We hope you had a wonderful Christmas and we’re glad to have you back as we return to our prestigious Three Martini Lunch Awards. Today, Jim and Greg discuss the worst scandals of 2020, which Jim choosing an international mess and Greg opting for a domestic one. Next, we sift through a ton of possibilities for the best and worst political theater of 2020.

Join Jim and Greg as they fume over the obscene process by which Congress shoveled a lot of wasteful spending into the combined omnibus and COVID relief spending bill that will do some good for small businesses. But while disgusted with the process, they are excited about the doubled tax deduction for three martini lunches! And they address comments from Die Hard director John McTiernan that the film is anti-capitalist, but they just might veer off into other aspects of this cinematic masterpiece.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the effort from House Republicans to kick California Rep. Eric Swalwell off the House Intelligence Committee. They also welcome AOC saying Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer should no longer be leaders but she gives a surprisingly interesting answer for why they still are in charge. And Jim and Greg fire back at critics whining that the nations that developed the coronavirus vaccines get to use it first.

Heather Zumarraga, President of Zuma Global and the author of The Man’s Guide to Corporate Culture joins Carol Roth to discuss the new reality for being a man (or a woman) in the workplace, and how to navigate it. From dating to other secret “rules”, Heather shares the ways that you can ensure to keep yourself out of trouble, avoid reputational damage and still be able to mentor colleagues. 

Plus, a “Now You Know” segment on fashion indicators in the stock market.

Join Jim and Greg as they applaud Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for cranking out as many judicial confirmations as possible before the end of the session. They also discuss the truly crazy comments of Georgia Senate hopefuls Rev. Warnock comparing the GOP tax cuts to Herod’s slaughter of babies in Bethlehem and Jon Ossoff being clueless on the job of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. And they shake their heads as officials in Austin, Texas, finally realize that shutting down and defunding the police cadet academy was probably a bad idea.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the first supplies of the new Pfizer coronavirus vaccine being shipped out to inoculate medical personnel and vulnerable citizens. They also get a kick out of CNN and American Urban Radio Networks reporter April Ryan being horrified that someone secretly recorded and leaked a conversation with Joe Biden and then seriously agreeing with another reporter who mockingly suggested that the media should only report things that come from the Biden team. And they discuss the sexual harassment allegations made against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo by his former aide and how the media are instantly demanding proof when the accused is a Democrat.

Nasdaq’s Diversity Distraction

 

This past week, Nasdaq announced that it had applied to the Securities and Exchange Commission for authorization to impose diversity requirements on the boards of directors of its listed companies. The substantive proposal requires that each company include on its board at least two diverse directors, one of whom must be a woman (or, more precisely, one who self-identifies as female) and one who self-identifies as a member of an underrepresented minority, including “Black or African American, Hispanic or Latinx, Asian, Native American or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, two or more races or ethnicities,” or as “LGBTQ+.” Whenever these targets are not met, the listed company must offer a public explanation as to why that is the case. At no point does Nasdaq offer specific instances of intentional discrimination against members of these preferred groups.

In its SEC application, Nasdaq writes as if the new policy is all gain and no pain. It reports that its proposal has strong support from many of its member companies, a large fraction of which have already adopted similar diversity policies. For instance, a Deloitte study cited in the application notes that a majority of public and private companies surveyed have either already reviewed “their board composition, recruiting, and succession practices” to fight “racial inequality and inequity,” or intend to do so. Nasdaq cites further studies that find that companies with diverse boards have consistently higher returns on investments than those companies that ignore diversity. It thus concludes that the “benefits to stakeholders of increased diversity are becoming more apparent and include an increased variety of fresh perspectives, improved decision making and oversight, and strengthened internal controls.”

Yet, Nasdaq simultaneously laments the relatively slow rate of increase in board diversity among its member companies, noting that “the US still lags behind other jurisdictions that have imposed requirements related to board diversity.” It also asserts, without demonstrating, that if “companies recruit by skill set and expertise rather than title, they will find there is more than enough diverse talent to satisfy demand.” Nasdaq then reverses field by allowing a listed company to disclose that it does not meet the rule because it is bound by some alternative legal standard under state or federal law, or because it “has a board philosophy regarding diversity that differs from the diversity objectives set forth” in the Nasdaq rule.

