Join Jim and Greg as they welcome news of a pretty big shift in political party allegiance over the past year. They also unload on the tech executive and partial owner of the NBA’s Golden State Warriors who coldly declared that he and most people do not care about the plight of the Uighurs in China. And they’re frustrated to learn that the gunman at the Texas synagogue hostage crisis was allowed into the U.S. despite numerous red flags.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they applaud Democratic Senators Kyrsten Sinema and Joe Manchin for refusing to eliminate or alter the filibuster despite massive pressure from their own party. They also welcome the Supreme Court’s decision striking down President Biden’s vaccine mandate on all businesses with more than 100 employees while also noting a separate decision that upheld the mandate on personnel at health care facilities. And they take a look at even more signs that Russia may be planning to invade Ukraine in the coming weeks.

After a brief discussion about outgoing Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam commenting on his blackface yearbook photo, Jim & Greg welcome polls showing just 40 percent of Michigan voters are ready to re-elect Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. They also grimace as year-on-year inflation is the worst in almost 40 years. And they hammer President Biden for saying anyone not supporting the Dems’ plan on elections reform is the equivalent of George Wallace, Bull Connor, and Jefferson Davis.

 

Jim & Greg welcome the return of in-person schooling to Chicago after a four-day hissy fit from the Chicago Teachers Union. They also sigh as President Biden reportedly makes no progress in trying to deter Russian military action in Ukraine. And the Biden administration gets caught flat-footed again as out supply chain problems grow.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome Senate Republicans making their decisions about running in 2022 and with two incumbents deciding to run again, the GOP odds of taking the majority probably improved. They also fume as New York City Mayor Eric Adams decides to support a city council resolution allowing 800,000 non-citizens in the city to vote in municipal elections. And they’re stunned as Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor claims – in oral arguments – that 100,000 kids are seriously ill with COVID and that many of them are on ventilators. None of that is anywhere close to accurate.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that Senate Dems have virtually no hope of advancing their bill to federalize elections and BBB isn’t faring any better. They wince as the December jobs report once again comes in way below expectations. And they throw up their hands as Connecticut orders COVID-positive patients into nursing homes.

 

So… What Is the Ideal Tax Structure

 

Hey, Ricochetti.

As a life-long conservative, I have adopted a general disdain for pretty much all taxes. I cringe at the Progressives’ reflexive call for “taxing the rich” and “making the rich pay their fair share.” I experience a reasonable amount of irritation and anger at the seemingly endless list of taxes we encounter throughout modern American society.

After noting Sen. Schumer’s latest failure to kill the filibuster, Jim and Greg serve up three crazy martinis! First, they hammer the Chicago Teachers Union for refusing to teach in-person over the Omicron case numbers. They also unload on the Virginia Department of Transportation for continuing an ugly governmental trend of admitting a major problem but insisting that nothing could have been done better in response to the traffic nightmare on I-95. And their heads are spinning as the CDC releases absurdly burdensome recommendations for fighting COVID and that private employers are following the mandates and firing people while nothing happens to unvaccinated federal employees.

More Small Business Closings Ahead?

 

Today we went to our local gun shop/shooting range to finally get in some practice; we’d already had to cancel one trip when we both got sick. We were greeted with a barrier across their driveway stating that they had to temporarily close due to the “flu,” and were too short-staffed. I was disappointed that they weren’t open, but mostly concerned that the two men who run the shop, John and Walter, might be ill, and we are especially fond of John. They don’t have a large staff to begin with.

We all know how devastating the business closures were in many states due to mandates, fears, and precautions. This time, however, there’s a new threat for small businesses: small numbers of staff who come down with the coronavirus and flu.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Jeff Farrah, General Counsel at the National Venture Capital Association, a D.C.-based group that advocates for public policy supportive of American entrepreneurship. They discuss why we should adopt reforms such as a “start-up visa,” allowing immigrant entrepreneurs to stay here in America so we can benefit from the potential job creation, innovation, and economic dynamism of newcomers who graduated from our universities, worked for American companies, or simply have a viable plan to start a business. Jeff knows that immigration and entrepreneurship go hand-in-hand, that immigrants are twice as likely to start a business, and that it’s not just big policy changes that could move the needle, as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers.

Guest:
Jeff Farrah serves as General Counsel at NVCA, where he advocates before Congress, the White House, and agencies for pro-entrepreneurship policies and leads in-house legal matters for the association, including management of the NVCA Model Legal Documents. He loves working at the intersection of venture, public policy, and the law. Jeff concurrently serves as Treasurer of VenturePAC, the political action committee of NVCA. Prior to joining NVCA, Jeff was Counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation where he advised Chairman John Thune (now Senate Majority Whip) and members of the committee on technology, telecommunications, and Internet policy. His committee perch gave him an invaluable perspective on how policymakers think about technology and its impact on American life. Previously, Jeff served as General Counsel to U.S. Senator Scott Brown, serving as Brown’s top legal and policy advisor on a variety of issues. During the 2012 presidential election, Jeff was a member of Governor Romney’s Trade Policy Advisory Committee. Prior to the Senate, Jeff was an attorney at a leading Washington, DC law firm for international trade matters. His trade law experience includes World Trade Organization Dispute Settlement and trade remedies cases before U.S. agencies. A native of southern California, Jeff earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of California, Santa Barbara (Go Gauchos!) and his Juris Doctor from Seattle University School of Law. Jeff was a Visiting Student at Georgetown University Law Center.

