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It was my intention to post a picture of myself in a helicopter, flying it solo. But that hasn’t happened, and it may not happen anytime soon. I have learned that while a certain amount of soloing is ordinarily required before a student pilot can take his checkride, this is not (or no longer) the […]

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No, not 2020. This study says 536 was the worst year ever. Global climate change was unbearable. A volcano blotted out the sun and brought summertime snow to China. My question is, if it happens next month, what could we do to mitigate the problems? People have played this game with global warming: “how could […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Archie McPhee Odd Candy Taste Test

 

This last Sunday, Eustace C. Scrubb posted about his foray into the strange world of Archie McPhee. He posted several rather odd flavors of candy cane that one can find at Archie McPhee. Now, I have long been a connoisseur of Archie McPhee’s fine offerings of useless crap and odd foods. I once gave my brother a yodeling pickle (wearing lederhosen, no less) from Archie McPhee.¹ It is a place where one will not find items in good taste. Occasionally, they do offer things that taste good, but kale-flavored candy canes may not be in that category.

Still, I am a man of adventure. I decided to take the challenge and try some of the offerings. Most of the flavors of candy canes also come as hard candies in tins. This offers several advantages, but the main one is that they are individually-wrapped, bite-sized pieces. Candy canes, even for a mouth the size of mine, do not tend to be bite-sized. I ordered five flavors of their candies.

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I like to think that we’ll be allowed to: that Wu’Flumania was so embarrassing there will be no urge to relive it. But I’m probably wrong, once again. More likely, Wu’Flumania will become legend, because the sacrifices were too great to ignore and they must have been heroic and wise because the alternative – admitting […]

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Fascinating video regarding the future of the earth, our solar system and the entire universe. Seven billion years from now, as the sun undergoes super expansion, the earth will be consumed.Or so it is explained in this video that compresses the major happenings from 2019 to the End of Time into a quick 30 minutes. […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Does Techno-Optimism Have a Place in US politics?

 

The Alphabet Inc. campus, also known as Googleplex, Mountain View, CA.
Nuclear war theorist Herman Kahn provided at least partial inspiration for film director Stanley Kubrick’s maniacal Dr. Strangelove. (The character’s accent, at least, was likely based on that of German emigres Henry Kissinger or Wehrner Von Braun.) Kubrick had read Kahn’s 1960 treatise “On Thermonuclear War” and met with him several times when planning the 1964 black comedy. That unforgettable cinematic depiction and interpretation of Khan-ism — a nuclear conflict between the US and USSR was not “unthinkable” — if not necessarily the man himself, helped cement Kahn’s historical reputation as a dangerous Cold Warrior.

But the 1970s detente era saw the second act of Kahn’s career, that of a futurist. At the very time the professional long-term forecasting industry was taking a pessimistic turn fueled by environmental catastrophism, this thinker of dark, unthinkable thoughts stood out as a sunny purveyor of techno-capitalist optimism. Rather than a few minutes before nuclear midnight, dawn was always just breaking in a world of abundance led by a recharged Reaganite America, a view he distilled in his 1983 book, “The Coming Boom.” (Liberals were dismissive and, it turns out, wrong. The period from 1983 through 2007 has been called The Long Boom because of its strong and steady economic growth. It was also the period that saw the rise of Silicon Valley as the nation’s and world’s tech core.)

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

The hop this evening was amazing. A great wide angle view of the whole SN05 #Starship prototype flight from @LabPadre's sapphire camera (+ audio) Read More View Post

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Triumph of the Private Sector in Space

 

Two astronauts in their Crew Dragon capsule (made by SpaceX) successfully returned from the International Space Station, gently splashing down in the Gulf of Mexico, at 2:48 p.m. Sunday. This was a historic mission, and went flawlessly. The capsule was recovered by a SpaceX ship in about an hour and a half. The astronauts got to the ISS powered by a SpaceX Falcon9 rocket in late May.

Cheer for the spirit of Free Markets and Free People!

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Dava Sobel, a former New York Times science reporter, and author of Longitude, Galileo’s Daughter, and Letters to Father. Dava describes what inspired her interest in some of the most gifted mathematicians and astronomers in history, including Copernicus and Galileo, and the tensions between religion and science. She discusses the life story of a woman previously hidden from history, Sister Maria Celeste, who was Galileo’s daughter. Dava also offers some key lessons from her book, The Glass Universe, about the women who worked at the Harvard College Observatory in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. She concludes by reading her favorite letter from Sister Maria Celeste to Galileo.

