Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I live near Little Asia in Mesa. This commercial community has been flourishing, revitalizing a portion of a run down part of town. The latest good sign is the opening of an H Mart. This is a Korean-American supermarket chain with everything from inexpensive to luxury items. The store opened as Arizona started recovering from […]

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Gordon Wood, Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown University and author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Radicalism of the American Revolution. Professor Wood shares his wisdom about the many ways in which the Revolution marked a new beginning for humanity, reversing the centuries-old, top-down understanding of government and society. They begin with the efforts of Founders such as Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Rush to institute universal public education to nurture the well-educated and enlightened citizenry that they viewed as the backbone of the Republic. They discuss why George Washington’s “disinterest” in political rewards for military victory was so unique and extraordinary among his international contemporaries. Professor Wood also explains how the American Revolution gave rise to the first anti-slave movements in world history, and how actions taken to abolish slavery led to its eventual demise as a result of the Civil War. They also delve into the lives of the Revolutionary era’s often less well-known female figures, including Abigail Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, Judith Sargent Murray, and the inspirational freed slave poet, Phillis Wheatley. Professor Wood concludes with observations on Aaron Burr, popularized through “Hamilton,” the phenomenally successful musical, and the character traits and actions that have cast Burr as one of American history’s most notorious Founding era figures. The Learning Curve team would like to wish everyone a Happy Fourth of July!

Stories of the Week: A Good Morning America feature story highlights how African-American history will likely see greater traction across the nation’s classrooms, thanks to teachers’ efforts to move beyond outdated textbooks and create their own culturally-sensitive learning materials. The supervisory group for the Nation’s Report Card announced this week that it is cancelling national assessments of U.S. history or civics in 2021 for eighth graders. Is this decision reflective of a legitimate concern about spreading COVID, or merely a concession to the country’s growing anti-testing movement?

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Anyone encountered this lid in the wild? It looks like the cat’s pajamas and a strong contender for the #1 spot occupied by the Dunkin’ lid. More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Leftist Education Created This Moment

 

Toppled Christopher Columbus statue, St. Paul, MN.
If you are disgusted with the lawless chaos that America has been subjected to recently, you have our educational system, especially our universities, to blame.

American-hating thugs who topple statutes and demand policymaking authority over our once proud nation are the direct result of the takeover of our universities by left-wing radicals. They have relentlessly propagandized young Americans to believe our history is a shameful litany of racism, imperialism, and exploitation.

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Ambiguity and lots of it, I guess. I wouldn’t know. It is only very seldom that I am awake and active at the same time Coast to Coast AM is. The only reason I am broaching the subject now is, I was looking into Trindade, and the search engine’s first suggestion had to do with […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. One Man’s Stand

 

This was written by my friend Nate Ellis. Shout it from the rooftops.

As a born-again Christian living in America, I have much to be thankful for and nothing to be ashamed of. Because I am taught by Christ to not judge on the basis of skin color, I am not part of the problem but part of the solution. Because I am created in God’s image, I would be smacking God in the face If I apologized for my white skin, and since I have never treated anyone differently for the color of theirs, I have no guilt. The only privilege I have is to grow up in a home where my parents who had nothing, loved me and my four brothers and sisters, and sacrificed everything to raise us to reverence God and respect the sacrifices of those who laid down their life for our freedom and security. This, in spite of the fact, my mother practically raised her own brother at the age of ten on, due to growing up in the home of an alcoholic, and the fact my dad worked two or three jobs to put food on the table. He also did this so my mother could stay home and keep us from being brainwashed in the public education system. That way, we could learn real American history, which taught us that although our founding fathers weren’t perfect, they were ahead of their own time, and used by God to bring about a nation unlike any other nation on earth that would be a haven for millions of immigrants from around the world to find freedom of religion and eventually freedom from oppression.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I’ve received many emails from companies supporting BLM. We’ve all seen the recent cases of BLM protestors randomly attacking cars. I wonder if the victims can sue the corporate supporters for putting their lives in danger. Perhaps the cause-effect is too tenuous, but it would be nice to deter future corporate stupidity. More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Criminals may not be smart, perhaps cunning would be the appropriate word. Criminals adapt to their environment. When the Covid19 lockdowns began commercial burglaries began to rise in some cities. Shop, restaurant owners, and other business owners, began boarding up their business before the Summer of Love riots, looting and arson began. Noha Kassab can […]

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This week, in a special segment of “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are honored to be joined by Kendra Espinoza, lead plaintiff in the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, just decided yesterday, Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, and Erica Smith, an attorney with the Institute for Justice, which represented the plaintiffs. Kendra shares what motivated her and her daughters, Naomi and Sarah, to take such a courageous stand for school choice and religious liberty, and describes her experience being the lead plaintiff in a high-profile Supreme Court case. She also discusses the other Montana moms involved in the case, their reaction to the successful outcome, and the realization of the impact it will have on so many families across the country. Erica shares her thoughts on the decision’s wide-ranging constitutional implications; some surprising aspects of the decision that may prompt future legal battles; and a preview of a state-by-state analysis on which states are best positioned to expand access to school choice now.

