Our guest on this episode is Harrison Rogers, a serial entrepreneur and investor who is passionate about turning ideas into lucrative ventures. Rogers found another passion after having turned around a few distressed companies and returning them to very healthy and profitable positions. Moving forward Harrison is just as excited and passionate about investing in and helping distressed companies as he is investing in and starting new ventures.

This podcast is brought to you by America’s Future. We offer rising generations opportunities for networking, mentoring, leadership and community engagement through our national network and extensive array of programming.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Niall Ferguson, the Milbank Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and a senior faculty fellow of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard. He is the author of 16 books, including Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe. Dr. Ferguson comments publicly for the first time on the recent passing of Queen Elizabeth II, the longest-reigning British monarch, and how we should teach about Britain’s wide impact – positive and negative – on the world in her era and over the last several hundred years, from the Magna Carta to Winston Churchill. Dr. Ferguson shares findings from his most recent book, which charts the history of disasters, from the 1346–1353 Black Death to COVID; whether our handling of these catastrophes – from both public health and economic standpoints – has improved; and how we can learn from mistakes to better prepare for the future. He describes the kind of education he imparts to his own children to help ensure they have the wisdom and resilience to live in a turbulent world. The interview concludes with Dr. Ferguson reading from his latest book.

Stories of the Week: Are schools of education helping future teachers develop content expertise, or are they too focused on pedagogy and ideology? In Philadelphia, the Martin Luther King High School is the city’s first school with Black faculty for all core freshmen subjects, a step forward in the effort to ensure students can benefit from diverse role models.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Dominic Pino, Thomas L. Rhodes Fellow at the National Review Institute, about his research and writing on the recently averted rail strike, including how the rail industry is organized, what labor’s demands were, and how the prospect of a nationwide rail strike exposed vulnerabilities within the American economy.

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In 1976 one Thomas McCann published a book titled An American Company. In 1987 it was reissued – in “edited” form, and with an introduction by someone himself introduced as a graduate of Harvard Law School as well as a speechwriter for the George McGovern and Ted Kennedy presidential campaigns – as On the Inside: […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they serve up one bad martini and two crazy ones. First, Jim lays out the details of the looming freight rail strike or lockout that could do serious damage to our economy and why there are several indicators that there won’t be a deal by Friday. They also hammer Never Trump Utah “independent” Senate candidate Evan McMullin who ran for president in 2016 vowing to end Roe v. Wade and is now decrying the Supreme Court ruling and vowing to restore abortion if elected. And they roll their eyes as White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre says it is Republicans’ fault that the border is a mess.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Dr. Patrick Anquetil, immigrant from France and co-founder and CEO of Portal Instruments in Cambridge, Massachusetts, a clinical stage, medical device company developing a needle-free drug delivery platform. As Patrick shares, there was no way he could have started a business like this in his home country. The spirit of entrepreneurship that we take as a given here in America does not exist everywhere; in many countries, taking risks to start a business is actually frowned upon. So, Patrick went to MIT, which he says gave him “a sense of great possibilities.” That freedom to innovate has led, in his case, to a transformative patient experience, something we can all appreciate. But it could only have been created in a place that fosters an entrepreneurial spirit in its people, new or old, as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers podcast.

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It’s all good martinis today! Join Jim and Greg as they welcome news that the Oregon governor’s race is a toss-up thanks to a former Democrat running as an independent. They also celebrate news that the strong hiring numbers we’ve seen in the wake of the pandemic are overwhelmingly powered by Republican-led states. And they discuss why it was long past time for Brian Stelter to be shown the door at CNN after constantly turning a program designed to objectively evaluate the media into a cheerleading session for the left.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Dr. Liya Palagashvili, immigrant from the former Soviet Union, Senior Research Fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, and affiliated research fellow at NYU Law. Dr. Palagashvili shares findings from research she co-authored on the Optional Practical Training (OPT) program, which fills the gap for international students between studying in the U.S. and being employed here through a work visa. The program enables America to retain talented students at just the time in their lives when they’re likely to generate ideas and start businesses, but recent legislation seeks to end the program. Dr. Palagashvili explains why such a move is counterproductive and even a national security threat. Instead, she argues, reforming and making it easier to access OPT would help enhance America’s edge in the global search for talent, and prevent that talent from moving to Canada, the U.K. and other countries – as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers.

