Carol Roth gives you a preview of her upcoming book, The War on Small Business (available for pre-order now) and why the challenges to economic freedom transcend just the backbone of the economy. While the COVID pandemic gave the government the opportunity to attack small businesses and consolidate power, the groundwork has been set forth for decades. Carol talks about everything from the transfer of wealth abetted by the Federal Reserve to the exportation of capitalism to China in exchange for more central planning in the US and why it is threatening our individual rights and economy.

Plus, a “Now You Know” on the origins of “shirt loops”.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Dr. Weifeng Zhong, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss the Biden administration’s approach to China and how the U.S. should interact with the communist regime.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Senior Editor Christopher Bedford and Assistant Editor Kylee Zempel join Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to analyze President Joe Biden’s address to the joint session of Congress.

Gulchehra Hoja works at Radio Free Asia, in Washington, D.C. She is a Uyghur, a Uyghur American. The Chinese government has imprisoned more than a million Uyghurs in a new network of concentration camps—a new gulag archipelago. Among the prisoners are many of Gulchehra Hoja’s relatives. She and her colleagues at RFA have paid a terrible price for their truth-telling; so have their families. Ms. Hoja talks with Jay about her life, her work, and the horror of it all. A tremendously informative and moving podcast. 

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Max Faingezicht, an immigrant who founded ThriveHive, a marketing software company for small businesses, and Telescoped, which uses remote software engineering to connect Latin American engineers with U.S. companies in need of their skills. The entrepreneurial ecosystem of Boston and Cambridge have allowed Max to achieve dreams he didn’t even know he had when he arrived. He can now foster entrepreneurship in his home country of Costa Rica while bringing much-needed talent to U.S. companies, all the while influencing what the future of work will look like. In this episode, he shares his fascinating immigration story, as well as his ideas on where workers go next.

Guest:

Member Post

 

The new iOS 14.5 has redesigned the Podcast App, and it’s a complete disaster for a number of reasons.  That said, after figuring out the new way to navigate it, remove and/or hide played episodes (showing up from several years ago, long deleted), and so on, it seems the Superfeed “show” will not show any […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Young America’s Foundation spokeswoman Kara Zupkus joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss how the last year of government-mandated lockdowns and COVID-19 mitigation techniques have affected people in Generation Z.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome polls showing more Americans want their second amendment rights vigorously protected. They also go dizzy as President Biden trots out his third multi-trillion dollar spending binge.  And they react to a Vogue writer agonizing over whether to have a baby because she is convinced the child is damaging to the planet.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Dr. Marguerite Roza, Research Professor and Director of the Edunomics Lab at Georgetown University. Professor Roza describes the three distinct phases of how American K-12 education has been funded over the last 40 years, and implications for equity and overall student achievement. She offers perspectives on the productivity of America’s $800 billion annual spending on K-12 education, with 90 percent funded by state and local governments. Professor Roza shares thoughts on the strengths and weaknesses of federal K-12 spending and policymaking, given that NAEP scores and achievement gaps remain largely unchanged after Race to the Top and ESSA. With only about half of total K-12 spending allocated to student instruction, she shares concerns about the growth of bureaucracies and non-instructional staffing at all levels – especially in larger urban school districts, where per pupil spending surpasses $20,000, yet achievement gaps and low graduation rates persist. Lastly, they explore the role of philanthropy in K-12 education’s ongoing struggles to deliver better results for schoolchildren, and criticisms by Diane Ravitch and the teacher unions.

Stories of the Week: Harvard Professor Cornel West laments Howard University’s decision to dismantle its Classics Department, noting the influence of ancient thinkers on Frederick Douglass and the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Private schools have remained open for most of the past year while their public counterparts have stayed closed – is that a sign of the imbalance in power between parents and teachers unions?

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Anatol Lieven, a senior research fellow on Russia and Europe at the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft, joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss the Biden administration’s approach to climate change and why the left’s current strategy to mitigate it is set up to fail.

Hubwonk Host Joe Selvaggi talks with Emergency Preparedness expert Dr. Paul Biddinger about how experts plan for disasters, and what went right and wrong in this pandemic.

