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I never could tell that Ricochet’s physicians were much interested in the New England Journal of Medicine. I suppose its pertinence to any given medical practice is hit or miss, mostly miss. It did have a lot of articles on legal subjects, but I never could tell that Ricochet’s lawyers were much interested either. It […]

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This is the fourth of four installments from an unpublished book I wrote of my friend, Bernard Chouet, a volcano seismologist who worked  for decades at the USGS in Menlo Park and pioneered the science of volcanic predictions for certain kinds of volcanoes.  I had written the book proposal consisting only of the Prologue and […]

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This is the third of four installments from an unpublished book I wrote of my friend, Bernard Chouet, a volcano seismologist who worked  for decades at the USGS in Menlo Park and pioneered the science of volcanic predictions for certain kinds of volcanoes.  I had written the book proposal consisting only of the Prologue and […]

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Texas is big and my house is not. Nevertheless, my heat pump had a hard time finding enough heat to pump, when the outside temperature dropped to 10 last February. The fan spun, flinging off icicles, and the compressor labored. The machine could barely hold the inside temperature to whatever I had the thermostat set […]

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Many of us are familiar with some of the great things Mitch Daniels is doing as president of Purdue University including not raising tuition for a decade ( Press Release from Purdue ) or standing up for free speech on campus ( Mitch Daniels on Free Speech on Campus ) but many are not aware that […]

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Last March, I posted the Prologue to an autobiography of my friend, Bernard Chouet, a volcano seismologist who worked  for decades at the USGS in Menlo Park and pioneered the science of volcanic predictions for certain kinds of volcanoes. You may have seen the Nova episode on his work. (He is now retired in his […]

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Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with precision medicine expert Hannah Mamuszka and Pioneer Institute’s Bill Smith about the promises and pitfalls of the newly approved Alzheimer’s drug Aduhelm, and the challenges presented when new, expensive drugs of dubious benefit are introduced to the nation’s formulary.

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Something incredible happens when teamwork happens the way it’s supposed to happen. Ultimately, when everyone on your team is equally invested in the overall purpose and goal, the performance and success of the project(s) skyrocket. You have each other’s backs, work faster, find and fix mistakes more easily, and innovate more.  Preview Open

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I am, still, wondering about the $737.45 I’d given Cabo Verde Airlines. That was for a trip scheduled for March 2020. You know the rest. I knew my flight, as well as all proposed alternate flights, had been cancelled. I had forgotten, and recalled only after reviewing old e-mails, that Cabo Verde Airlines had agreed […]

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This week on JobMakers, Guest Host Jo Napolitano talks with Josh Feast, the CEO and Co-Founder of Cogito, a Boston-based software company that deploys Artificial Intelligence (AI) to help employers in a wide variety of industries improve their customer service call centers. Josh got his start creating innovative technology to improve case management for a social services agency in New Zealand, before coming to America on a Fulbright scholarship to earn an MBA at MIT Sloan. In this episode, they discuss the many applications of Artificial Intelligence, how it helps provide emotional intelligence to augment management practices at large organizations, and how to address some of the concerns about privacy and bias that have been raised around its use.

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Dr. Farouk El-Baz, retired research professor and director of the Center for Remote Sensing at Boston University. They discuss his remarkable, varied, and pioneering career in the sciences, surveying both the heavens and the Earth, and key teachers and scientists who have influenced him. Dr. El-Baz shares what it was like serving as supervisor of Lunar Science Planning for NASA’s Apollo program, and working on the world-changing project of putting a human on the Moon. He describes what the Apollo program needed to know beforehand to map the Moon in order to select the landing site, and the key scientific facts about the Moon that NASA needed to gather to ensure the mission’s ultimate success.

In the second phase of his career in science, Dr. El Baz used remote sensing and space images to explore for groundwater in the largest deserts on Earth. He explains how surveying the Moon informed this work, and the most significant and surprising discoveries he has made with remote sensing. Lastly, they talk about the mathematical and scientific background knowledge that best prepares students for careers in STEM fields.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with author and former New York Times science journalist Nicholas Wade about his recent article in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists on the possible origins of the SARS2 virus that caused the COVID-19 pandemic. In their conversation, they consider the possibility that, absent finding evidence of a natural jump from animals, the SARS2 virus may have come from a lab.

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It’s Still Warp Five for the mRNA Vaccines

 

Star Trek: The Next Generation Warp on Make a GIF

Let’s start with the good, shall we? Like Captain Picard’s Enterprise going to warp, this newfangled mRNA vaccination stuff is pretty cool, and there’s a lot of potential for good stuff to happen in the future. Did I correctly hear Rob Long saying that we might get a malaria vaccine with this tech?  That’s terrific!  And have you looked up Israel lately on Worldometers and checked the updated vaccination rates?

The mRNA approach has the best immunity.  And it’s working.  These things are saving lives.  You can also check the rates in other places like the USA, UK, and UAE, and see coronavirus numbers going down as vaccination numbers go up.  (Hong Kong, for another example, lags behind those other places, but the same trend is there.)

About Those UFOs. I Have a Theory.

 

One night in the spring of 1980, shortly before midnight, I left my dorm room at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro, New Mexico, got in my pale blue 1972 VW Super Beetle, and drove west into the desert toward the tiny town of Magdalena. Magdalena, population 900 or so, isn’t precisely the middle of nowhere. The middle of nowhere, and my destination, was about 20 miles further west, in the high desert basin known as the Plains of San Augustin. The 1947 “Roswell Incident,” much featured in UFO mythology, purportedly occurred on that isolated plain, but that isn’t what drew me there that clear moonlit night.

The Very Large Array (VLA) is a group of 27 radio telescopes spread out in an enormous Y on the Plains of San Augustin. The dishes, weighing more than 200 tons each on their multi-story gantries, can be moved by rail to vary the size of the Y, the legs of which can be more than 20 miles long at their greatest extent. Using a technique known as interferometry, the array can achieve, in some instances, the resolving power of a single dish with a diameter equivalent to the span of the array.

Host Joe Selvaggi talks with cyber security expert Dr. Brandon Valeriano about the Colonial Pipeline shutdown and our national exposure to cyberattack on vital infrastructure.

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