Join Jim and Greg as they cheer Texas lawmakers or advancing legislation on several key conservative priorities. They also discuss the cyber attack that shut down a key fuel pipeline to the eastern U.S. They break down the latest scandal engulfing New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. And they remember the wit and conservative wisdom of the late Pete du Pont.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome two more states making progress on election integrity. They also cringe at the April jobs report coming in way below expectations. And they react to Democrats and activists using the absurd, supposedly inclusive term of “birthing people” instead of mothers.

Join Jim and Greg as they get a kick out of President Biden celebrating a very meager goal in getting kids back in the classroom.  They also fume as Biden sides with the WHO in wanting to “pause” the patents for the companies that developed the vaccines in order to boost production. And they react to Democrats debating whether to remove Iowa and New Hampshire as the first caucus and primary states because they’re too white.

The entrepreneurial spirit among immigrants and refugees allows them the flexibility to pursue unexpected courses of action, adapt, accept risk and make the most of opportunities they didn’t even know of before. For Dr. Amar Sawhney from India, that started at the University of Texas at Austin with 30 job rejections out of 30 applications. But he charted a path that would see him go in directions hitherto unknown to him: getting a PhD, helping found a company, journeying to Boston, and starting a string of new companies, using his chemical engineering background to save lives through remarkable local therapy innovations. To date, he has founded eight companies accounting for 4,000 jobs and more than $2 billion in revenue. He’s been named a “Champion of Change” by The White House, one of the “five most innovative Medical Device CEOs” by MassDevice, the EY regional entrepreneur of the year, The Immigrant Learning Center’s own Immigrant Entrepreneur Awardee for Life Science Business. But his influence extends well beyond that space into environmental conservationism, safeguarding refugees, mentoring and promoting STEM education, and building public understanding of America’s Sikhs, as you’ll hear in this week’s episode of JobMakers.

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Carol Roth gives you a preview of her upcoming book, The War on Small Business (available for pre-order now) and why the challenges to economic freedom transcend just the backbone of the economy. While the COVID pandemic gave the government the opportunity to attack small businesses and consolidate power, the groundwork has been set forth for decades. Carol talks about everything from the transfer of wealth abetted by the Federal Reserve to the exportation of capitalism to China in exchange for more central planning in the US and why it is threatening our individual rights and economy.

Plus, a “Now You Know” on the origins of “shirt loops”.

Join Jim and Greg as they dissect President Biden’s attempt to put a fresh coat of paint on the same old agenda Democrats have been pushing for decades, including his push for massive tax hikes and insistence that his gun control agenda is compliant with the second amendment. They also cheer Tim Scott for a terrific GOP response, in which he blew up several false narratives from Democrats and pushed for critical items like school choice. And they hammer media outlets of both political persuasions for publishing stories that didn’t have all the facts right and for catering to favored politicians.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Max Faingezicht, an immigrant who founded ThriveHive, a marketing software company for small businesses, and Telescoped, which uses remote software engineering to connect Latin American engineers with U.S. companies in need of their skills. The entrepreneurial ecosystem of Boston and Cambridge have allowed Max to achieve dreams he didn’t even know he had when he arrived. He can now foster entrepreneurship in his home country of Costa Rica while bringing much-needed talent to U.S. companies, all the while influencing what the future of work will look like. In this episode, he shares his fascinating immigration story, as well as his ideas on where workers go next.

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This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Hilda Torres, an immigrant from Mexico who runs My Little Best Friends Early Learning Center in Malden, Massachusetts. One of the most successful businesses in the city, the center enrolls over 100 students whose parents come from more than 25 different countries. In this episode, Hilda shares how she used the tools of education, and her own grit and determination, to make her mark in the land of opportunity.

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Immigrants have higher rates of entrepreneurship than the U.S.-born at 11.5% compared to 9%But there’s one group with even higher rates of business generation: refugees. Refugees have a 13% rate of entrepreneurship. They are good for our economy, but we also save lives by accepting them. There are at least 79.5 million people worldwide forced to flee their homes. For some perspective, that’s less than 1% of the world’s population, and yet last year the U.S. settled an astonishingly low 11,814 refugees. 

For Hong Tran of Worcester, Massachusetts, his early life in Vietnam and even the journey to seek safety in the U.S. was filled with tragedyHe was orphaned while fleeing and lost his baby sister to pirates in the ocean. Thankfully, the U.S. gave him and his remaining family refuge, and they have given backThey have excelled at entrepreneurship, with his aunt and uncle launching three businesses while he grew up, and today Hong has a diner, a laundromat, a liquor store, a real estate company, and a law firm under his belt, creating more than 50 jobs in the process. Hong knows what it’s like to have nothing. Even with the rise in anti-Asian bigotry, he is determined to use his influence to help other immigrants and refugees get a leg up in their new homeland

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Sandro Catanzaro, who started several businesses in his native Peru but had no idea he’d end up helping NASA go to Mars, or that he’d use that same technology to plan and buy video ad campaigns. Now Head of Publisher Services Strategy for Roku, which acquired the company he founded, dataxu, in 2019, Mr. Catanzaro is an emblem of ingenuity and inventiveness. His demand-side platform, device graph technology and analytics platform help accelerate Roku’s ad tech roadmap and ability to serve a wide array of advertisers. But he’s not done yet!

