This week on JobMakers, Guest Host Jo Napolitano talks with Josh Feast, the CEO and Co-Founder of Cogito, a Boston-based software company that deploys Artificial Intelligence (AI) to help employers in a wide variety of industries improve their customer service call centers. Josh got his start creating innovative technology to improve case management for a social services agency in New Zealand, before coming to America on a Fulbright scholarship to earn an MBA at MIT Sloan. In this episode, they discuss the many applications of Artificial Intelligence, how it helps provide emotional intelligence to augment management practices at large organizations, and how to address some of the concerns about privacy and bias that have been raised around its use.

Guest:

Member Post

 

Prof. Ed Roberts of MIT Sloan – Startup Prof Listen here: https://www.angelinvestboston.com/ed-roberts-mit-startup-prof Ed Roberts started the scholarly study of startups. Learn from this brilliant academic pioneer and seasoned investor in Sohu.com and HubSpot about the keys to success in founding a tech company. Along the way you will be entertained and charmed by his most engaging […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

This week on JobMakers, Host Denzil Mohammed talks with Mahmud Jafri, who built on a legacy started by his grandfather and began importing hand-knitted rugs from his native Pakistan, creating opportunities especially for women who traditionally couldn’t work outside the home. Today, he has three Dover Rug & Home stores across Massachusetts, including the Back Bay, which have experienced an uptick in sales during the pandemic’s “renovation revolution.” Jafri discusses why he made the journey to the U.S., and challenges he encountered, such as the “concrete ceiling” in the corporate world for foreigners at that time. He also shares thoughts on how to ensure the United States remains a welcoming country, and what can be done to more effectively integrate all immigrants for the benefit of everyone.

Guest

Member Post

 

  Thrift is an under-appreciated virtue in the world of startups. The founders of Wistia exemplified this virtue in the the way they built their video streaming startup. They rented a dilapidated house where they lived and ran their business for the first few years. They eschewed venture money and mostly bootstrapped their profitable growth […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Host Joe Selvaggi talks with cyber security expert Dr. Brandon Valeriano about the Colonial Pipeline shutdown and our national exposure to cyberattack on vital infrastructure.

Guest:

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the CDC finally telling vaccinated people they can stop with all the restrictions – a decision millions of Americans had already made. They also hammer President Biden for tweeting out people have to get vaccinated or stay masked and react to the “trust the science” crowd suddenly very mad at the scientists. And they discuss the implications of cyberterrorists attacking the Colonial Pipeline and Colonial agreeing to pay the $5 million ransom to restart operations.

Every immigrant experiences some kind of shock when they move to the United States, no matter their skin color, language or country of origin. And yet despite this, they learn to adapt to new laws, a new culture, a new education system, and eventually flourish. It takes a special kind of person to do that.  On this week’s episode of JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks to Larry O’Toole, founder of the multi-state Gentle Giant Moving Company that started in 1980 right here in the Boston area. They discuss Mr. O’Toole’s journey at a young age from Ireland to Brookline, Mass., the challenges of being uprooted, and the ability to thrive despite barriers such as skills gaps, that many immigrants face. That is why he’s part of a group that advocates for state and federal policies that foster complete economic integration of foreign-born talent and sustained prosperity for everyone, as we’ll hear more about in this week’s JobMakers.

Guest:

Join Jim and Greg as they dissect three lousy reports that highlight deeply flawed Biden administration policies, from huge numbers of people coming to the border, to a record number of available jobs that aren’t being filled, to very disturbing inflation numbers. And each of these of these problems was easily foreseeable.

Joe Selvaggi talks with Pioneer Institute’s Executive Director Jim Stergios about HB86, the so-called Fair Share Amendment, to tax Massachusetts household income above $1 million. They discuss its promises, its costs, and the effects of similar legislation in other states.

Guest:

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer Texas lawmakers or advancing legislation on several key conservative priorities. They also discuss the cyber attack that shut down a key fuel pipeline to the eastern U.S. They break down the latest scandal engulfing New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. And they remember the wit and conservative wisdom of the late Pete du Pont.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome two more states making progress on election integrity. They also cringe at the April jobs report coming in way below expectations. And they react to Democrats and activists using the absurd, supposedly inclusive term of “birthing people” instead of mothers.

Join Jim and Greg as they get a kick out of President Biden celebrating a very meager goal in getting kids back in the classroom.  They also fume as Biden sides with the WHO in wanting to “pause” the patents for the companies that developed the vaccines in order to boost production. And they react to Democrats debating whether to remove Iowa and New Hampshire as the first caucus and primary states because they’re too white.