Stories of the Week: State and local education officials from across the country are seeking waivers from standardized testing for the upcoming school year. Should the U.S. Department of Education grant them? As we mark the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, a new report reveals that nearly two-thirds of U.S. public schools contain physical barriers, such as inaccessible door handles and steep ramps, that potentially block access for individuals with disabilities. Are we doing enough to provide options for students with diverse learning needs?

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This is a wonderful, though long, discussion of the Apollo program celebrating the 20th anniversary of Apollo 11. https://youtu.be/x4zGwqx-RzI Read More View Post

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. My Two Days as a DV (Distinguished Visitor)

 

Four years ago in February, I found out that my book “GPS Declassified” had been named as recommended reading in the 2016 National Security Space Institute professional reading list. They invited my co-author and me to come out in July and address their classes. Then the commander of Air Force Space Command, Gen John Hyten (now Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff) got us invited to address his staff and other military people. We flew to Denver and then drove to Colorado Springs on July 20th. I had difficulty sleeping due to the altitude but got through the next day on adrenaline. AFSC was at Peterson AFB. 2SOPS, where they control GPS, is just east at Schriever AFB. You go through the base security and then there’s another layer for 2SOPS. We met with senior people and talked about GPS for about an hour. Then we got a tour of 2SOPS. Even if was a bit of a dog and pony story, I still found the people there very impressive. The GPS satellites have individual characteristics and they adjust the constellations to optimize performance.

In the afternoon, there was the big show. We met Gen Hyten at 2:45 and then spoke for an hour. Thirty minutes were allotted for Q&A. We were told that at 4:30 all would rise and Gen Hyten would leave. Staff commented that it was rare for him to spend 90 minutes on one thing. 4:30 came and he said, “You all can leave. I’m staying.” People told me later that that had never happened before. Dang, we didn’t do too badly.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A Measured Look at Climate Alarmism: Apocalypse Never

 

Michael Shellenberger is a dedicated environmentalist. He was a progressive political activist for years. He wants a cleaner, greener world. That is why he opposes the Green New Deal. Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All, by Michael Shellenberger explains his position.

Shellenberger opens the book by picking apart and demolishing the arguments of those who claim apocalyptic climate change, leading to the death of billions, lies in our near future. He shows predictions of billions of deaths cannot be supported from IPCC report results. He shows how alarmists deliberately distorted facts – sometimes even making false claims about the reports – to justify their predictions.

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Does anything just bump into and eat a virus? Yes. Platelets do this, or can, if the virus’s surface shows certain features, certain patterns. I did not know until very recently that platelets were at all capable of this – I thought they were all about blood clotting – but it is not totally surprising […]

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Join Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer Institute co-host Bill Smith as they talk with Harvard Medical School’s Dr. Ed Nardell about his scientific observations on how the novel coronavirus is spread and what can be done to make our schools, buildings, and lives in public safer.

Guest:

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I keep forgetting that magazines exist, and that I even subscribe to some. A while ago I got an e-mail from Cornell University praising me for my two gifts, and as this robotic message was – uniquely in my experience – one I could respond to, I did. I said I had never given Cornell […]

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What’s your bottom-ranking memory of AIDS hysteria? They should all be tied for last but here is one that for me anyway manages to stay just above the crowd: a story in the Brazilian newsmagazine VEJA about Ayds. The diet candy/drug. I’d forgotten about it, having only ever seen it advertised in American magazines years […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Reuben Bratwurst (or Why my Mouf is ’Appy)

 

A few years back, a little fast food place opened here north of Detroit, Michigan. It was called Loaded Links. Basically, it was a high-end hot-dog and circus food place. They had all sorts of options on the menu. For instance, there was the Millionaire’s Dog, which had a Wagyu steak dog with fois gras and truffle sauce. They also had menu items with names like Windy City Dog or New York-Style, etc. I went through trying all of the variations. My wife had been getting the Reuben Dog with a few small alterations. I believe it normally came with an all-beef hot dog, and she would substitute a Polish sausage, instead. She would also get it without pastrami. Now, I thought pastrami was kind of an odd innovation. Corned beef, yes. Pastrami? Eh. So, I didn’t try the Reuben Dog until we had been there at least ten times. And I was very pleasantly surprised. It was without a doubt the best thing on their menu. A week later, I was jonesing for that Reuben Dog. We headed over there, and…they were closed. They had a note saying that they were moving and would be at a new location in the spring. And then CoViD-19 appeared. Loaded Links has not yet reappeared if it will. And I’ve been jonesing for another Reuben Dog.

Oh, I have had Reubens since then. Given my conditions, they have to be naked, no bread. Likewise, Loaded Links had an option to serve the hot dogs in a gluten-free corn tortilla, which is how I had been eating them there. But those naked Reubens weren’t quite the same.