On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Nathan Harden, an author at Real Clear Education, joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss how online schooling exacerbated free speech problems on college campuses across the United States.

Join Jim Geraghty and Greg Corombos as they discuss the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial and welcome a peaceful night in Minneapolis. They also condemn President Biden for his disgusting suggestion that we are a systemically racist country and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for her absurd comment that George Floyd sacrificed himself for justice. And they’re less than enthused about reports that former New Jersey gov. Chris Christie is seriously considering a White House bid in 2024.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, author Claire Culwell joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss her new book “Survivor: An Abortion Survivor’s Surprising Story Of Choosing Forgiveness And Finding Redemption” and her journey to healing after discovering she survived an abortion her birth mother was forced to have.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome Judge Cahill publicly rebuking Rep. Maxine Waters for demanding a guilty verdict and demanding more confrontation from demonstrators if they don’t get it. They also hammer CBS News for talking about where some of the jurors live as we wait for a verdict. And they cringe while discussing a legal effort to decriminalize incest in New York. Finally, they share their memories of former Vice President Walter Mondale, who died Monday at age 93.

Host Joe Selvaggi talks with Bloomberg Opinion writer and National Review senior editor Ramesh Ponnuru about the national zeitgeist in a post-Covid, post-President Trump future.

Guest:

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Sarah Robinson, author of “I Love Jesus, But I Want to Die,” joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss how the decline of community and COVID lockdowns has affected Americans’ mental health and how to navigate it.

Join Jim and Greg as they see some glimmers of good news for Putin critic Alexei Navalny but wonder how firm the Biden administration really plans to be when it comes to Russia. They also shudder as prices for fuel, food, and other goods, are clearly on the rise. And they call out Rep. Maxine Waters for suggesting anything less than a guilty verdict for murder in the Derek Chauvin case should result in more confrontation in the streets.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome an appeals court decision upholding an Ohio ban on abortions because the unborn baby has Down Syndrome. They also fume as the intel community admits there is only low to moderate confidence in last year’s reports that Russia was offering bounties to the Taliban and its allies for killing coalition forces in Afghanistan. And they shake their heads at the obvious court-packing hypocrisy of Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey.

Ellen Bork is a veteran analyst of Far Eastern affairs—and a devoted friend of freedom and democracy. Perry Link is an eminent professor of Chinese and Chinese literature—and a friend and helper of dissidents, over the years. They are part of a new effort called the Committee for Freedom in Hong Kong. The Chinese government has cracked down ferociously on that city, that outpost. For Taiwan, too, this is a nerve-wracking time. Jay’s guests talk about these matters and more, with eloquence, experience, and heart. 

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Senior Editor Christopher Bedford and Assistant Editor Kylee Zempel join Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss the dangers of vaccine passports and how Republican politicians should respond to them.

Joe Selvaggi discusses a recently released survey from Pioneer Institute and Emerson Polling, “Massachusetts Residents’ Perceptions of K-12 Education During the Covid-19 Pandemic,” with Emerson’s lead analyst, Isabel Holloway, and Pioneer Institute’s Charlie Chieppo. Read the poll here.

Guests:

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, PragerU’s Jill Simonian joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss the organization’s new PragerU Resources for Educators and Parents program that reinforces character-building and American values that public schools do not teach.

Join Jim and Greg as they shred the blatantly partisan attempt by congressional Democrats to add four more seats (meaning lefties) to the U.S. Supreme Court but welcome House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announcing she has “no plans” to bring the bill up for a vote. They also react to the new polling showing a sharp drop in public confidence in the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine since the FDA ordered a pause this week. And they examine how Michigan’s COVID numbers are very high but interest in the vaccine is quite low.

Immigrants have higher rates of entrepreneurship than the U.S.-born at 11.5% compared to 9%But there’s one group with even higher rates of business generation: refugees. Refugees have a 13% rate of entrepreneurship. They are good for our economy, but we also save lives by accepting them. There are at least 79.5 million people worldwide forced to flee their homes. For some perspective, that’s less than 1% of the world’s population, and yet last year the U.S. settled an astonishingly low 11,814 refugees. 