The entrepreneurial spirit among immigrants and refugees allows them the flexibility to pursue unexpected courses of action, adapt, accept risk and make the most of opportunities they didn’t even know of before. For Dr. Amar Sawhney from India, that started at the University of Texas at Austin with 30 job rejections out of 30 applications. But he charted a path that would see him go in directions hitherto unknown to him: getting a PhD, helping found a company, journeying to Boston, and starting a string of new companies, using his chemical engineering background to save lives through remarkable local therapy innovations. To date, he has founded eight companies accounting for 4,000 jobs and more than $2 billion in revenue. He’s been named a “Champion of Change” by The White House, one of the “five most innovative Medical Device CEOs” by MassDevice, the EY regional entrepreneur of the year, The Immigrant Learning Center’s own Immigrant Entrepreneur Awardee for Life Science Business. But his influence extends well beyond that space into environmental conservationism, safeguarding refugees, mentoring and promoting STEM education, and building public understanding of America’s Sikhs, as you’ll hear in this week’s episode of JobMakers.

Guest:

Carol Roth gives you a preview of her upcoming book, The War on Small Business (available for pre-order now) and why the challenges to economic freedom transcend just the backbone of the economy. While the COVID pandemic gave the government the opportunity to attack small businesses and consolidate power, the groundwork has been set forth for decades. Carol talks about everything from the transfer of wealth abetted by the Federal Reserve to the exportation of capitalism to China in exchange for more central planning in the US and why it is threatening our individual rights and economy.

Plus, a “Now You Know” on the origins of “shirt loops”.

Join Jim and Greg as they dissect President Biden’s attempt to put a fresh coat of paint on the same old agenda Democrats have been pushing for decades, including his push for massive tax hikes and insistence that his gun control agenda is compliant with the second amendment. They also cheer Tim Scott for a terrific GOP response, in which he blew up several false narratives from Democrats and pushed for critical items like school choice. And they hammer media outlets of both political persuasions for publishing stories that didn’t have all the facts right and for catering to favored politicians.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Max Faingezicht, an immigrant who founded ThriveHive, a marketing software company for small businesses, and Telescoped, which uses remote software engineering to connect Latin American engineers with U.S. companies in need of their skills. The entrepreneurial ecosystem of Boston and Cambridge have allowed Max to achieve dreams he didn’t even know he had when he arrived. He can now foster entrepreneurship in his home country of Costa Rica while bringing much-needed talent to U.S. companies, all the while influencing what the future of work will look like. In this episode, he shares his fascinating immigration story, as well as his ideas on where workers go next.

Guest:

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Hilda Torres, an immigrant from Mexico who runs My Little Best Friends Early Learning Center in Malden, Massachusetts. One of the most successful businesses in the city, the center enrolls over 100 students whose parents come from more than 25 different countries. In this episode, Hilda shares how she used the tools of education, and her own grit and determination, to make her mark in the land of opportunity.

Guest:

Immigrants have higher rates of entrepreneurship than the U.S.-born at 11.5% compared to 9%But there’s one group with even higher rates of business generation: refugees. Refugees have a 13% rate of entrepreneurship. They are good for our economy, but we also save lives by accepting them. There are at least 79.5 million people worldwide forced to flee their homes. For some perspective, that’s less than 1% of the world’s population, and yet last year the U.S. settled an astonishingly low 11,814 refugees. 

For Hong Tran of Worcester, Massachusetts, his early life in Vietnam and even the journey to seek safety in the U.S. was filled with tragedyHe was orphaned while fleeing and lost his baby sister to pirates in the ocean. Thankfully, the U.S. gave him and his remaining family refuge, and they have given backThey have excelled at entrepreneurship, with his aunt and uncle launching three businesses while he grew up, and today Hong has a diner, a laundromat, a liquor store, a real estate company, and a law firm under his belt, creating more than 50 jobs in the process. Hong knows what it’s like to have nothing. Even with the rise in anti-Asian bigotry, he is determined to use his influence to help other immigrants and refugees get a leg up in their new homeland

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Sandro Catanzaro, who started several businesses in his native Peru but had no idea he’d end up helping NASA go to Mars, or that he’d use that same technology to plan and buy video ad campaigns. Now Head of Publisher Services Strategy for Roku, which acquired the company he founded, dataxu, in 2019, Mr. Catanzaro is an emblem of ingenuity and inventiveness. His demand-side platform, device graph technology and analytics platform help accelerate Roku’s ad tech roadmap and ability to serve a wide array of advertisers. But he’s not done yet!

Guest:

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the Biden administration’s grudging concession that there needs to be upgrades to our physical barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border. They also groan as the Senate parliamentarian, as expected, will allow the Democrats to pursue one more bill by a simple majority during this fiscal year. That means the $2 trillion “infrastructure” bill can become law without a single GOP vote in Congress. And they get a kick out of President Biden trying to pretend he wasn’t a major catalyst in getting the all-star game moved out of Atlanta.