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Join Jim and Greg as they assess Rep. Liz Cheney getting trounced in the Wyoming congressional primary, her odd Lincoln reference in her speech last night, and whether she is really planning to run for president in 2024. They also shake their heads as the political left and their media allies drop the bogus talking point that their massive spending bill reduces inflation and admit it’s just advancing their big government goals on climate policy and more. And they hammer Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser for continuing to demand that all students be vaccinated for COVID before being allowed in schools when up to 40 percent of black students remain unvaccinated.

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We could have predicted this.  Two big companies headquartered in Seattle have had multiple retail outlets push for unionization.  We have watched as Amazon warehouses go through union elections, with most going down to defeat.  But wait, there’s more!  At least one of those elections has been challenged.  By the Department of Labor, who in […]

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Join Greg and Scot Bertram as they hammer the Biden administration and Democrats for promising a bill to lower inflation but really just spends more, taxes, more, and harasses middle class Americans. They also wonder what is happening at The Atlantic as it publishes a story downplaying far-left attacks on pro-life organizations but blasts the pro-life community for pointing out that it’s happening. And they sigh as the World Heath Organization won’t be honest about how to stop monkeypox but it’s super worried that the name monkeypox could be stigmatizing.

 

We love our listeners and we love hearing from you! So we decided to ask what questions you’d like us to address.  Today we start with a great hypothetical. If conservatives won control of the House, Senate, and White House (with a supermajority in the Senate), which president from the past 100 years would we want setting the agenda and what would we want him to focus on. Then they take on a question asking what margin Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis needs to win re-election by to have real momentum for a 2024 presidential bad – and how damaging would it be for him if Sen. Marco Rubio wins by a wider margin?  Finally, they tackle a Terminator-themed political question in a crazy but intriguing final martini.

Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with Dr. Bill Smith, Director of Pioneer Institute’s Life Sciences Initiative, about the impact of the Inflation Reduction Act on long-term health costs. They discuss the bill’s unintended consequences, potential effect on the region’s vibrant pharmaceutical research and development sector, and what citizens can do about it.

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Chips—semiconductors—are a critical part of our modern economy (read all about that in Mark’s book). So, where they’re manufactured matters. It’s good that Congress finally noticed.  But there’s far more to the story, and more to be done, much of it differently, to reignite American “soft” power in the “hard” industries of manufacturing.

For historical perspective see “How America Can Create Jobs,” by Andy Grove, in Bloomberg, July 1, 2010.

Join Jim and Greg as they dig into reports that plummeting demand – and not President Biden – are responsible for falling gas prices. They also sigh as businesses of all sizes are making plans to flee Taiwan if the China invades. And they get a kick out of New York Rep. Carolyn Maloney saying she didn’t expect President Biden to run again in 2024 and then gushing over him with praise when she apologizes.

 

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Khamzat Asabaev, refugee from Chechnya and cofounder of SoftSmile, a software tool that helps dentists provide affordable, quality orthodontic treatment. Khamzat pursued entrepreneurship to make basic services accessible to all, after experiencing a lack of access to basic care as a refugee and a minority. Refugees like Khamzat face terrible circumstances, but through resilience and fortitude, often make significant contributions to their adopted homeland, with higher rates of employment and entrepreneurship. That means they give back far more than we gave them, as you’ll discover in this week’s JobMakers.

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This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Boston Globe columnist Jeff Jacoby about November’s Massachusetts Ballot Question 1, the so-called Fair Share Amendment. They examine both the merits and timing of a graduated state income tax, as well as the effects on society of creating separate categories of tax payers, and the dangers of setting the many against the few.

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This week Mark Mills expands on his Wall Street Journal review of the book Restarting the Future: How to Fix the Intangible Economy by Jonathan Haskel and Stian Westlake.

 

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with April Ryan, immigrant from Russia, founder and CEO of Red Iguana nail art products, and influencer to hundreds of thousands. April came to the U.S. from a poor town, speaking no English, but through tenacity and inventiveness, she achieved success by creating video tutorials of nail art, and developing a breakthrough product that became a bestseller in 19 countries. April’s story is the immigrant story, about the kind of people who embark on the journey to America, and then put their pluck and ingenuity to use for the benefit of everybody, as you’ll hear in this week’s JobMakers podcast.

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