Member Post

 

My company designs and builds vaccine refrigerators for the off-grid medical clinic market in Africa. Many of the materials we use to make these medical fridges are imported from China. These materials are shipped to the US, assembled into products, and reshipped to Africa. I have competitors in China and Europe. I’m already struggling to […]

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Don’t Blame Restaurants for Covid Spread

 

Last week, I sat with a new potential restaurant client, six feet apart and fully masked, of course. Let’s call her Viola.

Viola told me her story. She and her husband are both non-citizens, with a strong entrepreneurial spirit—and they opened a small restaurant a few years ago in Scottsdale, AZ. It’s in a hard-to-find location that is, however, usually found by tourists from all over the US and Canada in the booming tourism season in the Desert Southwest.

Enter 2020. Viola told me how they had finally picked up traction in their tiny spot; she shared stories of her regular customers, expanding hours, wine dinners, and more. They were so confident and excited, that she purchased a building to expand into with a new concept that would eventually also house her existing restaurant. That all happened in January.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that Moderna’s new coronavirus vaccine is nearly 95 percent effective. They also look at the Georgia runoffs, hos history is on the GOP’s side, and how the opposition research on Rev. Warnock is now flowing freely. And they react to Georgia Democrats assuming Stacey Abrams will run for governor again in 2022.

Join Jim and Greg as they relish Democrats likely having such a tight majority in the House that it will be tough for many to accept jobs in the executive branch because the vacancies could make it tough for Democrats to get much legislation done. They also hammer musician John Legend for suggesting you’ll do more good donating to Democrats running for U.S. Senate in Georgia than giving to your local food bank. And they update the infighting among Democrats by discussing the latest salvos from Joe Manchin and AOC.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss why it’s so critical for Republicans to win one – or preferably both – of the Georgia Senate races and Louisiana Sen. John Kennedy also distills it very well. They also recoil as Ticketmaster plans to force concertgoers to prove they’ve been vaccinated or tested negative just prior to the event. And they hammer New York Times columnist Tom Friedman for urging Democrats to move to Georgia in order to help the party win the Senate races there.

I’m Not Renewing My Consumer Reports Subscription

 

I’ve been getting Consumer Reports (CR) for maybe 30 years. Over that time I’ve used it to research all kinds of consumer purchases from cars to appliances, TVs, headphones, computers, tires, luggage, tools, electric razors, you name it. A few years ago I began to notice a shift in the type of items CR covered. Instead of concentrating on basic consumer purchases, they started getting more into “issues.” Some examples just from the past year include:

“Whole Wheat, Soba, Legume Noodles: Which Are Healthiest?”

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine that is reportedly more than 90 percent effective with no discernible side effects. They also hammer New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo for whining about the vaccine being ready before Biden is president. And they react to out-of-touch liberal Chuck Schumer claiming that if Democrats win a Senate majority because of the races in Georgia, then they will change America and the world.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome CNN’s Wolf Blitzer getting a reality check on police work. They also shudder as the far left starts lining up for cabinet spots in a possible Biden administration. And as the Girl Scouts delete an innocuous tweet congratulating Amy Coney Barrett because of complaints from lefties, Jim implores Americans to stand up for themselves and tell the mob to go pound sand.

Join Jim and Greg as they they cheer massive economic growth in the third quarter. They also discuss the ‘anonymous’ bombshell turning into a dud and how it further erodes media credibility. And they react to Kanye West polling in third place in one battleground state.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss how the final debate was much more pleasant to watch and far more substantive than the first one. They also dissect Joe Biden’s many lies in the debate – from saying he never promised to ban fracking to suggesting that the Hunter Biden laptop story is just Russian disinformation to inexplicably contending no one lost their private health insurance plans because of Obamacare. And they appreciate many lefties revealing just how little they know about immigration policy by misunderstanding and mocking Trump’s reference to “coyotes” smuggling kids across the border.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss Joe Biden now promising to create a bipartisan commission to study reforming the courts and Jim explains why he thinks this is Biden’s way of letting the idea die. They also weigh in on Sacha Baron Cohen’s attempt to portray Rudy Giuliani as acting lewd with a minor and how Rudy could probably use better judgment. And they take a long look at the growing scandal involving Joe and Hunter Biden’s business dealings and why this is a big problem for Biden even if he wins the election.

Ep. 261 – @10:29 Judge Jeanine Pirro on Spygate, Biden’s Russia Problem and the Vote-By-Mail. At @23:22 Jonathan Williams, Chief Economist and Executive Vice President at http://ALEC.org on the best and worst states economically.

First, Dave’s recap on the VP Debate and Biden’s ‘Kamala Problem’.