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Pet adoptions or ownership in the United States grew somewhere upwards of 10% during 2020, especially during the pandemic. No surprise there. And pet ownership is huge: 85 million American households have at least one pet, some 67% of homes. Some 13% of people became first-time pet owners in 2020. Among those who adopted a […]

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A Country Serenade

 

While people may argue about their tastes in music, it is hard to argue that Country music does not rule the current roost when it comes to story-telling.  While pop music may attempt to be clever, country is up-front and brash. Increasingly produced and polished, country fans all look for heart-wrenching lyrics; even the menfolk.  Even the upbeat songs often have a melancholy core.  It is a beautiful trait of country music that goes way back when it moved away from folk.

We pay homage to the greats: Dolly, Johnny, Willie.  Different varieties of country, but the greats stand together in their times.  Patsy. Hank. Reba. Loretta…. the litany is long and a tribute to our common American experience.

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From “Federal Judge Overturns CDC’s Eviction Moratorium ” at Zerohedge: “D.C. District Judge Dabney Friedrich ruled on the side of the plaintiffs, who alleged that the CDC overstepped its authority by extending the eviction moratorium — which was first included in the March CARES Act passed by Congress — to all residential properties nationwide. Preview […]

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In The Opposing Self (1955) Lionel Trilling has the following to say about Jane Austen in his essay on Mansfield Park. Once again one must marvel at the prescience of a great artist-observer: It was Jane Austen who first represented the specifically modern personality and the culture in which it had its being. Never before […]

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Montana Journal Entry: May 12, 2008. My daughter A. was six and made Mother’s Day memorable for me–but not in the way she expected.  It dawned on me how much A. delighted in celebrations of any sort when she was a chubby toddler, not two yet. We were at a friend’s birthday party and the […]

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https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2021/05/aldous_huxley_foresaw_our_despots__fauci_gates_and_their_vaccine_crusaders.html “Within the next generation I believe that the world’s rulers will discover that infant conditioning and narco-hypnosis are more efficient, as instruments of government, than clubs and prisons, and that the lust for power can be just as completely satisfied by suggesting people into loving their servitude as by flogging and kicking them into […]

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Caitlyn Jenner’s Run at Newsom

 

Yesterday, former reality star and athlete Caitlyn Jenner (born Bruce Jenner) announced her candidacy for Governor of California, thanks to a recall effort aimed at current Governor Gavin Newsom. Jenner is working with a team of former Trump communications strategists, and it appears Brad Parscale helped produce this breathtaking first advertisement announcing her candidacy:

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https://market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=241875 The facts are that Covid-19 basically burned itself out before the first shot went in the first arm and that none of the mitigating factors prevented net deaths from occurring; in fact all these mitigations, from mask orders to lockdowns to closing businesses and others caused more deaths due to ODs, suicides, avoidable heart attacks and strokes not screened for and […]

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May the Fourth

 

Disclaimer, before I even start:

I dread the first few weeks of May.  Every. Single. Year.  It’s one of those stretches of awful memory that many of us have at different times of the year, when it seems that regrets/trauma/cataclysm all pile on top of one another to render certain times insupportable and sometimes just plain unbearable.  To wit:

  • May 2–the anniversary of my stepson Michael’s death.
  • May 10–the late Mr. She’s birthday
  • May 13–my late mother-in-law’s birthday.  She who died from a medication error, having been given the set of pills which should have been allocated to the lady in the next bed of the nursing home where my mother-in-law spent her final days
  • May 17–my late father-in-law’s birthday.  A man who, by all accounts was one of the smartest and most generous men you’d ever know, but who, in my own experience, was an awful, nasty, abusive, destructive, drunk
  • Mother’s Day–a day in which my small family celebrates the Mums and Moms we have known, every single one of whom died in traumatic and ugly circumstances–from the medication error mentioned above (mother-in-law), or from a fall head-first down the stairs, and a traumatic brain injury (Mr. She’s first wife and the mother of his three children), or from lifelong undiagnosed mental difficulties and eventual fronto-temporal dementia (my own mother)
  • And a time of year when I began to inkle that a dear, if non-familial, friendship might be lost to me forever, and that I, who didn’t break it, couldn’t fix it.

And yet.  And yet…

Shall We Wake the President?

 

Our governor, Ron DeSantis, has lifted all governmentally directed Corona-related restrictions, effective immediately.

This analysis in Forbes magazine is one of the fairest I could find, as a number of those appearing this morning are so full of snark and sniffery it is difficult to get through them. My, how they do hate our governor—they must see him as an existential threat on the order of President Trump, only more threatening at age 42 with a long and vigorous and energetic future before him.

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I like how Christianity redirects humanity’s innate religious impulses towards mostly good purposes. But I rather wish that people didn’t have such religious impulses in the first place because they are so corrupt and irrational. I genuinely don’t understand this mindset but it dominates my fellow apespawn. Preview Open

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Great Character Actors: Jack Carson

 

A couple of years ago, I wrote a post here about one of my favorite character actors, Ward Bond. I think it’s time to write a little about another of the great character actors that being Jack Carson. Like Bond, I don’t know much more about Carson’s life than that presented in his Wikipedia biography.

Carson was born in the province of Manitoba in Canada in 1910. His father was a successful insurance executive and the family moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin when he was three or four years old. As such, he always considered Milwaukee his hometown and he was eventually naturalized as a U.S. citizen as an adult. His older brother, Robert, also pursued an acting career although with much less success.