Greg and guest host Rob Long celebrate a federal court in Louisiana ending President Biden’s oil and gas lease ban on federal land. They also cringe as the Biden administration considers lifting sanctions on top Iranian institutions which finance terrorism. Lastly, they roll their eyes at California Gov. Gavin Newsom for failing to relinquish his state of emergency powers despite COVID-19 numbers being at all time lows in his state.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome Sen. Joe Manchin definitively opposing the Democrats’ sweeping elections bill and get a kick out of the left losing its mind over it. They also shudder as Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm publicly admits that ransomware hackers are capable of shutting down our power grids. And they laugh as CNN’s Brian Stelter starts his interview of White Press Secretary Jen Psaki with the softest of possible softball questions.

Environmental Extremists Don’t Believe Their Own Predictions

 

In public discourse, it’s considered bad form to insult your opponent’s integrity. But it’s almost impossible to believe that climate alarmists believe their own apocalyptic predictions.

Greta Thunberg, Al Gore, and other experts sternly warned that our planet will be an uninhabitable, unsalvageable oven unless within 15 years (now 10 or 12) we bend all human activity to the goal of eliminating carbon emissions. If true, this creates an obvious moral imperative.

So on his first day in office, President Biden terminated the extension of the Keystone pipeline, created to export shale oil from Alberta to the US. It was, uh, controversial.

This week on JobMakers, Guest Host Jo Napolitano talks with Jitka Borowick, Founder & CEO of Cleangreen, a cleaning service committed to environmentally-friendly practices, and Nove Yoga, launched during COVID. Jitka grew up under communism in the Czech Republic. Determined to learn English, she made her way to the U.S., initially with plans to stay for only one year – but ended up making it her home. In this episode, they discuss the difficulties of learning another language and culture, her pathway to entrepreneurship, and her courageous decision to open a new business during a pandemic. Jitka shares insights on how her companies have successfully adapted to the challenges so many small businesses have encountered over the past year.

Guest:

Join Jim and Greg as they dissect the Democrats’ push for a commission to investigate the Capitol riot on January 6 and point out that the 9/11 commission was not the success that Democrats are now pretending it was. They also groan at another report showing the biggest jump in inflation since 1992. And they get a kick out of a new book on the 2020 campaign pointing out the very particular conditions that Bernie Sanders insisted upon while on the road.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that Senate Democrats are running out of time – and don’t have the votes – to pass major priorities on the left. They also groan at actor John Cena’s nauseating apology to China, for simply referring to Taiwan as a country during an interview promoting his new movie. And they shake their heads as Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene likens a grocery store chain identifying employees who have been vaccinated to the Nazis forcing Jews to wear yellow stars.

Good News for the Day: Feral Cats at Work

 

I found this story on Fox News this morning, about a “team” of feral cats.  They live in Chicago, and are being managed by a group called “Treehouse Humane Society”.  The group gets the cats into good health, spays or neuters them, and provides them with shelter, food and water, and litter boxes.  It seems this program has been around since 2012, with the cats are released onto the streets as “pest control”.  The city has found that the presence of the cats helps keep the rat population down, even when they don’t kill and eat the rats.

This is sort of like the goats that are hired out to keep people’s lawns and fields free of weeds, although the goats aren’t rescue animals like the cats are.  The cats would otherwise have to be euthanized since most of them don’t make suitable indoor pets.  I just thought this story was heartwarming, and a great way to help both the kitties and the people of Chicago (who can use all the help they can get).

The American Jobs Plan has been touted by Vice President Kamala Harris as the biggest jobs investment since World War II. But how exactly will we pay for $2 trillion in new spending on infrastructure, green energy, housing, and education reform? Do the benefits of increased spending outweigh the proposal’s impact on deficits and tax rates?

Last week, Avik Roy held a panel discussion to dive in to the details with FREOPP scholars: Energy Scholar Robert Bryce, Health Care Scholar Gregg Girvan, Housing Scholar Roger Valdez, Education Scholar Dan Lips, Education Scholar Preston Cooper, and Financial Services Scholar Jon Hartley.

Hubwonk Host Joe Selvaggi talks with Emergency Preparedness expert Dr. Paul Biddinger about how experts plan for disasters, and what went right and wrong in this pandemic.

Guest:

Join Jim and Greg as give President Biden credit for correctly labeling the Ottoman slaughter of Armenians last century as a genocide, They also rip John Kerry for reportedly telling Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Zarif that Israel was responsible for more than 200 attacks against Iranian interests inside Syria. And they shake their heads as Vice President Harris seems unmotivated to solve the border crisis yet copies of her kids book are showing up at a migrant facility in California.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome House Republicans trying to force the Biden administration to keep the effective Trump-era sanctions on Iran. They also unload on Biden for his ridiculous, non-binding goal of curbing greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent by the end of the decade – and for his climate agenda that would really just grow government. And they have some fun with Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot suggesting police officers get permission from a supervisor before chasing criminals on foot.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they see some glimmers of good news for Putin critic Alexei Navalny but wonder how firm the Biden administration really plans to be when it comes to Russia. They also shudder as prices for fuel, food, and other goods, are clearly on the rise. And they call out Rep. Maxine Waters for suggesting anything less than a guilty verdict for murder in the Derek Chauvin case should result in more confrontation in the streets.