Story of the Week: Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the plaintiffs in the Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue case, involving Montana parents who were denied access to a state tax credit program when they sought to use it to send their children to religious schools. The Court held that Montana’s Blaine Amendment cannot be used to exclude religious school parents from the state education tax credit program. In the majority opinion, Chief Justice Roberts wrote: “A State need not subsidize private education. But once a State decides to do so, it cannot disqualify some private schools solely because they are religious.”

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Properly punctuated, an excellent root beer, but here I refer to the Portuguese initials of the Brazilian Coffee Institute. I was just thinking up a slogan for it. Not that it needs one now – the office went out of existence in 1989 – or needed one earlier. Uhh…”It’s All About The Coffee.” No; that’s […]

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Steven Crowder’s crew went into CHAZ/CHOP a few days ago. Turns out the warlord Raz has an apartment listed as an Air B&B, so the Crowder team rented it out and gave the warlord a tiny taste of his own medicine. Childish? Yep. Do I care about that? No. Crowder’s team also convinced some squatters […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Atlanta Especially Hot with Leftist and Criminal Violence

 

The mayor of Atlanta, a Democrat as usual, admitted that police morale is down significantly. It is no coincidence that murder is through the roof in Atlanta, as the police correctly judge that the mayor and local prosecutors are against them and with the leftist domestic terrorists and the criminal gangs. Governor Kemp, a Republican from the business wing, has so far done nothing and said nothing except to sign and celebrate a “hate crime” bill that now puts Christians under persecution as bigots if they follow the Bible on sexuality. Hotlanta may burn again, this time from within, thanks again to ineffective local and state leadership.

CBS News reported on Atlanta Mayor Bottoms’ comments over a week ago:

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Join Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer Institute’s Senior Fellow in Healthcare Josh Archambault as they discuss the benefits of direct primary care. In this episode, Dr. Jeffrey Gold shares his vision for the future of primary care and his passion for delivering care the way it was intended – through trust, openness, and investing in the doctor-patient relationship.

Guest: Jeffrey S. Gold, MD, is owner and primary care physician at Gold Direct Care in Marblehead, Massachusetts. He earned his undergraduate degree at University of Pennsylvania and his medical degree at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The primary care physicians in his practice serve over 600 patients.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Criminal Vigilantism

 

Vigilantism is much in the news these days.

Depending on the definition you choose, vigilantism may or may not be inherently illegal. Concerned citizens standing in front of a jailhouse to prevent a lynching, as depicted in To Kill a Mockingbird for example, would be performing a completely legal kind of vigilantism by some definitions. Usually, however, the implication of vigilantism, and particularly of “vigilante justice,” is that citizens are taking it upon themselves to act as judge, jury, and, occasionally, executioner in order to impose their idea of justice — and doing so illegally.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Should Cops Get ‘Qualified Immunity?’

 

The United States had just under 700,000 sworn enforcement officers in 2018, of whom 106 were killed in the line of duty that year. These officers are distributed among some 18,000 federal, state, and local police departments, which range in size from 36,000 officers in New York City to ten or fewer in hundreds of smaller towns and hamlets. All these individuals and departments are linked together by their license to use force when necessary to prevent violence and the destruction of property.

This raises a question: What legal regime should be implemented to prevent abuse by police officers?

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Some safety tips for protestors. I’ll admit I’m an old school guy. I believe in keeping my hands to myself, and keeping my hands off things that do not belong to me. As I told some people that I arrested; “Your life would be a lot less complicated if you did nothing more than sit […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Discuss: Brandishing a Gun in a Gated Community

 

This is very interesting. This is either a gated community or an estate. Is the wife going to get in trouble for brandishing a weapon? I don’t know the law. What would you do?

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Justice Thomas’s Blistering Dissent on Monday’s Abortion Ruling

 

In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court struck down a Louisiana abortion law requiring doctors who provide abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of their clinic. Chief Justice Roberts again sided with the left in Monday’s ruling on June Medical Services v. Russo. (PDF here.)

Associate Justice Clarence Thomas offered a blistering dissent not only against this decision but the entirety of abortion jurisprudence since Roe v. Wade was decided. Below are excerpts from Justice Thomas’s remarks.

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Police across the nation are getting gun-shy (no pun intended) to use force in a confrontation when it’s necessary because of the overwhelming (and often political) legal aftermath. Given the large number of riots, looting, arsons, and attacks on cops, maybe governors or mayors should have the power to grant absolute immunity during a civil […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Murder and Race in the United States

 

The current BLM narrative, peddled nonstop by the mainstream media, would make one think that it’s open season on black Americans and that the hunters are all whites. I think that this is a completely false narrative. The fundamental problem is black-on-black crime, particularly with respect to the worst of all crimes — murder.

I rely on the FBI’s 2018 Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) data. I’ll provide specific links at the end.

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