Just a Local Crime Story: Midwest Edition

 

Dr. Ulrich Klopfer died September 3. After his death, an attorney for his family summoned the Will County Sheriff to his rural home south of Chicago. You see, Dr. Klopfer had amassed an interesting collection: Two thousand, two hundred forty-six fetal remains.

Klopfer performed abortions in Fort Wayne, Gary, and South Bend, IN. In 2015, he was brought before the Indiana State Medical Board for violations at the Fort Wayne and South Bend clinics. During the proceedings, he admitted that he had performed an abortion on a ten-year-old girl who, he said, had been raped by her uncle. He also stated that he had performed abortions on 13- and 14-year-olds. He said he was unaware that he needed to report the incidents to police. After all, just because a girl comes in for an abortion doesn’t mean she was abused. Said Klopfer:

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It’s an Emergency! A Crisis! A Catastrophe! We’re All Going to Die! Arrrrgh! (Part 3)

 

Steve Marriott was a talented songwriter and guitar player who fronted seminal rock bands Humble Pie and The Small Faces. As was de rigueur for rock musicians at the time, he was also an egomaniacal jerk, drug addict and alcoholic. In April of 1991, he decided to light up a fag in bed after a night of carousing and died of smoke inhalation in the resulting fire.

He was not alone. According to the National Fire Protection Association, in the United States, over 4000 fires a year are caused by smokers, resulting in about 500 deaths and 1000 injuries. Of course, Marriott died in England. I can’t find the morbidity and mortality stats, but smoking appears to be responsible for about 2800 fires in Great Britain every year. If they were proportional to the U. S., that would mean 350 deaths and 700 injures.

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If One Truly Believes in the Climate Catastrophe … Then It’s War!

 

For those people who truly believe that the world only has 12 years (or less) to solve the climate crisis or there will be a global catastrophe of biblical proportions, is the following a fair question?

Given general agreement that developed countries cannot solve the carbon problem without the full participation of China and India: Do you agree that if diplomatic pressure brought to bear by the countries that are serious about climate change does not convince China and India to cooperate with our attempt to save the planet, that these serious countries should go to war with China and India to compel them to abandon their coal-fired power plants, and thus save the world?

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Member Post

 

British “researchers” apparently have a lot of time on their hands. In a BBC-prepared video to be shown in British schools, a teacher tells students there are over 100 genders besides male and female: https://www.breitbart.com/education/2019/09/13/bbc-tells-schoolchildren-there-are-over-100-genders/ More

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It’s not part of Ricochet’s portfolio, but I just listened to a very interesting podcast interview of General (retired) John Kelly. Hosted by the U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings Magazine, it covers his career with the U.S. Marine Corps, which included his participation in the invasion of Iraq in 2003 and as the Commander of U.S. […]

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World History Begins in 1200 AD

 

I happened upon the changes being made to the high school level AP World History course beginning this fall. AP classes are a College Board scam (in my opinion) where students are led to believe they will earn college credit if they take this course in high school, and pass the test at a certain level (for which there is a fee). Not all colleges will accept this credit, but that information is not widely disseminated.

At any rate, the AP World History class, rather than starting in the Paleolithic era as in previous years, now begins at 1200 AD (they use CE, but I do not). Apparently, the development of societies, trade, etc., before 1200 is not pertinent to what happened afterward. I skimmed through the class guide, here is a PDF link if you are interested.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are pleased to see a high-ranking government official actually moving closer to facing the same type of prosecution most Americans would face for allegedly divulging sensitive information and then lying about it. Jim also hilariously shreds CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin for acting like […]

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Bring back the draft. The only thing left and right agree upon these days is that left and right cannot find anything to agree on. Political violence is on the upswing, and there are fewer parts of life each year that are apolitical. It would be foolish to expect to find agreement on everything, or a […]

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ChoiceMedia‘s Bob Bowdon and Pioneer Institute‘s Cara Candal talk about charter school authorizing in California and a recent bill that gives school districts rather than the state the authority to approve charter schools; good news for online learning programs in Oklahoma; and is there a shortage of teachers in American schools? Plus, Bob calls out […]

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Maybe, Baby

 

If you knew you only had a 1% chance of surviving tomorrow, would you consider that a death sentence? What about 2%, 5%, 10%… at what point would your odds of survival be good enough you wouldn’t feel doomed? And what if you had to purchase your fairly slim chance at survival by risking the life of another? When would you do it? What balance of risk would just barely escape counting as doom?

What if you were the other whose life was risked on the slim hope of avoiding someone else’s death sentence? When would that hope be worth it, and when would it be a forlorn one? How effective must our efforts to lift another’s doom be in order to merit the price?

