Immigrants have higher rates of entrepreneurship than the U.S.-born at 11.5% compared to 9%But there’s one group with even higher rates of business generation: refugees. Refugees have a 13% rate of entrepreneurship. They are good for our economy, but we also save lives by accepting them. There are at least 79.5 million people worldwide forced to flee their homes. For some perspective, that’s less than 1% of the world’s population, and yet last year the U.S. settled an astonishingly low 11,814 refugees. 

For Hong Tran of Worcester, Massachusetts, his early life in Vietnam and even the journey to seek safety in the U.S. was filled with tragedyHe was orphaned while fleeing and lost his baby sister to pirates in the ocean. Thankfully, the U.S. gave him and his remaining family refuge, and they have given backThey have excelled at entrepreneurship, with his aunt and uncle launching three businesses while he grew up, and today Hong has a diner, a laundromat, a liquor store, a real estate company, and a law firm under his belt, creating more than 50 jobs in the process. Hong knows what it’s like to have nothing. Even with the rise in anti-Asian bigotry, he is determined to use his influence to help other immigrants and refugees get a leg up in their new homeland

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Sandro Catanzaro, who started several businesses in his native Peru but had no idea he’d end up helping NASA go to Mars, or that he’d use that same technology to plan and buy video ad campaigns. Now Head of Publisher Services Strategy for Roku, which acquired the company he founded, dataxu, in 2019, Mr. Catanzaro is an emblem of ingenuity and inventiveness. His demand-side platform, device graph technology and analytics platform help accelerate Roku’s ad tech roadmap and ability to serve a wide array of advertisers. But he’s not done yet!

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the Biden administration’s grudging concession that there needs to be upgrades to our physical barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border. They also groan as the Senate parliamentarian, as expected, will allow the Democrats to pursue one more bill by a simple majority during this fiscal year. That means the $2 trillion “infrastructure” bill can become law without a single GOP vote in Congress. And they get a kick out of President Biden trying to pretend he wasn’t a major catalyst in getting the all-star game moved out of Atlanta.

Paul Shirley, former NBA basketball player turned author and entrepreneur, joins Carol Roth to talk about his journey from athlete to creator, entrepreneur and small business owner. Paul shares a frank and raw narrative about how the government pandemic closures happened just as his young business was gaining momentum, and his frustrations as a business owner watching the government pick winners and losers. Paul and Carol also discuss how what happened has informed his go-forward strategy on his future endeavors.

Plus, a “Now You Know” on time zones.

Jim is back! Join Jim and Greg as they cheer Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp for speaking the truth about the new Georgia elections bill and contrasting it with the hyperbolic lies of the left. They also examine the bizarre effort of what Jim calls the “Democrat outrage complex” to get the Major League All-Star Game moved from Atlanta. And they welcome the news the Democrats are no longer trying to steal an Iowa congressional seat but the excuse for giving up the effort is truly pathetic.

Join Greg and Chad Benson as they cheer a very good March jobs report, showing more 900,000 new jobs added last month. They also wade through the sordid allegations emerging against Florida GOP Rep. Matt Gaetz and his counter-allegations that he the victim of an extortion attempt. And they react very strongly to Dr. Leanna Wen saying states should not open up yet because opening up should be conditional upon people getting vaccinated. She says, “Otherwise, people are going to go out and enjoy these freedoms anyway.”

Chad Benson is in for Jim today. Join Greg and Chad as they discuss corporate America’s spineless response to yet another political controversy. They also take a deeper dive into Joe Biden’s effort to boost labor unions by crushing freelance work. They fume as Dr. Fauci and others suddenly decide kids now have to be vaccinated before life returns to normal, and they remember the fascinating and controversial life of the one and only G. Gordon Liddy.

Immigrants and refugees are a net economic benefit to host countries like the United States. Research has consistently shown they help create jobs and add an important dynamism to our economy. This is the case even when there is initial investment on behalf of the state, through education, English classes or welfare. Immigrants pay more into the system than they get out.  For Christina Qi, who started a hedge fund at just 22, the welfare she was on in her early years in Utah after moving from China helped stabilize her youth and pave the way for her to attend MIT. She went on to co-found Domeyard, a quantitative trading firm, in 2013, among the longest running high-frequency trading hedge funds in the world, and was trading up to $7 billion dollars a day. In 2019, she founded Databento, an on-demand data platform for asset managers and quantitative analysts. Being an immigrant, Asian and a woman in the cutthroat, male-dominated world of Wall Street didn’t deter her. Nor did she forget those who helped get her to where she is today. As you’ll soon learn in this week’s JobMakers podcast.

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Rob Long is in for Jim today. Rob and Greg react to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo doing exactly what Rob said he would do to distract from his many scandals. Then they’re glad to see President Biden’s poll numbers sinking on immigration policy. They also explain how Biden’s “infrastructure” bill appears to include a bunch of Green New Deal provisions, guts freedom to work. And they call out the left’s refusal to acknowledge basic biological reality when it comes to determining a person’s sex.

Rob Long is in for the vacationing Jim Geraghty. Join Rob and Greg as they welcome the rescue of the massive cargo ship Ever Given from the Suez Canal and highlight some important lessons that ought to be learned from this episode. They also discuss the coming reality of vaccine passports that will require you to have a COVID vaccine or a negative test to gain entry to various events and businesses. Is this the right of private sector businesses or a major blow to whatever privacy we have left? And we discuss the hysterical reaction to the new election laws in Georgia, with Rob explaining that recent elections prove that voter suppression isn’t actually a problem.

