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It seemed to me that if I were doing nothing else, I should at least be collecting data. Of what? For what? I can answer at least the first question: affairs on my vacant lot. I still want to turn it into a mini-biological experiment station. Agriculture, horticulture, ecology: all good. I had the idea […]

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The push to reset the world’s society into a New World Order by the Davos group of Elites has employed endless propaganda to have most of us humans fear germs and viruses as though these items were alien interlopers we had not noticed prior to March 13 2020. But germs and viruses have co-existed inside […]

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Dogma Masquerading as Science Undermines Public Trust

 

“I believe in science, Donald Trump doesn’t. It’s that simple, folks,” Joe Biden tweeted during the 2020 election campaign.

Even by Biden standards, that was a deceitful remark. Not only did his opponent spearhead the unexpectedly efficient development of the Covid vaccine, which has been the cornerstone of pandemic suppression ever since, but the Biden administration has already done the most damage of any in memory by politicizing “the Science,” thus weakening its credibility.

Real science isn’t some facts approved by experts but a philosophical framework for acquiring and evaluating knowledge that originated in the Enlightenment. Science emphasizes reason, observation, and methodical analysis rather than loyalty to the teachings of authorities.

How to Build a Computer 40: Chemical Mechanical Planarization

 

If you’re making a modern computer chip you’re going to need to put layer after layer of traces down. You’re also going to need layer after layer of insulator between your metal in order to not short circuit everything. But if you start growing oxides and depositing metals and such and so forth your wafer is going to end up wrinklier than yer grandma’s keister. That’s going to cause problems. Your layers won’t have uniform thicknesses anymore. Particularly the photoresist which means your chances at making a decent pattern degrade. Assuming you don’t end up with fatal defects from underdeveloping at the very least you lose feature size precision. Oh, and you end up with the occasional smug columnist making you visualize yer grandma’s keister. Heh. 

Surely You Wouldn’t Be Bringing This Up if You Didn’t Have a Handy Gadget Solution?

Well you’re in luck Mr. Douglas. What you need is a Chemical Mechanical Planaraization rig. Or Chemical Mechanical Polishing. CMP. Whatever. (It makes a difference, but people often use the terms interchangeably.) Now, you could just deposit some borophosphosilicate glass on there and heat it up, expect the glass reflow, cover that topography like the snows o’ winter covering a shallow grave. In the olden days that was good enough; got the job done. These days the devices are smaller, the lines sharper. If you want real flatness, if you need to get down to a fifty angstrom step height over the surface of the entirety of your wafer, you want the real McCoy. CMP; accept no substitutes.

1955: The U.S. and U.S.S.R. Announce Satellite Programs

 

In 1950, Jim Van Allen had a party at his house. They discussed having an International Geophysical Year during the next solar maximum of 1957-58. The last surviving participant in the party, Fred Singer, died last year. On July 29th, 1955, the U.S. announced that it would launch a satellite during the IGY. Several days later the Soviet Union made a similar statement.

The U.S. set up the Stewart Committee to decide which proposal would be supported to launch a satellite. The major rivals were Milt Rosen from the Naval Research Laboratory and Wernher von Braun from the Army. On August 4th, 66 years ago, they selected the Navy proposal which became Project Vanguard. The Army protested and there were additional hearings which resulted in another vote in favor of Vanguard. My father worked on Vanguard;  he heard that von Braun thought that he “had it in the bag” and talked down to the committee. The Navy’s proposal was superior in its scientific aspects but the Army’s proposal required less development of the rocket. Milt said privately that, “They have a rocket and we don’t.”

Bari Weiss on Testosterone

 

Actually, it’s Bari’s guest, Carole Hooven, who is the expert on testosterone. Bari interviews her in this podcast, which I very much enjoyed.

Ms. Hooven is an evolutionary biologist who lectures at Harvard. Her views, while eminently sensible and also in accord with my own thoughts on the matter of human sexuality (but I repeat myself), are generating increasing friction among faculty and students (mostly graduate students, she’s careful to note) at uber-woke Harvard.

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Helicopter lessons could well possibly end. Now, no instructor ever promises anything. Instead, my instructor pointed out that I already have almost enough hours for a commercial certificate. I would be content with a private one, as I have no intention of flying for pay, and I wouldn’t have to take another FAA written exam: […]

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I never could tell that Ricochet’s physicians were much interested in the New England Journal of Medicine. I suppose its pertinence to any given medical practice is hit or miss, mostly miss. It did have a lot of articles on legal subjects, but I never could tell that Ricochet’s lawyers were much interested either. It […]

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This is the fourth of four installments from an unpublished book I wrote of my friend, Bernard Chouet, a volcano seismologist who worked  for decades at the USGS in Menlo Park and pioneered the science of volcanic predictions for certain kinds of volcanoes.  I had written the book proposal consisting only of the Prologue and […]

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This is the third of four installments from an unpublished book I wrote of my friend, Bernard Chouet, a volcano seismologist who worked  for decades at the USGS in Menlo Park and pioneered the science of volcanic predictions for certain kinds of volcanoes.  I had written the book proposal consisting only of the Prologue and […]

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Texas is big and my house is not. Nevertheless, my heat pump had a hard time finding enough heat to pump, when the outside temperature dropped to 10 last February. The fan spun, flinging off icicles, and the compressor labored. The machine could barely hold the inside temperature to whatever I had the thermostat set […]

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Many of us are familiar with some of the great things Mitch Daniels is doing as president of Purdue University including not raising tuition for a decade ( Press Release from Purdue ) or standing up for free speech on campus ( Mitch Daniels on Free Speech on Campus ) but many are not aware that […]

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Last March, I posted the Prologue to an autobiography of my friend, Bernard Chouet, a volcano seismologist who worked  for decades at the USGS in Menlo Park and pioneered the science of volcanic predictions for certain kinds of volcanoes. You may have seen the Nova episode on his work. (He is now retired in his […]

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Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with precision medicine expert Hannah Mamuszka and Pioneer Institute’s Bill Smith about the promises and pitfalls of the newly approved Alzheimer’s drug Aduhelm, and the challenges presented when new, expensive drugs of dubious benefit are introduced to the nation’s formulary.

Guest:

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Something incredible happens when teamwork happens the way it’s supposed to happen. Ultimately, when everyone on your team is equally invested in the overall purpose and goal, the performance and success of the project(s) skyrocket. You have each other’s backs, work faster, find and fix mistakes more easily, and innovate more.  Preview Open

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