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the Biden administration’s grudging concession that there needs to be upgrades to our physical barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border. They also groan as the Senate parliamentarian, as expected, will allow the Democrats to pursue one more bill by a simple majority during this fiscal year. That means the $2 trillion “infrastructure” bill can become law without a single GOP vote in Congress. And they get a kick out of President Biden trying to pretend he wasn’t a major catalyst in getting the all-star game moved out of Atlanta.

Paul Shirley, former NBA basketball player turned author and entrepreneur, joins Carol Roth to talk about his journey from athlete to creator, entrepreneur and small business owner. Paul shares a frank and raw narrative about how the government pandemic closures happened just as his young business was gaining momentum, and his frustrations as a business owner watching the government pick winners and losers. Paul and Carol also discuss how what happened has informed his go-forward strategy on his future endeavors.

Plus, a “Now You Know” on time zones.

Jim is back! Join Jim and Greg as they cheer Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp for speaking the truth about the new Georgia elections bill and contrasting it with the hyperbolic lies of the left. They also examine the bizarre effort of what Jim calls the “Democrat outrage complex” to get the Major League All-Star Game moved from Atlanta. And they welcome the news the Democrats are no longer trying to steal an Iowa congressional seat but the excuse for giving up the effort is truly pathetic.

Join Greg and Chad Benson as they cheer a very good March jobs report, showing more 900,000 new jobs added last month. They also wade through the sordid allegations emerging against Florida GOP Rep. Matt Gaetz and his counter-allegations that he the victim of an extortion attempt. And they react very strongly to Dr. Leanna Wen saying states should not open up yet because opening up should be conditional upon people getting vaccinated. She says, “Otherwise, people are going to go out and enjoy these freedoms anyway.”

Chad Benson is in for Jim today. Join Greg and Chad as they discuss corporate America’s spineless response to yet another political controversy. They also take a deeper dive into Joe Biden’s effort to boost labor unions by crushing freelance work. They fume as Dr. Fauci and others suddenly decide kids now have to be vaccinated before life returns to normal, and they remember the fascinating and controversial life of the one and only G. Gordon Liddy.

Immigrants and refugees are a net economic benefit to host countries like the United States. Research has consistently shown they help create jobs and add an important dynamism to our economy. This is the case even when there is initial investment on behalf of the state, through education, English classes or welfare. Immigrants pay more into the system than they get out.  For Christina Qi, who started a hedge fund at just 22, the welfare she was on in her early years in Utah after moving from China helped stabilize her youth and pave the way for her to attend MIT. She went on to co-found Domeyard, a quantitative trading firm, in 2013, among the longest running high-frequency trading hedge funds in the world, and was trading up to $7 billion dollars a day. In 2019, she founded Databento, an on-demand data platform for asset managers and quantitative analysts. Being an immigrant, Asian and a woman in the cutthroat, male-dominated world of Wall Street didn’t deter her. Nor did she forget those who helped get her to where she is today. As you’ll soon learn in this week’s JobMakers podcast.

Guest

Rob Long is in for Jim today. Rob and Greg react to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo doing exactly what Rob said he would do to distract from his many scandals. Then they’re glad to see President Biden’s poll numbers sinking on immigration policy. They also explain how Biden’s “infrastructure” bill appears to include a bunch of Green New Deal provisions, guts freedom to work. And they call out the left’s refusal to acknowledge basic biological reality when it comes to determining a person’s sex.

Rob Long is in for the vacationing Jim Geraghty. Join Rob and Greg as they welcome the rescue of the massive cargo ship Ever Given from the Suez Canal and highlight some important lessons that ought to be learned from this episode. They also discuss the coming reality of vaccine passports that will require you to have a COVID vaccine or a negative test to gain entry to various events and businesses. Is this the right of private sector businesses or a major blow to whatever privacy we have left? And we discuss the hysterical reaction to the new election laws in Georgia, with Rob explaining that recent elections prove that voter suppression isn’t actually a problem.

Welcome to JobMakers, a new, weekly podcast, produced by Pioneer Institute and The Immigrant Learning Center. Host Denzil Mohammed explores the world of risk-taking immigrants, who create new products, services and jobs in New England and across the United States.

In the debut episode, Denzil talks with Herby Duverné, CEO at Windwalker Group, an award-winning small business with more than 25 years of experience in physical and cybersecurity solutions that protect and prepare companies through custom learning and training solutions. Herby shares his background as a Haitian immigrant, and some of the challenges of moving to America, working through college to support his family, and embarking on a career path. They discuss what inspired him to start his own business, how he prepared for success, lessons he has learned along the way, and how he gives back.

Wayne Winegarden, Sr. Fellow in Business and Economics and Director of the Center for Medical Economics and Innovation at the Pacific Research Institute, re-joins Carol Roth to discuss his new study on the gig economy, “The Small Business Gig.” Wayne and Carol discuss how enacting harmful laws like California’s AB5 or the PRO Act (which recently passed the House) hinders innovation and restricts people’s ability to become entrepreneurs and provide for their families. Wayne and Carol also discuss the issues around the minimum wage, the Federal Reserve and other government intervention into free markets and why the federal stimulus package is a misnomer.

Plus, a “Now You Know” on outer space and ice cream.