For Hong Tran of Worcester, Massachusetts, his early life in Vietnam and even the journey to seek safety in the U.S. was filled with tragedyHe was orphaned while fleeing and lost his baby sister to pirates in the ocean. Thankfully, the U.S. gave him and his remaining family refuge, and they have given backThey have excelled at entrepreneurship, with his aunt and uncle launching three businesses while he grew up, and today Hong has a diner, a laundromat, a liquor store, a real estate company, and a law firm under his belt, creating more than 50 jobs in the process. Hong knows what it’s like to have nothing. Even with the rise in anti-Asian bigotry, he is determined to use his influence to help other immigrants and refugees get a leg up in their new homeland

Member Post

 

On this episode of the Resistance Library Podcast Sam Jacobs welcomes Tho Bishop onto the show. Tho Bishop is the Assistant Editor of Mises.com and a proud Florida Man. He recently penned an article on a Rothbardian right as an alternative to the paleo-progressivism of Theodore Roosevelt. He believes this to be the fighting ideology […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Margaret Harper McCarthy, an associate professor of theological anthropology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies in Marriage and the Family at Catholic University, joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss her recent Wall Street Journal article that argues “The Equality Act Is at War With Reality.”

Anyone paying attention to the news knows the situation on the U.S.-Mexico border is terrible. Anyone who actually visits the border discovers it is worse than that. This is a report on a recent trip to the border in Mission, Texas, where U.S. officials are scrambling to handle thousands of migrants who are crossing the border illegally. The Biden administration’s response to the crisis — which it created — is entirely improvised. Officials are not trying to stop would-be migrants from crossing illegally into the U.S. Instead, they are just trying to accommodate them until they can be sent to cities and towns across the country. And even at that job, they are overwhelmed. A first-person look, plus the reactions of U.S. lawmakers — all Republicans — who care enough about the issue to visit the border.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Jay Mathews, an education columnist for The Washington Post and author of the recent book, An Optimist’s Guide to American Public Education. Jay describes the three key trends in K-12 schooling that he views as cause for hope. They also discuss the tensions between high-profile, college prep-centered school reformers and the dominant pedagogical outlook found across many of the major schools of education. They explore teacher-driven school reforms, whether led by legendary figures such as Jaime Escalante in traditional public schools, or in charter networks such as KIPP, which have established high-caliber teacher preparation programs. Drawing on his decades spent covering K-12 education for The Washington Post, he shares observations about the quality and success of the U.S. Department of Education’s policymaking, and the strengths and weaknesses of federal education efforts in contrast to what he has observed in states, districts, and schools. They also talk about the most effective ways to spend the massive infusion of federal money school districts are receiving through COVID relief. Next, he offers insights on American journalism, print media’s struggles to adapt to a digital world, the impact on K-12 education coverage, and suggestions for improvement. As someone whose education background and early career focused on Asia, he offers thoughts on U.S.-China relations and the wider implications for America’s global competitiveness in K-12 school reform. He concludes with a reading from his new book.

Stories of the Week: Are unnecessarily severe middle school discipline policies and practices that disproportionately target students of color exacerbating the school-to-prison pipeline? Writing in The Wall Street JournalEducation Next‘s Ira Stoll explores the debate in Boston about changing admissions policies at exam schools, and whether outside organizations, such as the Red Sox baseball team, should weigh in on the issue.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Gordana Schifanelli, a lawyer and immigrant, joins Executive Editor Joy Pullmann to explain how she successfully fought off a critical race theory mob from indoctrinating her children in schools and threatening her family and career.

ACF Europe #14: Dear Comrades

 

So the ACF series on totalitarianism and cinema continues with our first Russian movie–the best movie of 2020, at that–Andrey Konchalovsky’s story of a young workers’ protest which turned into a Soviet massacre, indeed one so thorough that even knowledge of it, even the corpses of the murdered protesters, were suppressed. The artistic view of this evil deed opposes to ideology the private side of human life–a mother and daughter, the possibility of faith, the importance of burial. The movie is available in streaming and it’s a wonderful contribution to the recent European interest in stories about the evils of communism. @FlaggTaylor and I have talked about a lot of them, and we have some more upcoming!