Rob Long is in for Jim today. Rob and Greg react to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo doing exactly what Rob said he would do to distract from his many scandals. Then they’re glad to see President Biden’s poll numbers sinking on immigration policy. They also explain how Biden’s “infrastructure” bill appears to include a bunch of Green New Deal provisions, guts freedom to work. And they call out the left’s refusal to acknowledge basic biological reality when it comes to determining a person’s sex.

The Reality of the Need for More Nuclear Energy Is Hard to Ignore

 

Shutting down nuclear power plants is a lot easier than generating reliable, carbon-free energy. As The New York Times reports on the tenth anniversary of the meltdown of three nuclear reactors in Fukushima, Japan, following a massive earthquake-tsunami: “As the share of nuclear energy in Japan has plummeted from about a third of total power to the single digits, the void has been filled in part by coal and natural gas, complicating a promise that the country made late last year to be carbon-neutral by 2050.”

Indeed, a member of the government’s advisory committee on energy policy said the nation’s goal of carbon neutrality by 2050 would be hard with nuclear — but, he was quoted by the Financial Times, “In my view, without nuclear it is close to impossible.” (So far just a fifth of the 50 shut-down reactors have been restarted.) In that same NYT piece, reporters Ben Dooley and Hisako Ueno tell the story of what’s been happening in Suttsu, an “ailing fishing town” on Japan’s northernmost major island of Hokkaido. There’s been a big pushback by residents — a firebomb was tossed at the mayor’s home — upset that the mayor agreed to volunteer the town for a government study on potential locations for spent nuclear fuel rods. No commitment, just a study.

Before Fukushima, the piece continues, resource-poor Japan had come to accept its need for nuclear power. That, despite its World War II history. Perhaps reality will be accepted once again given (a) no fatalities have ever been found to be directly attributable to radiation exposure from the Fukushima meltdown and (b) the reactor shut-downs have caused fatalities due to the national switch to dirtier and more expensive power generated by imported coal and oil. More of the rest of the world will also accept the need for a nuclear solution. More on that reality in a recent essay from the Breakthrough Institute’s Ted Nordhaus:

Host Joe Selvaggi talks with Chris Dempsey, Director of Transportation for Massachusetts, about road and mass transit innovations that could address traffic challenges in a high-growth, post-pandemic economy.

Guest:
Chris Dempsey is Director of Transportation for Massachusetts. He was formerly Assistant Secretary of Transportation for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In that role, he co-founded the MBTA’s open-data program, which was named Innovation of the Year by WTS-Massachusetts in 2010. Chris has also worked as a consultant at Bain & Co., on a number of local and statewide political campaigns including that of Congressman Joe Kennedy III, and at a transportation technology startup that provides mobile ticketing for transit systems in New York, Boston, and Los Angeles. Chris is a graduate of Pomona College (B.A., 2005) and Harvard Business School (M.B.A, 2012). Chris has taught transportation policy at the graduate level at Northeastern University. In 2015, Chris was named Bostonian of the Year by the Boston Globe Magazine for his volunteer work leading No Boston Olympics.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the failure of the Neera Tanden nomination for the Office of Management and Budget. They also welcome strong vaccination numbers in Texas, which makes Gov. Abbott’s decision to open the state 100 percent a pretty safe move. They also welcome the notion of allowing people to make their own decisions. And they cringe as the number of newborns in the U.S. after nine months of the pandemic were disturbingly low.

Deep (Freeze) in the Heart of Texas

 

The recent dramatic events in Texas are an early warning sign of the disasters that are likely to occur if the Biden administration continues its relentless effort to demonize the use of fossil fuels in the effort to combat climate change.

Assessing whether the climate is really changing requires looking at two numbers. The first is mean global temperatures across time. While that figure is increasing overall, it shows a complex up-down pattern that cannot be explained solely by the steady increase in carbon dioxide emissions. The higher the mean temperatures, the worse the supposed problem.

The second measure, though often neglected, is every bit as important: the variance in temperatures, whether measured in days, seasons, or years. A lower variance over a relevant time period means less stress on the power grid and other systems, even when the mean temperature increases. The general trend is that the variance in the temperature has gone down over time. Even today, for example, a large fraction of the record high temperatures in the United States took place in the 1930s—when carbon dioxide levels were far lower than they are today—with only three record highs after 2000.

Join Jim and Greg as they applaud Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis for speaking the truth that schools should be open and there’s only one reason why they aren’t. They also shake their heads as a brutal cold snap causes power system failures and rotating blackouts through Texas – and the lessons that should be learned. And they take a bite out of Bill Gates for wanting all “wealthy nations” to switch to synthetic beef.

 

‘The More Electric Vehicles We Build, the Worse CO2 Gets’

 

Even though Toyota Motor Company will soon start selling their own versions of electric cars, Akio Toyoda, president of the company, isn’t thrilled with the EV rage and had two important points to make about electric vehicles (EVs).

The first point is that EVs are too expensive for most people to afford. His company’s marketing model is based on affordable cars, so he knows what he’s talking about. He called EVs “a flower on a high summit” that would not penetrate the market much further than they already have. EVs sold now in the US depend heavily on government subsidies. Tesla and other EV stocks are grossly overpriced since their likely earnings will never catch up. He doesn’t see the price of EVs coming down much since cost-cutting technology has already reached its limit for the standard EV. It would seem he sees promises of an EV for $25,000 as being empty.