Member Post

 

Instead of canceling people and institutions on seemingly random and arbitrary bases, I propose a single set of actions to resolve both “canceling” of those responsible for “institutional racism” and providing reparations to its supposed victims. [This is applicable only in the United States.] The most prominent common factor in “institutional racism” in the United […]

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Rob Long is in for Jim again Thursday. Today, Rob and Greg applaud Seattle businesses for suing the city for failing to provide essential services while local politicians coddled the radicals in the CHAZ/CHOP area. They also react to revelations in Peter Strzok’s notes that Barack Obama and Joe Biden were in on the planning to target Michael Flynn and the Trump administration. And they unload on leftist radicals and their enablers as what supposedly started as an effort to rein in police brutality is now focused on tearing down a statue celebrating emancipation, destroying Mount Rushmore, and changing our national anthem.

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It’s all good news on Tuesday’s Three Martini Lunch! Join Jim and Greg as they cheer a new rule which no longer requires many nonprofits to disclose donors to the IRS. They also cheer retail sales from May more than doubling expectations and suggesting Americans are ready to buy again. And they cheer politicians in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn for defying New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and busting open locked playgrounds in response to the city’s heavy-handed crackdown on the Orthodox Jewish community over COVID restrictions.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Unexpected Job Losses

 

We have a basic unlimited car wash plan with a chain car wash. No, it isn’t A1A Car Wash, even though we’re in Albuquerque. It’s an automated car wash with an option to have interior work done. During the lockdown, they closed their locations and stopped charging the monthly fee. They would occasionally send me messages about plans they were working on to reopen safely. Sometime around May 10, they reopened for exterior service only.

In the Before Time, there were maybe 15 people working a shift. Cashiers for the interior and exterior lanes, four to six people working the interior cleaning, a person on the entry of the wash, two people wiping cars as they exit the wash, two or three doing interior cleaning on exit, and I’m sure a shift manager somewhere. Now there are maybe three or four people working. One cashier, since only the exterior lane is open; one at the entrance to the wash; one at the exit probably watching so the wash doesn’t have an issue; and probably a shift manager.

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Join Jim and Greg as they enjoy watching former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper blame his ethics problems on “dark money” Republicans after an independent commission found him guilty of improperly accepting gifts while in office. But will it really damage his bid for U.S. Senate? They also shake their heads as Washington Gov. Jay Inslee pretends not to know a group of radicals is claiming several square blocks in Seattle as ” an “autonomous state” that is separate from the United States. And as the cancel culture claims the TV shows “COPS” and “Live: PD,” they fire back at the unhinged push against the Nickelodeon cartoon “Paw Patrol.”

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Liquidating the ‘Hood

 

Stranded assets are the beached whales of capitalism. Capital invested in what looked like a good long term bet, that has now turned into an illiquid headache due to a change of circumstances. This term is often used in the context of regulation and environmentalism, but assets can become stranded in other ways:

If you keep even half an eye on the investing scene, you know that commercial real estate in general, and retail in particular, has been in trouble for some time. The advance of online shopping and networked business in general has been relentless and deadly. ‘Category killer’ store fronts and department stores alike have fallen to bankruptcy and reorganization, shopping malls have lost their anchor tenants, gone under and been rebuilt into everything from housing to entertainment centers. And that was before COVID, and before looters and arsonists showed up at the door.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. New Small Aircraft Takes Flight

 

Cessna has designed a new aircraft. The Cessna 408 SkyCourier, I believe, is the largest aircraft that Cessna has made. It’ll carry up to 19 passengers or three tons of cargo for 460 miles at 230 mph. Powered by twin turbo prop engines, it’s almost the exact opposite of any plane that Boeing makes. A high wing design, it’s far smaller, short-range and cheap — around $5.5 million each. For a commercial plane, that’s a bargain. Its first flight was just a few weeks ago, on May 17, it has yet to receive FAA certification, but is expected to enter service next year.

FedEx has signed on to take the first 50 — with options on 50 more.

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Join Jim and Greg as they cheer a May jobs report that was more than 10 million jobs better than the experts predicted. They also groan as the New York Times leadership continues to grovel to its millennial and Gen Z staffers who remain traumatized that an opinion column they don’t agree with ended up in the paper. And they use pop culture and common sense to explain why the plans of some Minneapolis City Council members to “dismantle” the police are insane and counterproductive.

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Member Post

 

Take this, capitalism-hating anarchists out to burn it all down. I am not a bit surprised to discover many Americans are made of sterner stuff than expected and got busy getting on with it. @EamonJavers 5:32 AM · Jun 5, 2020 Whoa – payrolls rose 2.5 million in May. That is a huge beat, and […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they reflect on Iowa Rep. Steve King losing his GOP primary and Valerie Plame going up in political flames in her congressional bid in New Mexico. With politicians cracking down on everyday social distance violators but encouraging the demonstrators to take to the streets in close quarters, just how much of our stay-at-home orders was politics and how much was about public health? And they welcome the World Health Organization close to reality as reports suggest it knew about China’s lies and stalling tactics in the critical early days of the pandemic.

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Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer Healthcare Senior Fellow Josh Archambault are joined by Hoover Institution’s Dr. Lanhee Chen to discuss the role that the World Health Organization (WHO) plays, what dysfunction may have contributed to the scale of the COVID-19 pandemic, and what steps can be taken to bring back transparency and trust.

