This week The Learning Curve podcast marks International Holocaust Remembrance Day with guest host Dr. Jay Greene of the Heritage Foundation and Laurence Rees, a former head of BBC TV History Programmes; founder, writer, and producer of the award-winning WW2History.com; and author of The Holocaust: A New History. Mr. Rees sheds light on the historical context of Germany in the 1920s and 1930s, including the rise of the cultural and political conditions that led to the Holocaust. Rees discusses how the Nazis promulgated their anti-Semitic ideology and laws, and underscores the criminal realities of the Auschwitz concentration and death camp, as well as the Holocaust’s six million Jewish victims. Rees also talks about the fragility of both human life and political and cultural institutions. Mr. Rees closes the interview with a reading from his book on the Holocaust.

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Note to voters: vote for someone who got his geographical and political ideas from the Earth and its population themselves. Not from maps. Maps mess with people’s minds! And you can’t always tell how they’re going to do that. True, nobody over age 7 looks at the Mercator projection and concludes that world domination depends […]

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Jim and Greg discuss House Speaker Kevin McCarthy rejecting Reps. Adam Schiff and Eric Swalwell for the House Intelligence Committee, with Jim explaining why the move is good politics and good policy. They also groan as Rep. George Santos criticizes comedians and other politicians for making fun of his serial mendacity. And as former Vice President Mike Pence admits having classified documents, they wonder just how many of our top officials are careless with sensitive materials.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Michael McCaul’s vow to get answers on the Biden administration’s debacle in Afghanistan. McCaul says the administration has been stonewalling on providing documents on how U.S. intelligence was so wrong on the advance of the Taliban, the deadly attack on U.S. service members outside the Kabul airport, and much more. They also shudder as a new report shows the U.S. is dangerously deficient in producing new weapons to replace the many munitions we’re sending over to Ukraine. In other words, if the U.S. got involved in sustained military action, we could run out of key weapons in less than a week. Finally, they shake their heads as Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s solution to the wave of street vendor robberies is to tell them not to conduct business in cash.

Join Jim and Greg as they consider whether Republicans have a better shot at winning a U.S. Senate seat in Arizona now that liberal Rep. Ruben Gallego announced he is seeking the Democratic nomination in order to run against Sen. Kyrsten Sinema – who was a Democrat and is now an independent.  Can the GOP take advantage of a three-way race? They also welcome the news that White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain will be leaving soon after steering the Biden administration far to the left on many issues and then unconvincingly trying to spin us on the consequences of that approach. Finally, Jim breaks down the impasse on the Pentagon opposing sending M1A1 Abrams tanks to Ukraine and Germany refusing to send tanks unless we do.

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OK, OK, he didn’t really. What he really said, during a press conference in Ukraine a couple of days ago, was this: “If Putin gets away with this, there goes Taiwan. If Putin’s successful in Ukraine and is not prosecuted under international law, everything we’ve said since World War II becomes a joke. He will […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they cringe at reports that December’s illegal border crossings will hit a record high and possibly reach 250,000, and Jim wonders why the numbers keep coming out later and later. They also shake their heads as White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre keeps dodging questions about the Biden classified documents or referring people to sources she knows won’t say anything. Finally, they marvel as Biden climate envoy John Kerry publicly hails himself and others in a “select group of human beings” who are in position to “save the planet.”

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Bicycling through the town of Bee Cave, Texas put me in mind of Richard Brautigan and therefore of São Tomé. Maybe I should revisit the latter, and see if I can find the book by the former. In 2003 I’d met someone on that two-island microarchipelago who asked for all sorts of things – I […]

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Summary

The Center’s Senior National Security Fellow, Todd Bensman, traveled to Mexico to investigate rumors about a shelter in Tijuana serving only Muslim migrants and about thousands of illegal immigrants being funneled into the United States through ports of entry under a questionable program that makes border crossing legal. His trip took him to Tijuana and Mexicali.

Given the large number of “special interest aliens” (SIAs), U.S.-bound immigrants from countries where Islamic terrorist groups operate, on the FBI terrorism watch list, Bensman wondered about the national security implications of Mexico’s first Muslim immigrant shelter, which shelters mostly SIAs. He visited the shelter and conducted the first interview of its director, who has never been contacted by American officials, about the sensitive national security issues the operation raises for the United States.

