Tom Cotton, impeachment and conviction of a former President is not allowed by the impeachment provisions of the Constitution which provide in so many words that upon a conviction in the Senate the President shall be removed from office.

That is pretty obvious, which of course means that the Democrats and the DemMedia will either ignore the point or ridicule the argument.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss what happens next with a deeply fractured Republican Party. They also fume as Capitol Police officials say they never got the FBI warning of violent threats at the Capitol on January 6. And they have some fun with people mistakenly thinking Chuck Norris was part of last week’s demonstrations in Washington.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the CDC loosening rules on who can get the coronavirus vaccines. They also wade into the big tech crackdown on President Trump, Parler, and others, and discuss what free speech is and is not. And they roll their eyes as the media are now on day three of Kamala Harris being upset with the photo used of her on the cover of Vogue.

Join Jim and Greg as they salute Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman for his quick thinking in leading the mob away from the U.S. Senate on Wednesday. They also discuss the growing support for a recall of California Gov. Gavin Newsom, as California fails some of the most basic functions of government. And they point out that for all the alleged urgency towards another impeachment, congressional leaders seem to be pretty patient.

Member Post

 

The reason the Ottoman language existed is that the Turkish language lacked, or was imagined to lack, a lot of words. Turkish is fine for steppe stuff, like horse and sky and summer and winter, and next-to-steppe stuff like water and snow and mountain and avalanche – all ancient-sounding monosyllables. But Turkish seemed short on […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the good news that the Pfizer vaccine successfully fights off the recently discovered coronavirus mutations. They also mourn the death of a U.S. Capitol Police officer and discuss the scrutiny the USCP will undergo after Wednesday’s riots and the chief’s resignation. Finally, they slam Joe Biden and Kamala Harris for immediately framing the police response as evidence of a race-based two-tiered justice system.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Other Ox Was Gored This Time

 

I don’t know why the elites of DC have their dresses over their heads about the violence in the capital yesterday. For months we’ve been seeing rioting, looting, vandalism, and violence in our cities, and the news media has downplayed it, characterized it as “mostly peaceful”, and acted as if the right to free speech extended to the right to riot and break the law to address political grievances. Clearly they’ve been communicating the message that violence is an acceptable means of protest. So why are they surprised by this?

Of course, it all just depends on whose ox is being gored. 

Jim and Greg offer their reactions to demonstrators flooding into the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday in protest of the Electoral Vote counting process. They also examine the president’s response and one good thing that happened in the wake of all the chaos.

Join Jim and Greg to help you through a tough day for conservatives. First, they cringe as it appears Democrats won both Senate races in Georgia because a lot of Republicans didn’t show up. They also discuss how a Chuck Schumer-led Senate means a rough two years are in store for conservatives. And despite a lot of anticipation for dramatic action at today’s Joint Session of Congress on the 2020 Electoral College vote, they explain why there’s not much Vice President Pence or any other Republicans can do to reverse the outcome.

Happy New Year! Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the government making the right choice to void a major penalty for distilleries that produced hand sanitizer to meet demand in the early months of the pandemic. They also discuss President Trump’s phone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, in which Trump said Georgia officials had not done enough to investigate voting irregularities and said he needed to find nearly 12,000 votes. And they have fun with the total lunacy of House Democrats removing gendered language and Rep. Emanuel Cleaver ending his open prayer of the new session by saying “Amen and A woman.”

Oh man, it’s media day in our year-end Three Martini Lunch awards and Jim and Greg are holding nothing back. Specifically, they look at the stories the mainstream media covered far too much, the ones they conveniently ignored because they didn’t fit their narrative, and what they saw as the best stories of 2020.