Immigrants and refugees are a net economic benefit to host countries like the United States. Research has consistently shown they help create jobs and add an important dynamism to our economy. This is the case even when there is initial investment on behalf of the state, through education, English classes or welfare. Immigrants pay more into the system than they get out.  For Christina Qi, who started a hedge fund at just 22, the welfare she was on in her early years in Utah after moving from China helped stabilize her youth and pave the way for her to attend MIT. She went on to co-found Domeyard, a quantitative trading firm, in 2013, among the longest running high-frequency trading hedge funds in the world, and was trading up to $7 billion dollars a day. In 2019, she founded Databento, an on-demand data platform for asset managers and quantitative analysts. Being an immigrant, Asian and a woman in the cutthroat, male-dominated world of Wall Street didn’t deter her. Nor did she forget those who helped get her to where she is today. As you’ll soon learn in this week’s JobMakers podcast.

Guest

Rob Long is in for Jim today. Rob and Greg react to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo doing exactly what Rob said he would do to distract from his many scandals. Then they’re glad to see President Biden’s poll numbers sinking on immigration policy. They also explain how Biden’s “infrastructure” bill appears to include a bunch of Green New Deal provisions, guts freedom to work. And they call out the left’s refusal to acknowledge basic biological reality when it comes to determining a person’s sex.

Join Jim and Greg as they react to former CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield believing that the COVID outbreak probably started with a lab leak in Wuhan. They also discuss Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey saying President Biden is obviously not taking the border crisis seriously when he appoints someone like Vice President Kamala Harris to focus on the problem. And they point out all the ways Biden is nothing more than an opportunistic hypocrite when he now agrees that the Senate filibuster is a “Jim Crow relic.”

Welcome to JobMakers, a new, weekly podcast, produced by Pioneer Institute and The Immigrant Learning Center. Host Denzil Mohammed explores the world of risk-taking immigrants, who create new products, services and jobs in New England and across the United States.

In the debut episode, Denzil talks with Herby Duverné, CEO at Windwalker Group, an award-winning small business with more than 25 years of experience in physical and cybersecurity solutions that protect and prepare companies through custom learning and training solutions. Herby shares his background as a Haitian immigrant, and some of the challenges of moving to America, working through college to support his family, and embarking on a career path. They discuss what inspired him to start his own business, how he prepared for success, lessons he has learned along the way, and how he gives back.

In today’s edition:

• Nancy Pelosi is trying to steal Rep. Marianette Miller-Meeks’ seat

Join Jim and Greg as they enjoy watching California Gov. Gavin Newsom admit there will likely be a tough recall campaign against him on the ballot soon.  They also hammer the Biden administration for refusing to allow border security personnel to speak to the media and demanding the press send all inquiries to Washington. And they unload on unserious Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse for alleging the FBI faked its investigation into Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Join Jim and Greg as they marvel at some Democrats conveniently worrying about our massive debt just one day after passing a bloated COVID relief bill totaling $1.9 trillion and eyeing an even more expensive bill in a couple of months. They also discuss the sixth allegation of sexual harassment against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and when state Democrats will move from muttering things about resignation to an actual impeachment effort. And they discuss the mess at the southern border thanks to Biden’s deportation moratorium and stated plans of a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants.

Since the beginning of the COVID pandemic, we’ve heard a lot about anti-Asian racism. From New York to San Francisco, there have been reports of slurs, taunts, and violence. Recently, several horrific attacks committed by young black men against the elderly have caught national attention.

Numerous Asian American activists and political leaders have blamed former President Trump, noting that his use of the terms “Kung Flu,” “China virus” or “Chinese virus” has led to the increase in racism and violence.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Loung Ung, a human-rights activist; the author of the bestselling books First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers, Lucky Child, and Lulu in the Sky; and a co-screenwriter of the 2017 Netflix Original Movie, First They Killed My Father. Ms. Ung shares her experiences living through genocide under Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge from 1975 to 1979, which resulted in the deaths of nearly a quarter of Cambodia’s population. Loung talks about the experience of working with Angelina Jolie on the film version of First They Killed My Father, and the role that documentaries like hers and the award-winning 1984 film, The Killing Fields, can play in portraying the human stories behind historic events. They explore Ms. Ung’s life in America, and the support she received from her secondary school teachers in Essex Junction, Vermont, her professors at St. Michael’s College, and from local and religious institutions. The episode concludes with a reading from Loung Ung’s memoir.

Stories of the Week: A new poll shows that nearly a third of parents may continue with remote learning after COVID. According to a new report, only one in six Indiana college students who study education actually join the teaching profession. How can we remove barriers to entry, especially among people of color?

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Just recently, there was a horrible accident near San Diego, CA, where an SUV crashed into a semi-truck carrying gravel.  That SUV was carrying 25 people.  Thirteen of them were killed.  The SUV was a Ford Expedition, which I believe should carry a maximum of 8-9 people.  The California Highway Patrol is being very cagey […]

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Immigration: Getting It Right

 

Earlier this year, the Biden administration issued a “Fact Sheet” on his proposed US Citizenship Act, a comprehensive plan to expand pathways to citizenship and otherwise modernize and liberalize this nation’s immigration system. It is very difficult to draw categorical conclusions about the many facets of immigration law. The passion on both sides of this issue suggests that finding a sensible middle position may be impossible. Even so, a measured and compromising approach is the best way forward on immigration reform, with its complex highways and byways.