Welcome to JobMakers, a new, weekly podcast, produced by Pioneer Institute and The Immigrant Learning Center. Host Denzil Mohammed explores the world of risk-taking immigrants, who create new products, services and jobs in New England and across the United States.

In the debut episode, Denzil talks with Herby Duverné, CEO at Windwalker Group, an award-winning small business with more than 25 years of experience in physical and cybersecurity solutions that protect and prepare companies through custom learning and training solutions. Herby shares his background as a Haitian immigrant, and some of the challenges of moving to America, working through college to support his family, and embarking on a career path. They discuss what inspired him to start his own business, how he prepared for success, lessons he has learned along the way, and how he gives back.

Wayne Winegarden, Sr. Fellow in Business and Economics and Director of the Center for Medical Economics and Innovation at the Pacific Research Institute, re-joins Carol Roth to discuss his new study on the gig economy, “The Small Business Gig.” Wayne and Carol discuss how enacting harmful laws like California’s AB5 or the PRO Act (which recently passed the House) hinders innovation and restricts people’s ability to become entrepreneurs and provide for their families. Wayne and Carol also discuss the issues around the minimum wage, the Federal Reserve and other government intervention into free markets and why the federal stimulus package is a misnomer.

Plus, a “Now You Know” on outer space and ice cream.

Join Jim and Greg as they note the New York Times and other liberal media grudgingly admitting that Florida did better than lockdown states in fighting COVID and in keeping its economy alive. They also dig into immigration and border policy as the Biden administration finds out governing is a lot harder than coming up with misleading slogans.  And they tee off on dictionary.com as it adds “supposably” as a real word instead of trying to teach people to use “supposedly.”

Host Joe Selvaggi talks with Chris Anderson, President of the Massachusetts High Technology Council, about the reasons why Massachusetts has a thriving tech sector, what challenges his members have faced in the pandemic, and what he sees as the most prudent path toward future prosperity in the commonwealth.

Guest:
Christopher R. Anderson is president of the Massachusetts High Technology Council, Inc. Before becoming president in January 2001, he served as vice president and general counsel for the Council. In January 2006, Mr. Anderson was appointed to serve as a member of the state Board of Education (BOE), the nine-member panel that oversees state K-12 education policy. From November 2006 through August 2007, he served as Chairman of the BOE, an appointment designated by former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. Mr. Anderson graduated from Lexington High School in Lexington, MA. He holds a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Notre Dame, and a law degree from Suffolk University School of Law.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the failure of the Neera Tanden nomination for the Office of Management and Budget. They also welcome strong vaccination numbers in Texas, which makes Gov. Abbott’s decision to open the state 100 percent a pretty safe move. They also welcome the notion of allowing people to make their own decisions. And they cringe as the number of newborns in the U.S. after nine months of the pandemic were disturbingly low.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin is opposing the nomination of Neera Tanden, President Biden’s choice for budget director, and two of the most moderate Republicans are already saying they’re voting against her as well. They also hammer California Democrat Ro Khanna, after the congressman says he doesn’t want small businesses that cannot afford to pay $15 per hour. And they follow the insane evolution of “the experts,” who are now saying that you will need to wear a mask long after the bulk of the population has been vaccinated.

In Latest Facebook Scandal, Sheryl Sandberg Leans Backward

 

Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook is in the news again, this time facing allegations in a lawsuit that she knew the company was overestimating and misrepresenting its projected advertising numbers — and failed to disclose that fact to clients for years.

It’s amazing the downward trajectory Sandberg’s reputation has taken in just a few years. Here in Silicon Valley, she was initially seen as supremely competent, the real architect of Facebook’s explosive success, and — most of all — the lone adult at the company who kept Mark Zuckerberg in check. Then, in 2013, she published Lean In and became a national phenomenon, the heroine and role model to millions of young women struggling to make it in the business world. There seemed no limit to her career; there were even whispers of her becoming the first woman POTUS.

But then, especially after her Congressional testimony and some other comments that made her sound less like a paragon of character and more just a shill for her company, the attitude in tech was modified to: “Well, she’s just doing what she has to do in her job. But she’s still a person of character.” You know, kind of like a mob lawyer: defending bad behavior, but not participating in it.

Host Joe Selvaggi talks with Pioneer Institute’s Andrew Mikula about his recent research into migration trends of high-income individuals, how pandemic-related technologies may accelerate that movement, and what challenges these changes present for policy makers.

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Host Joe Selvaggi talks with Connecticut Business and Industry Association’s President and CEO, Chris DiPentima, about what policy makers can learn from Connecticut’s journey from the wealthiest state in the nation, to one with more than a decade of negative job growth.

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Nottingham Forest Is Infested With Hedges

 

My favorite Robin Hood film is still the classic film featuring Errol Flynn. Although I don’t remember seeing the scene depicting Robin selling information to the Sheriff of Nottingham.

One of the allegations being made in the GameStop stock run-up is that those running the Robinhood app were selling members’ trading information to the big traders.

Now there’s been a lot of howling from the hedge fund professionals. I find it amusing that those that have two yachts are now worried about the little traders. What is not so amusing is the question of how much leverage was used to stop the trading of Game Stop stock.