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Join Jim and Greg as they marvel at the SpaceX launch, celebrate the plummeting COVID-19 numbers in Italy, and unload on destructive rioters and feeble “leaders” as dozens of American cities descend into chaos.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Unwind from China? Can It Be Done?

 

This is a subject that has come up first in the comments with the @jameslileks post “Watching the CCP Press,” and which @iWe explored further by asking “whether one would trade with Nazi Germany.” We need additional information, indeed hard data, to even begin to look at the practicalities. Some here have mandated that we somehow absolutely cease trade with China. Others (and indeed most, I should think) would argue that an absolute embargo is both undesirable, and indeed impossible in any situation short of open warfare, but that we should certainly reevaluate what we are trading with China, and how we are doing so.

But to even have that discussion we need to know something of the extent of what we buy from China (and really, from everywhere else too), and how that really affects us, otherwise, should the absolutists be granted their immediate wish and all trade cease, the results may be distinctly unpleasant. I own and run a company that manufactures electronics, and so, at least as far as electronics go, I do have rather a lot of insight into what exactly comes out of China, and whether alternatives exist. I have done a Country of Origin query on the bills of materials (BOMs) for a couple of my products, and will detail those below, and what the implications are.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Are Cities Over? It’s Time for Some Skepticism About That Idea

 

I recently did an AEI online event on the future of the American city in the age of pandemics. As a recent Financial Times piece put it: “Almost overnight, cities have gone from being places of dreams and ambition to fearful symbols of mortality. The rich have retreated to the countryside, just as they did in Europe during the Black Death. Until now, cities have always bounced back.”

But will cities rebound this time? That was the first question I asked my esteemed panel. And here is some of what they told me:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Report from the Heartland: Holiday Weekend Edition

 

We have friends who own a place on a lake near Hot Springs, Arkansas who invited us up for the weekend, so we went! Hot Springs is a tourist town with a horse racing track, a casino, several lakes, and historical bathhouses. Of course, the bathhouses were closed. Restaurants were recently allowed to re-open and operate at 33% capacity. Retail finally opened back up around the first of May. My friends reported that the casino closed in March, but the horses kept racing, to an empty grandstand, until the season culminated with the Arkansas Derby on the first Saturday in May. Apparently, with online betting, the family-owned racetrack did just fine, despite the lack of free-spending spectators on site.

The action appeared to be out on the lakes: Boats everywhere! Families loaded up on pontoon boats, dragging the kids on a tube across the water. Jet skis aplenty and show-boaters skiing or wake-boarding behind powerful in-board engines. Nearly every boat was flying an American flag and I spied a couple of boats flaunting a white flag with “TRUMP” in big red letters. Our friends’ neighbor popped over to say hello while we were grilling. They are a retired couple that live in Lake Tahoe, CA, but inherited the lakehouse next door. The CA folks said that CA will not allow any boats on the water on Lake Tahoe so they loaded up and drove the three days to Arkansas to escape from CA and enjoy time on the lake. They had no immediate plans to return to CA.

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Join Jim and Greg as they discuss the stunning hypocrisy of Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and her husband and other Democratic governors over Memorial Day weekend. Greg also shares a very disturbing story about voting by mail in his home state. They also shudder as President Trump spend time on Twitter trying to implicate MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough in the death of a congressional intern nearly 20 years ago. And they react to economic officials from the Clinton and Obama administrations admit they are terrified that the economy could be rebounding by Election Day.

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Join host Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer’s Bill Smith in a conversation with Hannah Mamuszka, expert in diagnostic medicine, on why the U.S. lacked adequate early testing, what current testing looks like in the Commonwealth, and where testing technology needs to be to support public gatherings in the future.

Hannah Mamuszka is Founder & CEO of ALVA10, a healthcare technology firm. Hannah has spent her 20+ year career in diagnostics – both in pharma and at diagnostics companies, in the lab and on the business side. She believes that the challenges of diagnostic technology fully impacting patient care are more commercial than technical, and conceived of ALVA10 to create a mechanism to pull technology into healthcare by aligning incentives through data. She regularly speaks on issues regarding advancement of technology in healthcare, is on the Board of Directors for two diagnostic companies and writes a column on the value of diagnostics for the Journal of Precision Medicine.

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Member Post

 

Co-morbidity not only plays a role in human deaths, but business deaths as well. One example: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2020/05/23/hertz-bankruptcy-fueled-debt-and-coronavirus/5249767002/ More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Second Look at Sweden’s Response to COVID-19

 

It’s not too late to learn from Sweden‘s management of the COVID-19 pandemic. As the first phase winds down and the results can be tallied, it is clear that Sweden is in an enviable position both economically and medically.

Rather than relying on speculative models to justify draconian policies, Sweden’s public health officials noted the lack of evidence that social isolation mandates could reduce COVID-19 deaths over the full course of the virus. Plainly put, you can change the timing of the damage but you can’t make the virus go away.

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Member Post

 

This week, our politicians formed Israel 35th government after 508 days and three rounds of elections. Israelis watched sadly the swearing-in of 34 ministers with fake titles and unknown functions and another 12 deputy ministers scratching for meaningless jobs. This government is nothing short of a gargantuan monster, bathing in a life of affluence, and […]

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