Member Post

 

In order to Build Back Better you first have to clear the lot of existing structures to make space for the new “better” structure.  You have to admire the efficiency of the Germans – Krystalnacht was only 1 night in 1938 – the democrats have had an entire year of rioting and looting, and still […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Join Jim and Greg as they enjoy two good martinis along with a crazy one. They’re thrilled with the news that President Biden and Sen. Manchin remain far apart on the massive spending & entitlement legislation and a vote this year is looking more and more unlikely. They also cheer Amtrak for announcing it will not be enforcing a vaccine mandate, the latest blow to Biden’s efforts to force private companies to demand employees get the vaccine. And Jen Psaki sets herself for another day of withering fire by insisting that we’re seeing much higher prices for beef due to the “greed of meat conglomerates.”

Reaping What They’ve Sown

 

Democrat policies — defunding police, turning criminals out of prison, and refusing to prosecute shoplifters and vandals — have resulted in a wave of smash and grab thefts, primarily in the bluest urban areas of the bluest states. Retailers hit by these policies are appealing to Congress.

Last week, the Retail Industry Leaders Association, representing 20 major retailers, sent a letter to Congress asking legislators to deal with the growing theft, shoplifting, and “smash-and-grab” mob attacks on retail stores. The corporations represented include giants like Target, Best Buy, Nordstrom, Home Depot, and CVS.

Member Post

 

When I first heard the phrase “Stagflation”, I was in the part of my career when I was very secure in my job and my income was steadily rising. I didn’t have any real problem with inflation, but I remember thinking that I was very glad I wasn’t retired and on a fixed income. Move […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Carlos Castro, president and CEO of Todos Supermarket in Woodbridge, Virginia, a successful business employing more than 200 people. He describes the perilous conditions in his native El Salvador, why he crossed the border to America, and why immigrant business owners tend to hire people like them, in this week’s JobMakers.

Guest

Jim and Greg are glad to see the public opposed by lopsided margins to many of the extreme provisions in the “Build Back Better” legislation. They also discuss new revelations about how involved Chris Cuomo was in helping his brother try to weather his many scandals. And they call foul on Twitter’s new policy banning any media unless everyone in the video or photo agrees to it.

 

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with virologist, Dr. Peter Kolchinsky, about the explosion of vaccine technologies and innovations brought into the spotlight by the massive investment to fight the pandemic, and dives deeply into the exciting promise of vaccines to combat an ever-widening range of disease.

Guest:

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Gerard Robinson and Cara Candal talk with Prof. Paul Israel, Director & General Editor of the Thomas A. Edison Papers at Rutgers University, and author of Edison: A Life of Invention, the definitive biography of America’s greatest inventor. Professor Israel describes Edison’s public and private life, as well as the impact of his world-changing inventions, such as the hot-filament light bulb, the phonograph, and the motion-picture camera. Called the “Wizard of Menlo Park,” Edison is still the American with the most individual patents — 1,093 in the U.S. and 1,200 in 34 foreign countries. They discuss what educators and students in the 21st century can learn from how Edison ran the country’s first industrial research laboratory in New Jersey, and the importance of the U.S. Patent Office in protecting inventors’ exclusive right to profit from their inventions. They also discuss what students should learn about the role inventions have played in the historic success of the United States and in the highly dynamic and competitive global economy. Professor Israel concludes with a reading from his biography.

Stories of the Week:  The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) is celebrating its 75th anniversary of providing education for the children of American service members. Today, DoDEA operates 160 schools in eight districts across 11 countries, seven U.S. states and two U.S. territories for more than 67,000 students. (Read Pioneer’s related 2015 report.) In West Virginia, the Professional Charter School Board approved three applications for the state’s first ever charter public schools, which will provide another option for families who want and need a different learning environment.

The Republican/Big Business Divorce

 

Last week, I posted a Tweet from Republican Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (a.k.a., Frank Luntz’s roommate) in which he excoriated big business. “If Corporate America thinks jumping on the bandwagon after Tuesday’s election and before the impending red wave will make conservatives forget the role they played in subjecting the U.S. to open borders and runaway inflation, they are sorely mistaken.” I received it with the same skepticism I treat a Democrat president who shows up to church only on election years when there’s press around, or Oprah when she used to go on diets.

On the other hand, this widely circulated opinion piece (It’s been in the Washington Post, The Guardian, Business Insider, and a lot of other outlets) posits that “Big Business Can’t Rely on Republicans Anymore.”