The Farcical “Green New Deal”

 

The dominant source of energy for the foreseeable future for both the United States and the world will be fossil fuels, chiefly in the form of oil, natural gas, and coal. Throughout the world, many groups will push hard for massive subsidies to wind and solar energy. Yet, that attempt, no matter how bold, will fail to shift the overall balance of energy production toward green sources. The fatal drawback of wind and solar is their lack of storability. Solar works when the sun shines. Wind works when breezes blow. Both often provide energy when it is not needed and fail to provide it when required. Any legal diktat that puts these renewable sources first will only produce a prolonged economic dislocation. Pie-in-the-sky proposals like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal, which stipulates 100 percent of energy needs be supplied by “clean, renewable, and zero emissions” sources, should be dead on arrival.

The major challenge of sound energy policy today is to find ways to make the production of fossil fuels both cheaper and safer. Fortunately, private-sector innovation has paid off handsomely such that the total social cost of fossil fuels has trended sharply downward and shows every indication of continuing to do so. The point is especially true with fracking, which has been driven by large cumulative improvements at every stage of the production process. Since 1950, carbon dioxide emissions have increased over fivefold, but, as policy analyst Marlo Lewis has demonstrated, it is difficult to link these emissions to any negative global consequences. After all, over the same period of time, there have been massive increases in life expectancy, crop yields, and wealth. In my view, the current scientific record offers no support for the claim that increases in CO2 emissions pose an immediate, let alone existential, threat. Indeed, global temperatures have declined 0.56 degrees Celsius between 2016 and 2018 for the largest two-year drop in the past century—a trend that has gone largely unremarked upon in the press.

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Quito, Mexico City, Laramie, and Cadmium

 

I could be a hypochondriac but my attention span, even when the attention is directed inward, is too short. Also, I’m too darn healthy. Wandering around Quito in late 2016, I had the idea I might find the altitude a strain, but I did not. In late 1982, I had had the same idea, and […]

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Climate Change Denialism and the Conservative Loss of the Skeptical High Ground

 

I posted a comment on this week’s Ricochet Podcast (Bjorn Lomborg was one of the guests) and someone suggested I turn it into a post. I think that’s a great idea, so here I go.

I am essentially as much of a Climate Change Denier as one can intelligently be. Yes, the Earth’s climate is always changing, slowly, for various reasons, and yes, perhaps it is changing slightly and slowly from human activity. But the current Consensus on Climate Change that is making predictions of what is going to happen to Earth’s Climate in the next 20-100 years, I believe, is radically wrong.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud the Washington Post for calling out California Sen. Kamala Harris for her absurd contention that smaller tax refunds mean you’re paying more in taxes. They also play the entire insane questioning of longtime foreign policy official Elliott Abrams by Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar and marvel at her ignorance of U.S. history and bizarre badgering of the witness. And they get a kick both out of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell planning a floor vote on the Green New Deal and bill sponsor Ed Markey fuming that Republicans are going to hold a vote on his legislation.

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A Green Modest Proposal

 

Although Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal has drawn the derision of all serious people, I for one want to voice my support for it.

There are many laudable aspects to this plan, such as eliminating air travel, for instance. Who doesn’t love the idea of shuttering the TSA, after all? Also: you won’t have to live with the dread of potentially being seated between two morbidly obese, putrescent rubes from flyover country clutching desperately to their emotional support ferrets. (Bernie already eliminated their choices in deodorant, you see.)

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America react to California Gov. Gavin Newsom greatly scaling back high-speed rail in the state, proving once again that the concept is not the dream solution that liberals think it is. They also slam New Jersey Sen. Bob Menendez for being outraged that people entering the U.S. illegally and illegal immigrants caught driving drunk are treated like criminals. And they have fun with New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker declaring that meat consumption is destroying the planet and that he wants to make the existing model of the food system obsolete.

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Today’s “But People Will Die!” moment.