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice for utterly rejecting the suggestion from NBC’s Savannah Guthrie that Russian meddling may have tipped the 2016 election to President Trump – and explaining what really did happen. They also welcome the U.S. Supreme Court siding with […]

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The War on Vaping

 

Hey, let’s regulate something people do that harms no one.

The new policy announced by Trump will toughen marketing rules the FDA has been developing for e-cigs for months. Manufacturers would have to show their e-cigarettes don’t pose a public health threat. They would also need to demonstrate why e-cigs without the added flavors should stay on the market. Until then, the administration can order all flavored vapors off the market.

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How Liberals Pass Unpopular Laws

 

When I lived in California, I noticed that they had a special way to enact laws that School House Rock never taught me. And I’m seeing it being done here in Austin now.

Here’s how it works: Say the legislature wants to enact a law that is very unpopular because it will cost everyone $100 a month. It would never get passed because everyone would howl unceasingly. Instead, they propose a law that will cost everyone $10,000 a month and when everyone howls and protests and demonstrates against it, the legislature will back down and say, whew, you citizens were right, that is too much. Let’s modify the proposal so that it only costs $100 a month. Everyone breathes a sigh of relief, protesters go home, and everyone is happy that they stopped a disaster.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see Republicans hold on to a pair of North Carolina congressional seats, including one that Democrats were hoping would be a harbinger of 2020. They also shudder as Iranian President Hassan Rouhani cheers the exit of National Security Adviser John Bolton […]

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The Gravity of Owning and Carrying a Gun

 

On my walk this morning, I was wearing a neon pink t-shirt. As often happens, I approached two women with their dogs; we always exchange pleasantries and I get my dog fix (scratching dog ears). Suddenly one of the women looked at my t-shirt and said, “Isn’t Smith & Wesson a gun company?” I answered yes, and followed with my first stupid comment, “Yes, I own a gun.” She responded, “Oh, you were the last person I would expect to own a gun!” Second stupid response: “I promise not to shoot either of you,” as I walked away.

Okay, okay, I made some foolish comments in a record period of time. First, wearing the shirt publicly wasn’t the best idea, although I often wear it to my workout facility where no one has said anything. Second, after answering that Smith & Wesson was a gun company, I could have smiled and walked away. (Hey, it was 7:00am!) Or I could have said, “Yes, why do you ask?” and been open to a careful but friendly conversation.

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Evil in Our Midst

 

So today, the House Judiciary Committee heard testimony about the “Born Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act,” a piece of legislation Speaker Pelosi refuses to allow the House to vote on. Killing a child born in the course of an abortion is illegal; however, neglecting such a child until it dies remains legal. The testimony coming out of this committee is so sickening it had me seeing red:

But OBGYN Kathi Aultman, a former medical director at a Planned Parenthood abortion clinic, testified that nurse Julie Wilkinson — who assisted an abortionist with late-term abortions — told her “that the vast majority of abortions that they performed were done for convenience, not for fetal anomalies or maternal health problems.” …

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Breaking news makes this a four martini lunch! Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America start by noting the Democrats have lost every bit of the approval advantage they enjoyed over the GOP a year ago and Jim offers an analysis that both parties would be wise to heed but never […]

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Some things I had rather just overlook, but “they” make it just impossible to ignore. They keep rubbing my nose in a mess I had no part in making. This morning I completed the registration process for a Doctors appointment this PM. In that process I was asked to select a gender, and was given […]

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Dog Walkers for Bernie

 

I spotted this from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette this morning:

In Pennsylvania alone, Mr. Sanders’ Democratic presidential campaign has received $1,432 from 40 dog trainers, groomers, handlers and walkers. That’s more than the Vermont senator received from firefighters ($1,279), hairstylists ($835) and self-proclaimed wrestlers ($45), and only slightly less than farmers ($1,662) statewide.

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The Ability of Markets

 

This past week, New York Times reporter Ben Casselman wrote a powerful story with the provocative title “In a Tight Labor Market, a Disability May Not Be a Barrier.” The article praised the diversity and inclusion initiatives that are now deeply embedded in modern corporate culture. Casselman told the moving story of Kate Cosway, who obtained her master’s degree in chemistry and chemical engineering in 2014. Cosway is on the autism spectrum. Her difficulty with interviews meant her job quest had little traction until this past summer when she was taken on as an intern at Dell Technologies in the company’s audit department. She did well and earned a permanent paying position in the fall. After lauding Cosway’s rise, Casselman asks: How long will the present-day hiring party last if an economic downturn is brought about by President Donald Trump’s on-again-off-again trade war with China?

Cosway is no anomaly in today’s hot job market. Thousands of workers who were once thought marginalized and unemployable are now being pursued by employers with tempting offers: good benefits, flexible hours, and training on the job. Ex-cons, college students, retirees, and members of minority groups are all being lured into the labor market by employers faced with serious labor shortages.

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