One way to think about immigration reform is to compare the case for free and open immigration with the parallel case for free trade. Fierce opposition to free trade in part propelled Donald Trump to his 2016 presidential victory. Free trade did not take a central role in the 2020 election, in large part because candidate Biden offered a similar sentiment to bolster trade union support. This was not merely campaign talk. President Biden recently issued a protective “Buy American” statement, the objective of which is “to support manufacturers, businesses, and workers to ensure that our future is made in all of America by all of America’s workers.” A Biden executive order from January seeks to “use terms and conditions of federal financial assistance awards and federal procurements to maximize the use of goods, products, and materials produced in, and services offered in, the United States.”

But the effort to turn the United States inward on matters of economic activity will force superior foreign products to be substituted with inferior domestic ones, making domestic production less efficient. These inefficiencies will have far-reaching consequences: raising prices and lowering wages across the board, weakening American exports, and inducing other nations to take retaliatory measures, which will further contract world trade. Hopefully, the world economy can avoid a repeat of the implosion of international trade that followed the passage of the 1930 Smoot-Hawley tariff. But the political risk still remains.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, founder of the AHA Foundation, and author of the books Prey: Immigration, Islam, and the Erosion of Women’s Rights, Infidel: My Lifeand Nomad: From Islam to America – A Personal Journey Through the Clash of Civilizations. Ms. Hirsi Ali shares insights from her upbringing and early education in Somalia, Saudi Arabia, and Kenya, as well as her courageous immigration to the West, where she experienced an intellectual awakening that led to human rights activism and a seat in the Dutch Parliament. They discuss why all human rights and free speech advocates should be concerned about the rise and growing militancy of political correctness and “cancel culture” in the West, its impact on reasoned public debate, and what educators need to teach young people about the importance of open mindedness and the free exchange of ideas. Lastly, Ms. Hirsi Ali reviews the central theme of her latest book, Prey, which explores the long-term ramifications of mass migration from Islamic-majority countries on the rights of women in Europe, given the different value systems between these countries and the West, with its commitment to the rule of law, rights-centered constitutionalism, science, and religious liberty. She concludes with a reading from the book.

Stories of the Week: The Biden administration is ordering states to continue federally required standardized tests this year, though there is flexibility on the exam format and accountability standards. Is this an opportunity for innovation in student testing? All members of a San Francisco-area school board resigned after mocking parents at a virtual meeting that they didn’t realize was already being broadcast live. Was this an isolated incident or a window into their general outlook toward families?

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Hey, if nobody minds me tooting my own horn, I think I deserve a few kudos! Why? Because today I passed a milestone: I just go my first retweet on my humble little Twitter account! My account is “Martin Wornath” @Heart_of_Rohan, and I was retweeted by an account called “Immigrants News” @immigrants24.        […]

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The word “because” was not a preposition in the 1930s, and even if it had been, Peter Fleming was too well-bred to use it as such. Thus, shortly after he and Kini Maillart commenced their epic trek from Peking to Kashmir, and their traveling companions, an exiled Russian couple named the Smigunovs, were arrested and […]

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Feeding the Gulag?

 

The new Secretary of State has opined that the US should allow Hong Kong refugees from Beijing’s repression to come to the United States. It is my opinion that most of those refugees fleeing communist repression might just have a bias toward Liberty. Given what the new regime has planned for the freedom-lovers already here (total repression), might they just be inviting in their sworn enemies? Might they just be inviting in, people like the ones they have already defined as “domestic terrorists” and destined for the internal US gulag?

I am in favor of all Hong Kongers being offered asylum in the US as soon as possible, before the Communists prevent their leaving entirely. I would just hate to see them all subjected to exactly what they left Hong Kong to get away from.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome a federal judge striking down President Biden’s attempted 100-day moratorium on deportations. They also lay out the many reasons the Democrats’ push for D.C. statehood is a terrible idea. And they have plenty to say about the new push for people to wear two masks and China claiming anal swab COVID tests are more accurate.

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City Journal offers another of Heather MacDonald’s succinct, brilliant and grim descriptions of the gap between the accepted diagnosis for ails black America and…well, the unfortunate reality. Among other things, she lays out why there are so few blacks among the most educated and highest paid of American professionals, and her conclusions probably won’t surprise […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they discuss how the final debate was much more pleasant to watch and far more substantive than the first one. They also dissect Joe Biden’s many lies in the debate – from saying he never promised to ban fracking to suggesting that the Hunter Biden laptop story is just Russian disinformation to inexplicably contending no one lost their private health insurance plans because of Obamacare. And they appreciate many lefties revealing just how little they know about immigration policy by misunderstanding and mocking Trump’s reference to “coyotes” smuggling kids across the border.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the Abraham Accords and hope President Trump is right that several other Arab nations may soon normalize relations with Israel as well. They also discuss the claims of a possible Chinese whistleblower who claims she has evidence that COVID-19 came from a lab rather than a wet market and the Chinese Communist Party has been covering its tracks ever since. Jim explains why she ought to release whatever she has as soon as possible. And as the “experts” keep insisting states are totally prepared for massive mail-in voting, they groan as Michigan can’t even get the names in the presidential race right on the ballot.

Fighting to Stay

 

Just when you are ready to give up on Millennials as ignorant, selfish, and anarchistic snowflakes, along comes a story that gives you hope for the future. A young lady, Melody Yang, was a student at the university, Santa Clara, where I teach. I’ve only just become acquainted with her (I’m in the English Dept., she was in the B-school and taught herself computer science), but her story is so compelling that I had to share it.

Melody Yang is Taiwanese, here on an F1 student visa, and behaving like a true Silicon Valley entrepreneur taking control over her life and earning the right to stay here. She already has designed — as an undergraduate — a successful new product and earned a job at Apple (as you can imagine, not an easy task). Apple now is applying for her to stay as “an individual of extraordinary ability and achievement.” In other words, when many of American’s children seem to despise their country, this young lady is fighting to stay.