 

Saw a couple of articles today that triggered my BS meter: Firstly: MSNBC anchor says “millions and millions and millions” of people will die due to climate change More

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Child’s Play: A Short Story

 

As AOC walked into the room, people were talking excitedly and laughing. They were anticipating the meeting that would begin in a few minutes. She waved at people, shook hands and smiled warmly. Slowly people drifted to their chairs and the chatter slipped into an electrified silence.

AOC stood at the front of the room, her hands folded in front of her, looked around the room and made eye contact with several people. They smiled back and nodded to acknowledge the gravity of the moment.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America blast Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam for suggesting that all of Virginia was as behind on race relations as he is and that only he can heal the divisions there because he’s a doctor. They also explain why Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar is morally and factually bankrupt for suggesting that the only reason many lawmakers support Israel is because they get money from the American Israel Public Affairs Committee. And they patiently try to tell 2020 presidential candidate and New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker that debating climate change is not the same as fighting the Nazis.

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Green, With Envy

 

An end to industrial civilization, but like in a totally pro-union way.

If this week’s Green New Deal boomlet was politically significant, it wasn’t just because a legislative newcomer elected by 110,318 voters in Queens and the Bronx proposed a government program to renovate or replace every building in the country within ten years, abolish internal-combustion-engine cars and commercial air travel, shut down all conventional utility generation without building nuclear, phase out flatulent cows, support persons “unwilling” to work, print new paper money to pay for it all, and on and on. New York City voters have elected radical mavericks to Congress before and will do so again.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are still shaking their heads over the political chaos in Virginia, but they are happy to see a weakened Gov. Ralph Northam give Republicans most of what they want on tax relief. They also point out some of the most insane provisions included in the Green New Deal, proving how out of touch the socialists in the Democratic Party really are. And they shudder as former KKK official David Duke endorses Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard for president because he thinks Gabbard is least likely to send troops to die on behalf of Israel in the Middle East. Gabbard has denounced Duke and rejected the endorsement.

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Hidden Costs of Renewable Fuels

 

I received an email from my alma mater, Brown University, which linked to this story:

A new Brown initiative with Constellation and Energy Development Partners will transform a former gravel pit in North Kingstown into Rhode Island’s highest-capacity contiguous solar generation project.

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The Latest Threat to the Planet: Paper Receipts

 

A California Assemblyman has introduced legislation that would ban paper receipts from being printed and given to customers unless the customer asked for a printed receipt. So I guess I’m behind the times. I thought California had an ongoing problem with wildfires and was staring down the barrel of a crippling pension problem. And had […]

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Happy New Year! Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are back and ready to tackle 2019. Today, they blast incoming Utah Sen. Mitt Romney for heading to the Washington Post and CNN to discuss his concerns about President Trump on the eve of being sworn in, although they share many of his concerns. They also sigh as Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren launches her presidential exploratory committee by whipping up accusations of class warfare. And they discuss the strategy of Washington Gov. Jay Inslee to run for president on the single issue of climate change.

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A Mental Health Day and a Long Hike

 

Yesterday I decided to take a respite from politics and other woes of the world. I went on a hike with my brother on the Lower Salmon River Trail on the slopes of Mount Hood. The River was high in the aftermath of a big Pacific storm that had just swept through dumping about three inches of rain.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America fume as President Trump says ISIS is defeated in Syria on Wednesday and Thursday he claims that Russia, Iran, and Syria can handle the fight. They’re also disgusted as Trump’s insistence on $5 billion for a border wall seems to be shifting and congressional Republicans appear to have no interest in this fight despite promising one just before the midterm elections. And they hold the door open for Sen. Jeff Flake to leave and never come back as the retiring Arizona lawmaker proposes a new carbon tax just days before leaving office.

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There’s a Cat, a Big Cat Loose in My Neighborhood

 

From Arizona Central: No mountain lion has ever reached retirement age. They usually live to be around 10 years old. In captivity, a rare few reach 20 years. One famous cat, affectionately named Scratch, died just short of his 30th birthday.  More

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