Join Greg and Emily Jashinsky of The Federalist as they welcome signs from Sen. Susan Collins that she has no intention of ending the filibuster to pass abortion legislation but they also note how abortion could cause tension inside a GOP coalition that now includes a lot of people who don’t consider themselves social conservatives. They also wonder why U.S. officials would publicly confirm that American intelligence has been directly involved in tracking and targeting Russian generals killed by Ukraine. And they fire back as Biden climate adviser Gina McCarthy vows an aggressive green agenda – including more than a hundred regulations on appliances and severe demands for “sustainable airlines.”

 

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Artur Sousa, immigrant from Brazil and founder and CEO of Adopets, an online platform that simplifies the work done by shelters and improves the pet adoption experience. Adopets has over 40,000 registered users and maintains more than 300,000 adoption listings. In this week’s JobMakers, Artur describes how opportunity, capitalism, circumstance and a rescue pup successfully aligned to fuel his social entrepreneurship success; though he is keenly aware that not every immigrant shares in the American Dream.

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Rob explains why managing “the talent” —which includes anyone who interacts with studio management— sometimes calls for techniques that are more commonly associated with calming infants. Or 19th century schizophrenics. Rob also reveals the strategy to winning any exchange involving talent, notes, deals, or even controversies that play out in the media. He guarantees it. Are you listening, Mr Chapek?

Join Greg and Ricochet.com Editor-in-Chief Jon Gabriel as they welcome fundraising and polling news that significantly contradicts the idea that overturning Roe v. Wade will move midterm momentum to the Democrats. They also shudder at reports the CDC as tracking our movements through our cell phones to make sure we were complying with lockdown orders. And they take aim at the Lincoln Project and others who pretended to be conservatives for many years but are now supposedly appalled at the idea of Roe being struck down. Of course it’s all just part of their ongoing efforts to fleece liberal donors in the name of opposing the political right.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Eric Hanushek, the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. Dr. Hanushek shares how he first became interested in the economics of education, his plans for the nearly $4 million in funding from the prestigious Yidan Prize, which he received in 2021, and where he sees the greatest need for additional research in education. He shares findings from a recent Hoover Education Summit panel, focusing on educational performance among high- and low-performing countries, and how the U.S. compares on global measures. They explore why U.S. reading and math results on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) have remained flat, despite $800 billion spent annually, and the impact of persistent achievement gaps on individual social mobility and global competitiveness. They discuss his February study on some of the ways parents influence the “intergenerational transmission of cognitive skills,” and how this impacts the lifetime outcomes of children and K-12 education policymaking.

Stories of the Week: In Tennessee, Gov. Bill Lee signed into law a sweeping change designed to standardize and streamline the funding formula for the state’s K-12 education system. National polling from NPR and Ipsos finds high rates of parent satisfaction with their children’s schooling, despite contentious K-12 culture wars.

Join Greg and Ricochet Editor-in-Chief Jon Gabriel as they dissect the leaking of a draft majority opinion that shows a majority of Supreme Court justices prepared to overturn Roe v. Wade. First, they discuss the significant damage the leak may do to the functioning and credibility of the Supreme Court. They also highlight why they hope the draft will be the majority opinion in terms of shifting abortion back to the states and why the pro-life movement clearly has a legal high ground. And they react to some of the most unhinged statements from Democrats in response to the breaking news.

Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with education financing expert Mark Kantrowitz about the $1.6 trillion in U.S. public student debt – who owes it, who stands to benefit from the Biden administration’s recent promise for across-the-board student debt reductions, and what strategies are available to target only those most in need.

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Join Jim and Greg as they cautiously welcome reports that Democrats not only worry about losing control of the U.S. Senate this year but fear even bigger losses in 2024. They also hammer DHS Sec. Alejandro Mayorkas for failing to secure our borders and his new idea of diverting medical personnel and money from the VA to deal with the human tide of illegal immigrants. And they’re even more unnerved by the idea of a Disinformation Governance Board and the the person chosen to run it.

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three bad martinis tempered with some brief banter about the NFL Draft. First, they wince as the economy actually suffered negative growth in the first quarter of 2022. Then, they hammer the Biden administration for its new “Disinformation Governance Board,” which appears to be little more than an effort to stop speech it doesn’t like. And they react to a major escalation in state-run Russian commentary, which now openly refers to the Ukrainian conflict as a holy war and frequently suggests the use of nuclear weapons.

 

As Jay says in his introduction, Matthew Continetti is “a conservative and a conservative-ologist: a student of conservatism, a dissector of it, an expert on it. He has written a new book: The Right: The Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism.’” Jay and Matt have a meaty hour on conservatism. And they barely get started. 