Guest:

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, J.C. Bradbury, a professor of economics at Kennesaw State University, joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to break down how Hollywood is using Georgia’s secretive film tax credit for its own gain.

Remember the shooting at the House Republican baseball practice just outside of Washington? A zealous Bernie Sanders supporter and Trump hater named James Hodgkinson, armed with a semi-automatic rifle, attacked a group of GOP lawmakers as they practiced for the annual Congressional Baseball Game. Representative Steve Scalise was gravely wounded. A lobbyist was seriously hurt, and two others were wounded, as well. The shooter was specifically seeking to attack Republicans. He had in his pocket a list of GOP lawmakers he wanted to attack. And he asked before opening fire whether the group on the field was Republican or Democrat. It was an absolutely clear case of politically motivated domestic terrorism. And yet it has just been revealed that the FBI did not label it domestic terrorism. Instead, the bureau maintained that Hodgkinson was simply trying to commit “suicide by cop.” The FBI’s conclusion left Republicans stunned, and now they’re seeking answers.

Join Jim and Greg as give President Biden credit for correctly labeling the Ottoman slaughter of Armenians last century as a genocide, They also rip John Kerry for reportedly telling Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Zarif that Israel was responsible for more than 200 attacks against Iranian interests inside Syria. And they shake their heads as Vice President Harris seems unmotivated to solve the border crisis yet copies of her kids book are showing up at a migrant facility in California.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Senior Editor Christopher Bedford and Assistant Editor Kylee Zempel join Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to outline how the corporate media adopt radical left narratives that purposefully distort the U.S.’s self-image.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome Arizona Democratic Sen.  Mark Kelly opposing expansion of the U.S. Supreme Court under any circumstances. They also wince as Virginia announces there will be no accelerated high school math classes until the 11th grade. And they have very different reactions to the news that Caitlyn Jenner is running for governor in California.

 

On this episode of “The Federalist Radio Hour,” Independent Women’s Forum Senior Policy Analyst and Federalist Senior Contributor Inez Feltscher Stepman joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss Camille Paglia and how conservatives should view her thinking and writing.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome House Republicans trying to force the Biden administration to keep the effective Trump-era sanctions on Iran. They also unload on Biden for his ridiculous, non-binding goal of curbing greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent by the end of the decade – and for his climate agenda that would really just grow government. And they have some fun with Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot suggesting police officers get permission from a supervisor before chasing criminals on foot.

 

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Professor Arnold Rampersad, the Sara Hart Kimball Professor Emeritus in Humanities at Stanford University and recipient of the National Humanities Medal for his books including The Life of Langston Hughes and Ralph Ellison: A Biography. They discuss what teachers and students today should know about Langston Hughes’s celebrated literary life and poetry, including his influence on African-American literati during the Harlem Renaissance, and how his works, such as “Harlem (A Dream Deferred)” and “Mississippi –1955,” impacted the Civil Rights Movement. They then turn to Ralph Ellison, whose 1952 novel, Invisible Man, is among the greatest works of 20th-century American fiction. Professor Rampersad shares the major formative experiences and intellectual influences on Ellison’s life and writing, including his Oklahoma upbringing, Tuskegee Institute education, and interest in literary figures such as Dostoevsky, Hardy, Melville, Twain, and Faulkner. He also offers insights on the connection between the writings of Hughes and Ellison, and blues and jazz music, with its complexity and exploration of suffering. Professor Rampersad concludes the interview with a reading from his biography of Ralph Ellison.

Stories of the Week: In an effort to stem COVID-related learning loss, more than 230 public schools in Hawaii will offer summer school on campus for free, using federal relief funds. In Baltimore, high school students started a mentorship program to help younger peers on topics such as financial assistance, standardized testing, and course selection.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Hilda Torres, an immigrant from Mexico who runs My Little Best Friends Early Learning Center in Malden, Massachusetts. One of the most successful businesses in the city, the center enrolls over 100 students whose parents come from more than 25 different countries. In this episode, Hilda shares how she used the tools of education, and her own grit and determination, to make her mark in the land of opportunity.

Guest: