Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that Senate Dems have virtually no hope of advancing their bill to federalize elections and BBB isn’t faring any better. They wince as the December jobs report once again comes in way below expectations. And they throw up their hands as Connecticut orders COVID-positive patients into nursing homes.

 

After noting Sen. Schumer’s latest failure to kill the filibuster, Jim and Greg serve up three crazy martinis! First, they hammer the Chicago Teachers Union for refusing to teach in-person over the Omicron case numbers. They also unload on the Virginia Department of Transportation for continuing an ugly governmental trend of admitting a major problem but insisting that nothing could have been done better in response to the traffic nightmare on I-95. And their heads are spinning as the CDC releases absurdly burdensome recommendations for fighting COVID and that private employers are following the mandates and firing people while nothing happens to unvaccinated federal employees.

More Small Business Closings Ahead?

 

Today we went to our local gun shop/shooting range to finally get in some practice; we’d already had to cancel one trip when we both got sick. We were greeted with a barrier across their driveway stating that they had to temporarily close due to the “flu,” and were too short-staffed. I was disappointed that they weren’t open, but mostly concerned that the two men who run the shop, John and Walter, might be ill, and we are especially fond of John. They don’t have a large staff to begin with.

We all know how devastating the business closures were in many states due to mandates, fears, and precautions. This time, however, there’s a new threat for small businesses: small numbers of staff who come down with the coronavirus and flu.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Jeff Farrah, General Counsel at the National Venture Capital Association, a D.C.-based group that advocates for public policy supportive of American entrepreneurship. They discuss why we should adopt reforms such as a “start-up visa,” allowing immigrant entrepreneurs to stay here in America so we can benefit from the potential job creation, innovation, and economic dynamism of newcomers who graduated from our universities, worked for American companies, or simply have a viable plan to start a business. Jeff knows that immigration and entrepreneurship go hand-in-hand, that immigrants are twice as likely to start a business, and that it’s not just big policy changes that could move the needle, as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers.

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Jeff Farrah serves as General Counsel at NVCA, where he advocates before Congress, the White House, and agencies for pro-entrepreneurship policies and leads in-house legal matters for the association, including management of the NVCA Model Legal Documents. He loves working at the intersection of venture, public policy, and the law. Jeff concurrently serves as Treasurer of VenturePAC, the political action committee of NVCA. Prior to joining NVCA, Jeff was Counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation where he advised Chairman John Thune (now Senate Majority Whip) and members of the committee on technology, telecommunications, and Internet policy. His committee perch gave him an invaluable perspective on how policymakers think about technology and its impact on American life. Previously, Jeff served as General Counsel to U.S. Senator Scott Brown, serving as Brown’s top legal and policy advisor on a variety of issues. During the 2012 presidential election, Jeff was a member of Governor Romney’s Trade Policy Advisory Committee. Prior to the Senate, Jeff was an attorney at a leading Washington, DC law firm for international trade matters. His trade law experience includes World Trade Organization Dispute Settlement and trade remedies cases before U.S. agencies. A native of southern California, Jeff earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of California, Santa Barbara (Go Gauchos!) and his Juris Doctor from Seattle University School of Law. Jeff was a Visiting Student at Georgetown University Law Center.

Join Jim and Greg as they enjoy two good martinis along with a crazy one. They’re thrilled with the news that President Biden and Sen. Manchin remain far apart on the massive spending & entitlement legislation and a vote this year is looking more and more unlikely. They also cheer Amtrak for announcing it will not be enforcing a vaccine mandate, the latest blow to Biden’s efforts to force private companies to demand employees get the vaccine. And Jen Psaki sets herself for another day of withering fire by insisting that we’re seeing much higher prices for beef due to the “greed of meat conglomerates.”

Reaping What They’ve Sown

 

Democrat policies — defunding police, turning criminals out of prison, and refusing to prosecute shoplifters and vandals — have resulted in a wave of smash and grab thefts, primarily in the bluest urban areas of the bluest states. Retailers hit by these policies are appealing to Congress.

Last week, the Retail Industry Leaders Association, representing 20 major retailers, sent a letter to Congress asking legislators to deal with the growing theft, shoplifting, and “smash-and-grab” mob attacks on retail stores. The corporations represented include giants like Target, Best Buy, Nordstrom, Home Depot, and CVS.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Carlos Castro, president and CEO of Todos Supermarket in Woodbridge, Virginia, a successful business employing more than 200 people. He describes the perilous conditions in his native El Salvador, why he crossed the border to America, and why immigrant business owners tend to hire people like them, in this week’s JobMakers.

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Jim and Greg are glad to see the public opposed by lopsided margins to many of the extreme provisions in the “Build Back Better” legislation. They also discuss new revelations about how involved Chris Cuomo was in helping his brother try to weather his many scandals. And they call foul on Twitter’s new policy banning any media unless everyone in the video or photo agrees to it.

 

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with virologist, Dr. Peter Kolchinsky, about the explosion of vaccine technologies and innovations brought into the spotlight by the massive investment to fight the pandemic, and dives deeply into the exciting promise of vaccines to combat an ever-widening range of disease.

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Gerard Robinson and Cara Candal talk with Prof. Paul Israel, Director & General Editor of the Thomas A. Edison Papers at Rutgers University, and author of Edison: A Life of Invention, the definitive biography of America’s greatest inventor. Professor Israel describes Edison’s public and private life, as well as the impact of his world-changing inventions, such as the hot-filament light bulb, the phonograph, and the motion-picture camera. Called the “Wizard of Menlo Park,” Edison is still the American with the most individual patents — 1,093 in the U.S. and 1,200 in 34 foreign countries. They discuss what educators and students in the 21st century can learn from how Edison ran the country’s first industrial research laboratory in New Jersey, and the importance of the U.S. Patent Office in protecting inventors’ exclusive right to profit from their inventions. They also discuss what students should learn about the role inventions have played in the historic success of the United States and in the highly dynamic and competitive global economy. Professor Israel concludes with a reading from his biography.

Stories of the Week:  The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) is celebrating its 75th anniversary of providing education for the children of American service members. Today, DoDEA operates 160 schools in eight districts across 11 countries, seven U.S. states and two U.S. territories for more than 67,000 students. (Read Pioneer’s related 2015 report.) In West Virginia, the Professional Charter School Board approved three applications for the state’s first ever charter public schools, which will provide another option for families who want and need a different learning environment.

The Republican/Big Business Divorce

 

Last week, I posted a Tweet from Republican Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (a.k.a., Frank Luntz’s roommate) in which he excoriated big business. “If Corporate America thinks jumping on the bandwagon after Tuesday’s election and before the impending red wave will make conservatives forget the role they played in subjecting the U.S. to open borders and runaway inflation, they are sorely mistaken.” I received it with the same skepticism I treat a Democrat president who shows up to church only on election years when there’s press around, or Oprah when she used to go on diets.

On the other hand, this widely circulated opinion piece (It’s been in the Washington Post, The Guardian, Business Insider, and a lot of other outlets) posits that “Big Business Can’t Rely on Republicans Anymore.”

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Larry Kim, founder of WordStream in Boston, which was acquired for $150 million, and MobileMonkey, a chatbot marketing platform for marketing and customer support on Facebook Messenger, web chat and SMS. Larry’s parents fled to Canada after the Korean War on a one-way ticket. That in turn gave him the opportunity to purchase his own one-way ticket to the U.S. to fulfill his American dream. Larry is creating hundreds of meaningful jobs for Americans, something he’s not only proud of but feels is at the core of his values, to give back to the country that gave him the opportunity to actualize bold new ideas. Through his technology, he’s helped tens of thousands of companies to grow their businesses, and, with nearly 750,000 followers on Medium.com, he mentors budding entrepreneurs from around the world, as you’ll discover in this week’s JobMakers.

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No good martinis today, but join Jim and Greg as they react to the Biden administration urging employers to mandate vaccinations regardless of how courts rule on the new OSHA rule. They also fume as Biden considers shutting down a key Great Lakes pipeline even though energy prices are set to skyrocket this winter. And they wade into the bizarre internet guessing game of where California Gov. Gavin Newsom has been for the past two weeks.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the Fifth U.S. Circuit of Appeals for placing a stay on President Biden’s order mandating vaccinations for everyone at companies employing 100 or more people. They also welcome the latest indictment from the Durham investigation into the origins of the Russian collusion probe and what it may foreshadow about where Durham is focused next. And they fume as 13 House Republicans vote in favor of the bloated $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill and save Democrats from even more political dysfunction and embarrassment.

Join Jim and Greg for all good martinis today! First, they celebrate Glenn Youngkin’s win over Terry McAuliffe in the Virginia governor’s race and other good news for GOP candidates in Virginia. They’re also pleasantly surprised by the very strong showing by Jack Ciattarelli in the New Jersey governor’s race, suggesting Republicans can be competitive just about anywhere next year if they play their cards right. They react to Democrats and liberal media pundits learning nothing from the election results and preparing to double down on the same failed strategies. And they highlight more results from around the country that give conservatives reason to smile.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they dissect new polls that show voters trusting Republicans more on several key issues and by wide margins.  They also roll their eyes at the climate summit in Scotland and at climate envoy John Kerry’s effort to end energy derived from coal altogether. And they unload at the Lincoln Project and its Democratic operative allies for Friday’s stunt aimed at looking like white supremacists were supporting the GOP candidate for governor in Virginia.

This week on Hubwonk, Joe Selvaggi talks with global supply chain expert, MIT Professor Yossi Sheffi about the unprecedented global supply and demand shocks created by the Covid-19 pandemic and how effective supply chain managers in an integrated world economy adapted to provide consumers with food, goods, and vaccines in record time.

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Jim Geraghty is back! Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the National School Board Association no longer accusing parents of being domestic terrorists but they still have a lot of questions. They also wince as evidence piles up that an economy that should be in a robust recovery is slowing down and possibly headed into a recession. And they get a kick out of Terry McAuliffe saying Stacey Abrams was the real winner of the 2018 Georgia governor’s race after falsely accusing Glenn Youngkin for months of disputing the 2020 election results.

 

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with John Dearie, founder and president of the Center for American Entrepreneurship, a Washington, D.C.-based research, policy and advocacy organization. Immigration is core to his mission to build a policy environment that promotes entrepreneurship because he knows all too well that the United States was and continues to be built by entrepreneurial immigrants who had the drive and determination to pick up, leave everything they know behind, and build a new life in a new homeland. So to John, it is no surprise they are twice as likely to take another risk: start a business. He’s also seen across the country frustration among business owners, both U.S.-born and foreign-born, at an immigration system that works against this country’s interest. Why? Because it doesn’t seek to actively attract or retain talent from the rest of the world. John sees the decline in U.S. entrepreneurship and believes that more immigration, not less, would power the nation’s economy and innovation, which have made us the global leader. Instead, he’s seeing an unnecessarily partisan and toxic approach to immigration that, he says, harms us all and is inherently unamerican, as you’ll discover in this week’s JobMakers.

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