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Karina Calderon, deputy director of The Lawrence Partnership, about her work to help immigrant entrepreneurs drive economic growth in Lawrence, Massachusetts. The Lawrence Partnership is a collaboration of business and civic leaders started in 2015 that helps by incubating, training, assisting, loaning, basically doing everything they and their partners can to grow the city’s businesses. The model they’ve adopted is replicable for sure, and is one based on longstanding relationships and trust between new and longtime residents. Karina explains how it works, shares some of the success stories of their immigrant small business owners, and details her own immigration story, as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers.  

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome what appears to be the Biden administration’s grudging admission that there won’t be a new Iran nuclear deal. They also hammer President Biden for reportedly getting ready to pander to his base through massive student loan forgiveness and explain who will really benefit. And they find the timing curious as Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey demands “algorithmic justice” after Elon Musk buys Twitter.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Wilfried Schmid, Dwight Parker Robinson Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at Harvard University, who played a major role in drafting the 2000 Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework and served on the U.S. National Mathematics Advisory Panel (NMAP) in 2008. Dr. Schmid shares how he became interested in mathematics, and how it was taught and encouraged in the German schools he attended. He also talks about his academic career at Harvard, his teaching experiences there and at other elite universities, and the wide disparities in the level of academic math preparation between students from America and other countries. Professor Schmid explains how he became interested in K-12 mathematics, and his work with education expert Dr. Sandra Stotsky in drafting Massachusetts’ nation-leading math standards. They discuss the “math wars” that occurred across American K-12 education, and why, even after the landmark NMAP report, this country continues to struggle with teaching students basic mathematics.

Stories of the Week: In Texas, teachers who choose to resign during the school year are being stripped of their professional certification. US News & World Report’s annual ranking of top high schools is out, and the latest list features several from Massachusetts, including Boston’s exam and charter public schools, as well as wealthy suburban districts.

Join Jim and Greg as they mostly welcome Elon Musk’s purchase of Twitter and promises of speech protection and dissect why so many on the left are hysterical about this news. They also sigh as Biden climate envoy John Kerry declares war on natural gas and promises it will be dead within 10 years. And they get a kick out of Utah “independent” U.S. Senate candidate Evan McMullin’s empty vow to caucus with neither Republicans nor Democrats if he is elected this year.

 

Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with Matthew Hennessey, Wall Street Journal editor and author of Visible Hand, A Wealth of Notions on the Miracle of the Market, about how the principles of economics manifest themselves in our every day lives and how we can use that insight to better understand our personal and civic choices.

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Join Jim and Greg as they review the latest predictions out of the Cook Political Report and  UVA Crystal Ball, which shifted 11 house races toward the Republicans. Many races were updated from ‘Likely R’ to ‘Safe R’, but it casts an ominous shadow over the Democrats’ chances of keeping the House in a critical midterm election. They also cringe at MSNBC host Nicole Wallace for calling Gov. Ron DeSantis’ education bill “dehumanizing” and comparing him and Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin Russian soldiers raping Ukrainian children. And despite being even older than Joe Biden, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is considering running for president in 2024, according to a leaked memo.

Inna Sovsun is a member of the Ukrainian parliament. What she has to say about what is happening in her country right now is very informative and not a little moving. 

Join Jim and Greg as they congratulate the Virginia legislature and Gov. Glenn Youngkin for passing common sense, bipartisan bills that outlaw formal or informal quotas on arrests and tickets by Virginia police. They also continue to be surprised at the messaging failures of the Biden White House, often with the President himself out of the loop, with transportation masking as the latest example. And despite no obvious constituency or hope of beating Donald Trump or Governor Ron DeSantis, Illinois Rep. Adam Kinzinger floated his name as a potential candidate in the 2024 presidential race.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Robert Alter, Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature at the University of California at Berkeley, and author of the landmark three-volume book, The Hebrew Bible: A Translation with Commentary. As Jews around the world celebrate Passover this week, Dr. Alter shares why the Hebrew Bible is probably the most influential book in human history, and the larger lessons 21st century teachers and students should draw from its timeless wisdom. They also discuss the text as a record of the Jewish people, and vital historical lessons of persecution, resilience, and survival. Professor Alter describes how the Psalms and the Book of Exodus’ stories of liberation and Moses’ leadership inspired several of the major figures of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview concludes with Dr. Alter reading from his trilogy.

Stories of the Week: In California, K-12 public school enrollment has declined below 6 million for the first time in over two decades, with COVID accounting for only some of the loss. New Brookings research explores whether major federal aid packages directed to schools during COVID, and after the 2008 Great Recession, have been used for the intended purpose.

Former Congressman Will Hurd has a plan: For the Republican Party; for preparing the United States to withstand a major cyber attack from a foreign adversary; and possibly for running for president in 2024. On this episode, Hurd discusses his new book, American Reboot; An Idealist’s Guide to Getting Big Things Done, and opens up about his service on Capitol Hill, his years as a clandestine officer in the Central Intelligence Agency that preceded his time in politics, and his political ambitions.