Happy New Year!  Jim and Greg start the new year by closing out the awards season for last year. Today, they give our their prestigious choices for Person of the Year, with Jim focusing on the midterm elections and Greg thinking about a moment that took almost 50 years to come. Then they reveal their selections for Turncoat of the Year, as Jim zeroes in on presidential politics and Greg goes with people in government doing the exact opposite of their job description.  Finally, they offer up predictions for 2023. One of them is optimistic and one of them most certainly is not.

Thanks for listening! Our usual 3 Martini Lunch format returns on Tuesday.

It’s media day in our year-end Three Martini Lunch awards and Jim and Greg have plenty to say about how things were covered – if they were covered at all.  Specifically, they look at the stories the mainstream media covered far too much, the ones they conveniently ignored because they didn’t fit their narrative, and they highlight what they saw as the best stories of 2022.

More year-end awards today!  Jim and Greg embark on the second half of their six-episode saga known as the 2022 Three Martini Lunch Awards. Today, they offer up their selections for the best political idea, worst political idea, and boldest political tactics for the year. Their selections range from the campaign trail to the halls of Congress to the biggest land war in Europe in more than 75 years.

Ukraine News at Christmas Time

 

I’ve been away from the news for two days for a family Christmas. No following the news, just time with my son and his family. They only live about ten miles away, but my wife and I packed the presents, and we were house guests.

On Christmas Eve, we prepared a smoked salmon fettuccine dinner. We enjoyed some champagne, and some adult libations in the late evening hours. We helped the two grandsons prepare cookies and milk for Santa and sent them off to bed.

Jim and Greg are back for the third round of their prestigious Three Martini Lunch Awards. Today, they discuss the biggest lies of 2022, with Jim focusing on our economy and Greg opting for an infuriating falsehood connected to our elections. Then, they reveal their choices for the best and worst political theater of 2022.

Joe Selvaggi talks with Todd Bensman, senior fellow at the Center For Immigration Studies, about the conditions for aspiring immigrants and border security officials at the U.S.-Mexico border and the likely effects of the expiration of Title 42, a policy that had denied asylum claims during Covid-19.

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Join Jim and Greg as they offer the second installment of their highly coveted year-end awards. Today they remark on the people connected to politics that they’re most sorry to see pass away in 2022. They also share their choices for rising political stars and the political figures who appear to be fading into oblivion – rarely to be heard from again.

As we approach the end of this year, it’s time to start deciding the best and worst of 2022. Today, Jim and Greg begin handing out the their prestigious Three Martini Lunch Awards. In this first installment, they offer their individual selections for Most Overrated Political Figure, Most Underrated Political Figure, and Most Honest Political Figure.

Jim and Greg wade into the sharp debate on the right over how to approach Ukraine, Zelensky, and their war against Russia. Their biggest frustration is the accusations being lobbed from both sides at anyone who shows the slightest bit of nuance on the issue. They also hammer Republicans for going along with tons of earmarks in the new omnibus bill – wasting countless more taxpayer dollars on frivolous projects. And they react to the Florida GOP pushing for the ouster of Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel and wonder why so many RNC committee members are so loyal to a leader with a pretty dismal electoral record.

This year, Christmas finds Ricochet’s own Dave Carter enjoying life in Florida while savoring the memories of holidays on the bayou in his home state of Louisiana. Whether it’s childhood memories with his grandparents and great grandparents at Christmas, or stories of life in uniform, life on the road, or life in retail, Dave brings you center stage where you will experience events with him.

Roman Genn, whose extraordinary art regularly graces the covers of National Review, along with the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, the Library of Congress and the White House (to name only a few), joins Dave for a conversation that spans the globe. Born in Moscow, Roman’s political cartoons achieved a level of notoriety in the Soviet Union that resulted in his needing to leave the Workers’ Paradise and move to the United States in 1991. Informed by the perspectives of one who witnessed the machinations of a totalitarian state up close and personal, Roman has some thoughts to share on the Russian invasion of Ukraine that you may find arresting to say the least.  Oh yes, and you won’t want to miss Roman’s description of Christmas in Soviet Russia.